Poll: Which do you prefer?
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View poll results: Which do you prefer?
Bright, lots of treble, pick attack
7 32%
Warm, lots of bass, powerful mids
15 68%
Voters: 22.
#1
Do you get your tone to be agressive and heavy through it's high end, prescence and pick attack (the bass is bass guitar's job), or through the bass frequencies and powerful mids?

I mean slight changes, not like rolling the bass to 1 and treble to 10.

Which do you prefer, and for what exact genre?
#2
I prefer somewhere in between, not too warm, but not too bright either. Balanced and with not a ton of gain 
#3
Thread was moved to forum: Guitar Gear & Accessories
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#4
The job of a good producer is to get both. You mix with bass in mind, so the low lows get cut in most cases so that's why I am always at players with massive low end.
Mine are in between at the moment, I dial in bright but I like chunk as well. I try not to overdo the bass as after all we have a bass player too.
#5
Generally I like powerful mids with good highs letting the Bass playing take most of the low end.
#7
I guess the cymbals and vocals fill up the high end and guitar had to get as much as it can from the mids or higher mids.

Anyways, I've seen a band where the bass guitar sounded really huge and guitars were very middy and had tons of treble and presence. Combined, it sounded huge, almost like the guitars were tuned an octave down. Playing in E flat standard, they were the heaviest sounding band I've heard live
#8
The key is balance.

Too much bass, and it becomes a boomy wall of mud. Too much treble, and it can sound shrill and harsh. And in my experience from seeing bands live, scooping out all the midrange leads to a case of both these issues.

How to EQ for a good metal tone depends entirely on the guitar and amp used. I tend to like warm guitars w/bright pickups, and vice versa, through mid-rangey, or slightly bright amps.
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#9
Quote by FlightofIcarus
Too much bass, and it becomes a boomy wall of mud. Too much treble, and it can sound shrill and harsh.


Yeah but those qualities are often desirable.
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#10
Somewhere in between is ideal and it depends if i'm playing rhythm or lead but if it's one or the other definitely warm with low end and a mid punch, after using a boss metalzone for so long I stay far away from anything ear piercing lol.

Then again when playing some leads or deadly riffs you really need that high end to cut though...
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#11
For me its kind of in between; it also depends on what I'm playing. I find myself going back and forth between 2 different settings though. Crank the highs-scoop mids, and Crank the mids-turn down the highs.

I don't like too much bass in my tone really, so I'll usually for the most part always have it at half way or just below half way
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#12
It depends on situation and music you are playing. Sometimes big, fat and muddy slightly undefined tone is the best (doom, some forms of death metal), other times a bright sharp face grinding aggressive tone is the best. (Thrash, other forms of death metal). This is a question with no right or wrong answer.

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#13
Also depends if you're talking about playing at home or in a band.
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#14
DarthV
Rehearsals and live. I'm asking because I'm wondering how people get a nice balance, something I can't get with my band. I will definitely try going very warm on my next rehearsal
#15
lately, i've been turning away from the conventional "good" metal sound i used to go for (Arch Enemy, Carcass, new Decapitated). in my head, the tone i want is sort of a cross between Deathspell Omega and Virus, something that feels relatively low-gain with chiming clarity but still a bit of unrefined grit and power on the palm mutes.

dunno how to get it though, my gear isn't right for it i think. right now i'm using the British voicing on my HT-5 and bumping up the mids, while actually cutting the mids and further boosting treble on my Seymour Duncan overdrive pedal because it gives me some high end sparkle and grit to make up for the low gain setting on the amp. my guitar has EMG 707s though, and for now i've lowered the pickups a ton so that the signal isn't so hot.
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#17
My current amp setting are blasted mids and treble and low bass in the preamp section and Then boosted bass, only slightly cut mids and only slightly boosted low treble with high treble flat in the loop. I get a nice 80's metal sound without the post preamp EQ.

Edit: I'm running s Mesa Mark IV.
Last edited by risingforce1 at Jun 30, 2017,
#18
I prefer in the middle with boosted mids. Current amp is warm and bassy with good mids, so I keep lows under half, highs a bit over half and mids almost maxed then push it with a tubescreamer and run it through a brighter sounding 2x12.
#19
Bass: Chug low string, turn bass up from 0 until it flubs out then back off just enough to bring the tightness back
Mids: Turn up enough to be saturated sounding without honk or nasal tones. Add more as needed for band settings.
Treble & Presence: Turn up until the tone sounds aggressive but not harsh.
Gain: Turn up until you hear it go from open sounding to compressed sounding and back it off to the cusp point.
Volume: Loud
Last edited by pinheadslts75 at Jun 30, 2017,
#20
I'm a huge fan of Diezel Amps that sometimes have a Mid-Cut built in. If not, I keep the mids around 10 o clock, the treble around 3 o clock and the bass around 2-3 o clock (depending on how the bass player has his/her rig setup). 
I'm a huge fan of Adam Jones and love that kind of tone and have adapted a similiar amp response to my playing style. A love the highs to stand out - especially seeing how I don't play the high E or B strings that often.
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#21
Quote by pinheadslts75
Volume: Loud

I've found that to be a huge thing. Less agressive in the high end, less gain, and more volume = the palmmuted notes have that punch in them, it can sometimes even be too much, but even though my tone isn't very saturated at all, I never need more gain.

So this works for live.... at rehearsals, my amp is too loud to get that nice dynamic tone and when turned down, it lacks that punch. Seems like tube amps are hard beasts to tame
#22
Quote by ArturPr
Do you get your tone to be agressive and heavy through it's high end, prescence and pick attack (the bass is bass guitar's job), or through the bass frequencies and powerful mids?

I mean slight changes, not like rolling the bass to 1 and treble to 10.

Which do you prefer, and for what exact genre?

While the bass guitar is responsible for carrying the low end, IMO some people and bands, especially the more modern you go, tend to overdo this.  The guitar does carry some low end with it, and I absolutely can't STAND the modern trick of high-passing the guitars at like 140hz and cranking the mids to the moon (aka -- "djent.")  There is some valuable information in the 100hz region of metal guitars.  Bands in the 90s and early 2000s had this figured out; I don't know what went wrong.

As far as the tone I typically use, it doesn't change very much from one subgenre to another -- my playing style does.  I think too much or too little of anything just doesn't work.  My bass, mids, and treble hover around the same number on the amp's EQ section.  Gain is set for a healthy amount of saturation but not washed out and blurry.  I play black metal and death metal, btw.  I use the same settings for both.  One thing I also don't like is an overly 'tight' tone.  I like to hear a little low-end "bloom" on palm mutes. 
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#23
On today's rehearsal, I cranked my mids to 9, and I asked the other guitarist to do the same. The sound was very thick, creamy, powerful, and not very boxy.

I find this weird. It should sound like shit. Maybe it's because I'm using a seventy 80 which is a flat speaker, it doesn't have a mid spike like a V30 does.
The other guitarist uses a Valveking 412, which also sounds very "neutral" to me
#24
diabolical listened to some Fryette Sig X demos, i like!  Wampler Triple Wreck doesn't sound like it'd do it, though it is a great sounding distortion.
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Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

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