#1
Hey everyone, and thanks in advance for your help and suggestions.  So I am an intermediate level guitar player, who has devoted lots of time and effort into my playing over the past couple years.  About a month ago I made a decision to purchase a new electric guitar.  Doing research, I found several different models that all seemed to be along the lines of what I was looking for.  Now, when it comes to knowledge about the actual components and features of guitars I am still in the learning process, so therefore it was difficult for me to find exactly what matches my playing style and budget.  My first electric was a Squier Bullet Strat, a decent beginning instrument but not exactly up to my demands.  In any case, when I went to make my purchase at Guitar Center, I was surprised to find that several of the specific models that I was looking for could not be found.  So, I proceeded to try various instruments to find which one I liked the best.  

In the end, I ended up getting a Schecter C-1 Platinum, after trying several others including an Epi Sheraton, an Ibanez RG, and an Epi Les Paul.  I made this decision for several reasons, one of them being that I simply wanted to go in a different direction than I had with the Bullet Strat, and also that the feel of the Schecter was just... nice.   

At first, I loved my Schecter to death, but then I began to have doubts.  Don't get me wrong, this is a great guitar.  But playability and feel aside, the Schecter is simply not geared toward my taste in music.  Normally, I play and listen to a wide variety of genres including alt. rock, blues, classic rock, punk, hard rock, indie, and even some folk/fingerstyle and jazz-type songs.  However, the Schecter seemed to be a one-trick pony, geared toward just one genre - metal.  The electronics, aesthetic and practical elements all seem to contribute to that image.  Not that I don't listen to or play metal - I do, but it's not exactly my all in all.  

This is not to say that I hadn't noticed that before I made the purchase - I just didn't realize how narrow-minded of a guitar it is.  In fact, one reason that I did buy it is because I wanted to experiment with more metal-type music.  But since then I have grown tired of playing one single genre and being confined to that.  Of course, I do play other music on this guitar, but it just doesn't feel (or sound) right.  

So anyway, I'm reconsidering.  I'm looking into trading it in for a used guitar at music go round, and I'm doing more research for potential replacements.  Some of these include an Epiphone Dot, Les Paul, or G-400.  I'm reluctant to go for a Fender here because I want something that's not too much like my Bullet strat, but I might consider some of those as well.

Needless to say, I do have doubts about going through with this.  On the other hand, am I just a victim of GAS, and will never be satisfied with any guitar I have?  Of course I'm apprehensive about trying to do this, since I literally just bought this guitar.  So is it worth it?  And if so, what would you guys recommend?  

Thanks!   
#2
Well, almost any guitar can be used to play almost any genre...if you know what you're doing and your amp & pedals are right for the job. But it IS easier to play some stuff on particular guitars than others, which is part of why some guitars get associated with certain genres.

What's your budget?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
Given that you obviously like the guitar, what danny said, plus there is the option of pickup swapping. You could, for example, go to passive PAF-style with single coil selection. It depends a bit on how much more you want to spend, as opposed to, say a no-cash swap.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jun 29, 2017,
#4
dannyalcatraz 
Thanks for the response!

You bring up a fantastic point about how versatile any guitar can be.  It's very true, too, and I almost think that most of my apprehension about my guitar is brought on by what other people have said rather than my own personal experiences.  That said, it is designed with one genre in mind, but on the other hand, with a decent modeling amp, practically anything is possible.  

As for budget, if I really were to get a new guitar, I would want to trade mine in.  I'm not sure how much I would get for it, but aside from that, I'd like to get something within its price range (around $500 or so).  I would also probably be buying used.  

