#1
You'd walk into a guitar shop and it was the most amazing thing you'd seen,Guitars all hanging there sparkling and you had no idea which were good and which weren't other than price you'd pick up a guitar with an unprejudiced attitude and if it sounded good and felt good it was good.You knew nothing about what pickups it had,Body materials,Whether it was made in Mexico or the US or Korea or which was supposedly better.The only info you had was when the guy who sold you it said something like 'yeah that's a Japanese one,Much better than the Korean shit' and you thought you had something special.
I miss naivety in a way.Ignorance was bliss.
It was the days before the internet i suppose.
I thought it was a much more exciting and enjoyable experience to buy a guitar.
#2
I don't understand anything you're saying.
I've always been a know-it-all.


><*runs, ducks, giggling all the way*
#3
No it sucked being put in a situation where I had to try out the guitar I was thinking of buying when I was very self-conscious about my lack of skill at playing guitar in public places. 

I was also totally lost about what guitar to buy because I was still unsure about what exactly I wanted. That was a pretty serious concern when I was a kid given I was pretty much emptying my entire bank account into that guitar, so it had better be the right one for me. But knowing if it was the right one or not was so hard to know when I was being given so many different options and alternatives. 
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#4
Since I was a keyboard player first, I learned about guitars from the guitar players I worked with well before I walked into a music store for anything but sheet music.
#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
No it sucked being put in a situation where I had to try out the guitar I was thinking of buying when I was very self-conscious about my lack of skill at playing guitar in public places. 

I was also totally lost about what guitar to buy because I was still unsure about what exactly I wanted. That was a pretty serious concern when I was a kid given I was pretty much emptying my entire bank account into that guitar, so it had better be the right one for me. But knowing if it was the right one or not was so hard to know when I was being given so many different options and alternatives.

Ah yeah.I was a little different because my first electric was bought for me.It was a Hohner Jazzmaster shape.White with totoise shell pick guard.I had a friend with an Encore Strat copy in red and i really wanted a Strat after seeing that along with seeing Clapton so when i first went to buy a guitar in a shop i had a clear objective..Fender Strat(or Squier and Fender logo in small letters as it was all i could afford)I also knew a few blues licks and Smoke On The Water so i was in good stead for the guitar store.
#6
Quote by EyeballPaul
Ah yeah.I was a little different because my first electric was bought for me.It was a Hohner Jazzmaster shape.White with totoise shell pick guard.I had a friend with an Encore Strat copy in red and i really wanted a Strat after seeing that along with seeing Clapton so when i first went to buy a guitar in a shop i had a clear objective..Fender Strat(or Squier and Fender logo in small letters as it was all i could afford)I also knew a few blues licks and Smoke On The Water so i was in good stead for the guitar store.

I knew I wanted a Gibson V the first time I went into a guitar store (I loved Metallica and I still like them). But obviously at 14 that wasn't what I could afford.

I was being thrown lots of cheaper alternatives. LTD's, Ibanez, Epiphone etc. and I was so conscious of the fact that whatever I could afford was never really going to align with what I truly wanted. So I was in a constant state of concern that whatever I bought was never going to leave me satisfied the way the real deal would.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#7
Nope.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
I have to laugh at myself, my ignorance was running rampant for quite some time. Then when I actually learnt something for the first time...suddenly I was a pro. And yea, that Gio was a real winner. I wonder, 10 years from now, will I still critique every aspect of a particular guitar I want, I mean by then you would think I would know, who knows. 10 years is a long time, I need a new amp like tomorrow.
Flying in a blue dream
#10
I really don't miss those days...now it is more fun when you walk in to a real music store, like say the Guitar Exchange in Chicago and see all these gorgeous boutique creations...

My starting up days were full of wonder, sure, but when I think about it all the gouging that went on when I went to the store, I don't miss a single thing.
I, for one, saw the dark side of the mom & pop stores. Houston's H&H and the one we lovingly call Rockin'n'Robbin' (Rockin' Robbin) charged $8 and up for a pair of strings around 1993. Parker Music gouged me for a little Marshall 10 watt practice amp double what it cost at Musiciansfriend, which was then a paper mail order catalog...found out later when I wised up a little thanks to guitar magazines.

Actually, IMO internet has helped keep prices fair, but I guess the brick and mortars are suffering now as not many people go for these sales tricks anymore.

For some reason, I've always known quality guitars. I miss the days of the uninformed pawn shop though. One by me was selling this pre-Gibson Epiphone for $250 at the time, too bad I was into metal and didn't want a grandpa guitar at the time
I've also returned a 2nd hand Aria that in retrospect was a great guitar just because I didn't know how to set it up properly.

I guess it held a lot more mistique...

I miss a lot of the good music shops that disappeared from my area, also a lot of the brands that died (some are still here but garbage Chinese knockoff): Hamer, Kramer, Jackson. Charvel, BCRich, Washburn, Robin (made in Houston), Dean, etc.
#11
In the western country side of Denmark 1991 I did not know anything other than an Applause stratocaster would fit the first electric guitar need and budget. Fast forward to 1993 to 1995 and finding that what you really wanted only had alternatives as you were out of the target market for general possible consumer for the local stores. That I proved wrong as I did get to be a good costumer with more than 50 sales for gear over time.

Needless to say the guitars I had did not last but I learned what I wanted and did not like. By 1995 it started to turn and the right 2 guitars finally came.

