#1
So, being new to loop pedals (and music theory in general) I was hoping for some tips on songs to practice with. So far I've been using Comforably Numb. The chords are pretty easy and the solo really fun. But I'm already out of ideas. I really wanted to practice more solos along C major pentatonic scale, but any good ideas would be appreciated.
My problem is I'm having problems simply strumming certain chords and trying to play the scales over it. I can't get the rythm on either to fit. So, I need more examples to properly learn.
What are some really good songs to noodle around to? It doesnt have to be a song - any tips in chord progressions and tempo to noodle over would be welcome.

#2
Quote by AnrBjotk
My problem is I'm having problems simply strumming certain chords and trying to play the scales over it. I can't get the rythm on either to fit.


What do you mean by this? Do you know how to create a simple 4/4 loop that stays in time?

Also, the simple E, Am progression is the only progression you ever need
Last edited by vayne92 at Jun 27, 2017,
#3
Quote by vayne92
What do you mean by this? Do you know how to create a simple 4/4 loop that stays in time?

Also, the simple E, Am progression is the only progression you ever need

Yes and no... What I mean is, examples of easy to loop and noodle over songs, like Comfy Numb. Making the loop stay in tempo is a whole other battle...
Like, I can just about make a chord progression for Hey Joe and noodle over the solo. But trying to do that with, say, Clapton's Lay Down Sally, and I just cannot manage to get the rythm of the chords right...
So until I learn that, whare are some good beginner songs that have an easy to grasp tempo for the progressions.

Sure, E/Am is easy, but what tempo to make it easy to play some pentatonics over? I never thought that you cant just play two chords then noodle, it needs to fit.
#4
You don't really need a specific rhythm or tempo to practice with. As long as the chord changes are "even" you really only need to worry about harmony to just practice. I do a lot of playing over whole measure pads. Sure, playing lead requires interaction with the rhythm of the music to an extent, but by not having any particular rhythm frees you up rhythmically and a lot of music tends to be a very basic four-to-the-floor with little to no syncopation anyway.
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#5
Quote by theogonia777
You don't really need a specific rhythm or tempo to practice with.  As long as the chord changes are "even" you really only need to worry about harmony to just practice.  I do a lot of playing over whole measure pads.  Sure, playing lead requires interaction with the rhythm of the music to an extent, but by not having any particular rhythm frees you up rhythmically and a lot of music tends to be a very basic four-to-the-floor with little to no syncopation anyway.


So, what are some examples of chord progressions and scales?