#1
When I try to hold my pinky down on any chord the middle joint bends inward, it's not exactly painful but just feels like I'm doing something wrong...

Any ideas or comments?
Thanks
#2
Position your pinky so the tip frets the string and not the flat part?, and don't use excessive pressure. On the other hand, if it works and there's no pain, then it might just be your thing.
Flying in a blue dream
#3
carcinogeneticistkarkles00 It's never a good idea for a finger joint to bend inwards (at least not regulalry).  The problem will certainly be the angle your finger is coming down onto the string, and can be exacerbated by the guitar set up (string gauge, height of strings).  Also, make sure you push the string down as near to the fretwire as possible, as there's less effort involved (as opposed to pushing down half way between 2 frets).

The finger angle is affected by your grip, your wrist position, so you need to experiment until you find a combination of wrist, hand and finger angles that let's you fret comfortably ... but if you're guitar setup is causing you problems, you'll want to sort that.  Electric or acoustic guitar?
#4
Electric guitar, the only finger I have these issues with is my little finger. Thanks for the feedback . I'll look at my position and try to fix it.

Any other suggestions are really appreciated.
#6
The knuckle should stay concave. You are probably either mis-positioning your pinky or using the incorrect muscle to apply force through it. The motion should be the same as curling the finger into the palm, as if you were making a fist. The force should come from the forearm, not the hand and wrist. 
#7
Quote by cdgraves
The knuckle should stay concave. You are probably either mis-positioning your pinky or using the incorrect muscle to apply force through it. The motion should be the same as curling the finger into the palm, as if you were making a fist. The force should come from the forearm, not the hand and wrist. 

That's not entirely clear. I would say the force should come from either pulling back gently on the neck using the bicep, or simply from the weight of the arm when it relaxes (gravity doing the work). But yes, the force of fretting the string should not come from the finger and thumb muscles.
#8
Thanks for the responses!

I have adjusted where the force is coming from, but it is still happening. However, it only happens with the thicker strings, (D, A, low E) and with my little finger so it might just be a weak joint.

Is there a way to make it stronger? I can play high E and B just the same but the higher, thicker strings make it bend.
#9
carcinogeneticistkarkles00 The problem is probably due to the fact that the pinky needs to be straighter to reach the thicker strings, so is more prone to collapsing. My suggestion would be to move the hand/wrist forward slightly (or just mess with different hand positioning) to increase the curvature of the pinky. The more curved it is the less likely it is to collapse.
#10
Quote by carcinogeneticistkarkles00
Thanks for the responses!

I have adjusted where the force is coming from, but it is still happening. However, it only happens with the thicker strings, (D, A, low E) and with my little finger so it might just be a weak joint.

Is there a way to make it stronger? I can play high E and B just the same but the higher, thicker strings make it bend.

Sounds like a placement issue. Make sure you're using the very tip of the finger (special circumstances excepted). 
#11
That would just be a lack of strength/control of the muscles in your fingers. It's actually quite common, but electric guitarists aren't confronted with chords that require them to really positions their fingers in a manner that allows the other strings to ring out. Since the distortion makes them want to do the opposite, and mute that unwanted noise. 

Hence, most end up only using the muscles in the palm of their hand and the first joint of the finger, or they just tense up the entire finger and guide it to its position with the muscles in the palm of their hand. In short, stretch out your fingers, then clench them without using your hand to make a fist. So curl the fingers, but not into the hand. Another point of focus in your actual practice is to focus on bending the finger between the first and second joint, not the hand. That tends to be very difficult for most, but that's what you'll need.

So, nothing wrong. Nothing to be worried about, just unfocused, weak muscles and different practice habits. Change them, it'll take a while, but you'll be all the better for it. As a sidenote, there are good tricks to be done with hypermobility, as far as fingerings are concerned. But don't overdo it, your joints are not made for that.
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