#1
What i mean is .... say I'm playing something like Bend G14 up a whole step then play E12 and B12  quickly. classic blues lick. I keep hitting the open D string and getting a gross sounding drone no matter what i do.

I'm under the belief that i should be using the heel of my picking hand to mute this string, right? Am I misunderstanding? 

I feel like proper muting is HUGE and a very big difference between intermediate and advanced players. As an intermediate player, I can play really fast and impressive, but it's sloppy and gross sounding. I really want to bridge that gap. 
#2
Don't worry about it. This problem goes away naturally all by itself; in fact it has to because trying to "learn" it consciously is impossible. The hands eventually figure out the complex choosing, timing, and coordination mechanics of damping unplayed strings with practice experience.
All you have to do is be aware of the issue, and you already are. Whenever you hear it, your hands know you aren't happy with it happening - they will automatically work to avoid it and one day you will notice that the undamped strings problem is improving, then gone.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#3
I suspect there are also picking issues here ... having played the E string (down stroke), are you hitting the G string with an up stroke (which should avoid the issue you have)?

Regardless, muting is extremely important for guitar, and especially when distortion is used.

For me, I form a "tunnel" in my picking hand, in which one string can vibrate freely.  Both sides of this string are muted (assuming that string isn't the treble E or bass E, in which case a tunnel isn't needed).

I use the large muscle on the pinky side of my hand, along with my pinky being loosely curled.  My forearm is slighly supinated, so the hand is at a slight angle to the strings.  The joint nearest the pink tip mutes treble-side strings.  The flesh of the large muscle, nearish the wrist (1"  or so) mutes the bass strings.  The slight angle is what allows one string to vibrate.
#4
Quote by RyanMW2010
What i mean is .... say I'm playing something like Bend G14 up a whole step then play E12 and B12  quickly. classic blues lick. I keep hitting the open D string and getting a gross sounding drone no matter what i do.

I'm under the belief that i should be using the heel of my picking hand to mute this string, right? Am I misunderstanding? 

I feel like proper muting is HUGE and a very big difference between intermediate and advanced players. As an intermediate player, I can play really fast and impressive, but it's sloppy and gross sounding. I really want to bridge that gap. 

you tube the eric johnson tutorial from his dvd where he talks about muting and dampening - it's very good.   Some go as far as to hook the upper strings with the fingers of their right hand and use their palm for the lower strings.  You can also mute with your index finger on your left hand if you lay it lightly across the fretboard on the lower strings while bending with your third finger. You can get a rake in with that approach as well, so it's a good technique to work on. 
#5
Short answer is yes, your picking hand can help mute the strings above the fretted note that aren't being played. You really get used to that kind of muting technique after doing it a lot and figuring out what picking hand position is comfortable for you.