#1
Hi, I am a Student and I know guitar maintenance might consume lots of your pocket money. (STUDYING OVERSEAS)

I recently visited a guitar store along with my squier telecaster. So I told them about the fret buzzing issue and they have a look at my guitar.

They came back and told me that It needs a guitar set up since the neck is bent. Now it does cost a lot for guitar set ups they said.

I recently changed my strings 3 times (2 ernie balls that are shit and the current being the elixr nanowebs). Now my mom tracks my spending and most of the
time it was on guitar strings. So I'm sure she won't let me do any guitar related services since I spend a lot of money already.

Is guitar set up extremely important? Can't I just wait for like 5 more months ?  (my Tele is 1yr old)

Can't I just Adjust the truss rod ? (the guitar dude's said it needs a proper set up not just adjusting the truss rod)
#2
Which frets buzz?  Does it happen on all the strings?  How is the action?  Does it sound out of tune when you are fretting notes lower than fret 5?  Does it sound out of tune when you are playing higher than fret 5?  Did the guitar play well when you got it a year ago?
Not taking any online orders.
#3
Doing your own set-up can def' save some bucks. I like to start with the guitar manufactures recommended set-up spec's and then tweak to taste. Fender has a good set-up guide on their website. Give it a try!
#4
if it's bent then it will need a set up.
if it's just neck relief and action you can learn how to do that yourself.
i'm assuming you don't have the tools to fix a warped neck or level frets
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#5
1)  You can wait 5 months, but you'll be playing a buzzy guitar.

2) a setup isn't expensive.  It's like 50$ for a basic setup - find away to cut back on something else if you can't afford it.  If it needs fretwork it may cost slightly more. A setup is by far the most important aspect of a guitar's tone and playability. Intonation alone is worth the price.  I'd rather play a 300$ well setup guitar than a $5000.00 guitar with a mediocre setup. 

3) Ernie Ball strings are excellent, as are most strings by major manufacturers, like D'Adarrio etc..  The coated strings from Elixir are fine if you want them to last longer, but they aren't cost effective and certainly don't sound better than a normal string.  I would suggest sticking with one type of string and one gauge. Changing gauges can mess your intonation and the neck. 

4) After you get a setup, when changing strings in the future only change them one string at a time. This helps keep the setup in check - because you aren't drastically altering the tension of the neck at all when changing strings. I do this and and my setups last about 6 months, and that's including drastic weather and temperature changes.
#6
Yes - you need to set up guitars every once in a while to keep them playing tip top, just like you change the oil in a car - its just regular maintenance.

some suggestions 

1 - learn to do a setup yourself for your guitar, there are tons of tutorials online and on youtube, basically a screw driver, an allen key, a guitar tuner and a bit of knowledge and you can setup your guitar. Sometimes its a good idea to get a professional setup done to give you a good starting point of what the guitar should feel like after a good setup.

2 - setups are not that expensive, where I am they are around $60 canadian from a local guitar tech or a shop. Also sometimes music stores have specials on, Long and McQuade (music store chain in Canada) just had a free setup day, buy a set of strings and get a free setup.

3 - stop spending so much money on whatever you are spending it on so that you can pay for a setup or

4 - get a job so you have your own money to pay for things
#7
I can actually see that the neck is bent. But Gosh, I have to wait for a while.. Too much spending for the last 2 months
#8
reverb66  I hate ernieball's. They rust extremly fast and the tone sucks as well.  I prefer Dadarrio's

Btw I stayed with 9|42 my whole life.
#10
Quote by reverb66

4) After you get a setup, when changing strings in the future only change them one string at a time. This helps keep the setup in check - because you aren't drastically altering the tension of the neck at all when changing strings. I do this and and my setups last about 6 months, and that's including drastic weather and temperature changes.


You can change strings all at once or one at a time. The tension on the neck isn't an issue and you won't lose your setup as long as your bridge stays in position.

Buy this book: https://www.amazon.com/Make-Your-Electric-Guitar-Great/dp/0879309989
Best $18 you'll spend on your guitar. Because then you'll know how your guitar works and you can (mostly) do your own minor setups.

#11
That book is great to have on hand. If you're really slow like me, Youtube can help, but a physical reference is a great buy. 

Feeler gauges are like $5 at an auto parts store, FYI. A basic setup is pretty easy to do yourself.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#13
Quote by AcousticMirror
All that's good advice unless the neck is actually bent.

I'm assuming you mean warped rather than just needing the relief adjusted, right?
#14
https://support.fender.com/hc/en-us/articles/214343803-How-do-I-set-up-my-Telecaster-guitar-properly-

I did my own set-up on my cheap telecaster(monoprice) and it needed a lot of adjustment(action, pup heighth, intonation) after reading a few on-line tutorials. It took a couple of hours but wasn't too difficult and I already had the tools. By bent neck, do you mean it needs a truss rod adjustment or the neck is actually bent. If it's actually bent, that doesn't sound good.