#1
I have a fender California series (T-bucket) and my only problem is that the first 3 strings (E, B, G) sound too loud (too much treble), i havent changed the strings in 6 months expecting them to sound warm after all that time but they still sound to bright whether i play with a pick or with my fingers. i use thin strings btw.

what id like is that my strings wouldnt sound too bright, rather warm and "dirty? " Any suggestions? 


-ive been told to get a sound hole cover, but its difficult to get one where i live.
#2
1st thing I'd do is change string brands.  Different brands produce different tones and some guitars just don't sound good with certain brands. 
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#3
Quote by CorduroyEW
1st thing I'd do is change string brands.  Different brands produce different tones and some guitars just don't sound good with certain brands. 

True. But for steel string sets the 1st and 2nd strings in all sets and from all brands are always plain high tensile steel and are all very similar (gauge for gauge) - and, indeed, the chances are that many string makers buy their wire from the same supplier. 

This is always a problem when people discuss different strings: the winding wire might be different but the plain strings are not. So when people say, eg. "80 / 20 bronze are brighter than PB" . . . . . . . perhaps, but the plain strings are the same.
#4
Two things I tried on my too-bright kona lap steel:

Lower the air resonance frequency by making the soundhole smaller, using a lute hole.

Ballast the bridge by adding mass. I ended up using three brass pins and three wood ones. This gave the result I was looking for.
#5
Quote by Garthman
True. But for steel string sets the 1st and 2nd strings in all sets and from all brands are always plain high tensile steel and are all very similar (gauge for gauge) - and, indeed, the chances are that many string makers buy their wire from the same supplier. 

This is always a problem when people discuss different strings: the winding wire might be different but the plain strings are not. So when people say, eg. "80 / 20 bronze are brighter than PB" . . . . . . . perhaps, but the plain strings are the same.

true, but swapping string can change the tone of the wound string which can make the unwound string seem brighter or darker
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#6
You can use a different saddle material for the top 3 strings.  This involves cutting the saddle between the 4th and 3rd and using, for example a hardwood (which eventually will be subject to wear/settling over time)or brass or aluminum for the top 3.  Or take your saddle out and try different materials who knows, a material might be found that suits your preference across all the strings.  Just lay the materials across the bridge til you find what you like then make a saddle out of it.  Use the original saddle for a template.
You can also try felt or micro fiber (like eyeglass cleaning cloth) under the top 3 strings.
#7
skido13 

That's a good point, and reminded me of some saddle swapping I did a few years back. I bought a couple of Graphtech black saddles a few years back, because they I had a bright,  near metallic ring when dropped on on glass counter. - I thought they would make the guitar sound brighter. Quite contrary to expectation they killed some of the high transients and enhanced the high mids, so I went back to bone after a couple of weeks. It might be a good material for what the OP wants, but the effect is subtle.
#8
Ouri2011  You do realize Fender also builds the Telecaster, the brightest electric guitar known to man, don't you?

All of the guitars in Fender's, "California Series", are tuned to be rather bright. I think it's what Fender calls "the surf sound".

With those things said, IIRC, my Fender "Sonoran" was bright and loud with the stock set of Fender branded strings. They were .012 to .053, "acoustic light", 80/20 alloy. So Fender was going for bright, with that "brass alloy string set".

If too loud is really an issue, you night be able to dial the whole thing down a notch or two with "custom light" strings (.011 to .052).

I managed to solve all the issues with my Sonoran by buying two Epiphone EJ-200-SCEs, and playing them instead. Not that the Fender is a bad guitar, mind you, the Epj's are just a whole lot better.

On a more "serious note", you can always plug the sucker in and buy a sub-octave synthesizer pedal. I know that sounds heretical for an acoustic forum, but if you add a lower octave, it balances the sound out quite nicely. I often use an ElectroHarmonix, "Pitchfork"when I capo the guitar. It restores all the bass and sub-harmonics the capo takes away. The higher you place the capo, the more good the pedal does. Oh, and adding a lower octave, takes all the raw out of a 12 string as well.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 30, 2017,