One was the dream and the other won me over with time.

No I don't miss the days as having gear especially guitars that does not make you happy is not going to be long term at all. Every time I pick up my dream guitar I am reminded of the day back in January 1997 when it was fresh and new from the Jackson custom shop in US. When it feels right that feeling stays with you.
#12
Ignorance is only bliss if you are ignorant to your own ignorance.

Unfortunately, I have always had a certain level of awareness of my ignorance regarding pretty much anything new that I have attempted. Knowing stuff about a thing helps to make me a whole lot more comfortable and confident with that thing so I can enjoy it more.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#13
I don't miss those days at all -- I spent way too many years clueless and using extremely crappy gear and spending all my money on stupid effects. I guess I liked fiddling with those effects at the time and thought I sounded awesome though. It wasn't until about 8 years ago though that I got around to upgrading to a high gain tube amp and realized that all the tones I'd used before were utter crap...
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#14
Quote by KailM
I don't miss those days at all -- I spent way too many years clueless and using extremely crappy gear and spending all my money on stupid effects. I guess I liked fiddling with those effects at the time and thought I sounded awesome though. It wasn't until about 8 years ago though that I got around to upgrading to a high gain tube amp and realized that all the tones I'd used before were utter crap...
I have great memories of going through the settings of those crappy 90's flangers and chorus pedals and awful sounding distortion pedals

Oh and the ridiculously complicated multi-effects units where you'd lose your patch for days
Last edited by EyeballPaul at Jun 29, 2017,
#15
Quote by EyeballPaul
I have great memories of going through the settings of those crappy 90's flangers and chorus pedals and awful sounding distortion pedals

Oh and the ridiculously complicated multi-effects units where you'd lose your patch for days

I can't say I share your nostalgia. Finding nothing but stupid, gimmicky effects when you were just looking for a decent tone was kinda more frustrating than it was fun.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#16
T00DEEPBLUEIt don't half teach you how to dial in a tone though.After all that experimentation i bet you can get on almost any amp and find a usable setting.It's all a learning process
#17
Who said I know anything now :cheers

Things were a lot simpler when I first started. Trial and error did teach me a lot which can be invaluable. Having said that I really wish I had all the resources available now. So no don't miss not knowing anything.
#18
Quote by EyeballPaul
T00DEEPBLUEIt don't half teach you how to dial in a tone though.After all that experimentation i bet you can get on almost any amp and find a usable setting.It's all a learning process

Maybe, but polishing that turd for hours still wasn't fun. Most really cheap amps and MFX units just aren't worth anyone's time. Pretty disappointing when you just spent quite a lot of money (in relative terms) on a piece of gear when even at it's best, it still sounds like ass.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#19
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
No it sucked being put in a situation where I had to try out the guitar I was thinking of buying when I was very self-conscious about my lack of skill at playing guitar in public places. 

I was also totally lost about what guitar to buy because I was still unsure about what exactly I wanted. That was a pretty serious concern when I was a kid given I was pretty much emptying my entire bank account into that guitar, so it had better be the right one for me. But knowing if it was the right one or not was so hard to know when I was being given so many different options and alternatives. 


i agree but the confounding factor with me is that i'm actually more self-conscious now than when I was clueless (I mean, I'm still clueless, just slightly less so ). I didn't have the wit to realise how dopey I was.

Quote by Blompcube
Ignorance is only bliss if you are ignorant to your own ignorance.

Unfortunately, I have always had a certain level of awareness of my ignorance regarding pretty much anything new that I have attempted. Knowing stuff about a thing helps to make me a whole lot more comfortable and confident with that thing so I can enjoy it more.


yeah that too
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
Uh not really, unless you are meaning that knowlwedge might make one skip a perfectly good guitar because of brand, hardware, electronics or where it is made bias and even then no.

Ignorance and eager salesman helped me to buy less than stellar gear in my youth once I was in a posistion to purchase new gear, as far as buying hand me down gear from whoever I knew that had something for sale it didn't make much difference because

1. I didn't have much choice with my grass mowing money.
2. Most of it was old 60's Japanese stuff anyway.

I definately could have bought better new gear in the beginning once I could afford it, not quite much with guitars but with amps and effects etc.

When I started playing in the early 1980s many of the big brands that are readily available now were nowhere to be found where I was from it was typically Gibson/Epi, Fender and a crap load of 2nd gen Japanese or guitars from Aria Pro II, Lotus, Cort, Samick etc. It was not until 1991 when I first layed eyes on a Jackson/Charvel E.S.P.or Ibanez in one of our local music stores. My first "real " quailty guitar was a 1992 Charvel Fusion Deluxe.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
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Time for primal concrete sledge

Last edited by Evilnine at Jun 29, 2017,
#21
Some fun memories about bad multifx. Getting a Digitech DSP21 (I think that's what it was called) to realize it was POS. DOD multifx pedal plastic expression pedal flying off its hinges mid gig almost making me fall off the stage...and other fun stories...
#22
I don't really miss getting ripped off by shady stores, I don't miss being so tempted by brands that I'd take a shitty Marshall AVT over something like an HRD, I don't miss being clueless and not knowing how to get the sounds I want and how to find guitars I like.


So no, I literally don't miss anything about it at all.
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Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#23
No i don't miss my clueless days. I don't like buying a guitar, then later realizing I've either 1) Got ripped off 2) wrong guitar for the wrong genre 3) it sounds horrible.