I will definitely  try and spend more time doing what I can to bring out all the tonal variety of this guitar, though, and hopefully I will be able to figure out how to maximize its versatility.  
#5
Tony Done 
I have considered this, and I think it would be a valuable investment.  The only problem is, my technical knowledge is not sufficient to switch them myself, and I don't really know where to have it done...  In any case, though, what do you think the cost would be to have someone switch the pups for me?
#6
you'd take a beating on the money you spent so trading it in isn't a good idea. honestly that guitar can work fine for most of what you want. it may not do sparkling cleans very well but otherwise it's more about your amp and pedals than the guitar.  i wouldn't say that that guitar was designed with Metal in mind but rather with rock in mind,. it will cover otehr genres though. a local guitar player in a (popular) cover band that does top 40 and country for the most part uses one and it seems to work just fine for him. 

swapping pickups would be a more practical thing to do if you can't live with the sound. 
#8
monwobobbo 
Thanks for the input, it kind of changes my perspective.  I am considering swapping pickups, but I may stick with these... I'll definitely be experimenting with their tones to see what I can do.  
#10
Quote by sinisterspeters
Tony Done
Ok yeah I may have to learn how to do it myself, I'm just concerned about making irreparable mistakes.  

around here tech charges around $20 per pickup but often waves 2nd pu fee if you are getting the guitar setup (and all together if you are a regular). as mentioned you likely would need to change pots as well for passive pickups. 
#12
sinisterspeters
Given this (which I kinda missed):
...the feel of the Schecter was just... nice.


A pickup swap like the others suggested might be your best option: the tones you want in the form you love.

Still though, what's your budget?

And what are you playing through? Were you mostly satisfied with the sounds of your Squier with your current amp?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
I'd keep the Schecter and buy another guitar more suited for the other styles. Actually I would get a Jackson for the metal but . . .

If you can only have 1 guitar for whatever reason can you give us some more info?

What's the amp situation?

Does the Schecter have active EMGs? If so and you don't like or won't use them for the other genres after using the tone and volume knobs you have a few easy options:

- try the 18V mod and open up the headroom unless you already have the X models.

- swap what I'm guessing are 81/85 for 57/66 and see how you like those. They should all use the same quick connect system and you can install them yourself if you can manage a screwdriver.

- put an EMG S or SA or 60 in the bridge

- as the others have suggested swap out the actives for some passives you would like better but see the what amp question first.

- buy an HSS pickup config guitar and keep the bridge humbucker hot for metal - either all active EMGs or passives like Duncans.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#14
The looks of the guitar shouldn't really matter all that much as long as it plays and feels good to you. If the electronics are too "metal" you could always swap them out. If your guitar has actives you could try swapping them for different active pickups ? It would be extremely simple, just unplug the pickups and connect the new ones.  You could sell the ones you take out to make up for what you paid on the new ones.

I have 2 Schecters that I use for all types of music, from clean ambience to metal. Your amp matters a lot in your overall sound, but having the wrong kind of pickups for you can limit you, like if you have high output ceramic pickups and want to play clean music. It wont be the best choice. I'm assuming you have a decent amp so consider swapping out the pickups for something more versatile . 

If that's too much for you to do...then yeah maybe consider trading it in.... BTW I have a 7 string Schecter that sounds awesome, the pickups that came in it were too extremely bright and harsh. I swapped them out and now it's very versatile for any styles of music. It's an amazing guitar.
#15
dannyalcatraz
My budget would probably be in the same range as the schecter (i.e. $500 ish), but at this point I'm becoming more and more convinced that new pups would be the best bet.

My amp is a fender mustang ii, so I have plenty of tonal options there, which I could probably experiment with more. I am satisfied with it, and the sounds that it's produced for various situations with both guitars.


metalmingee

These are good suggestions, I'll see if I can get my hands on some alternative active pickups. Also, I guess it would be possible to get another guitar in addition to this one, but I don't know if I can completely justify that. As far as the amp goes, it's a fender mustang, and, being a modelling amp, has some great capabilities as far as producing a wide ranges of tones.

jedigovnaUG

Thanks for the advice, I think I may try swapping the pickups, but I'd probably want to stick with actives considering the ease of installing those versus passives. I guess I've always thought it would be a daunting task, but based on these replies it doesn't sound too bad...
#16
People have said the 56/77 or whatever they're called lol are really good . Even people who dislike actives say they feel and sound more like passive . I'd love to try some if they weren't so expensive lol .
#17
To be clear: is that $500, or $500 after you trade something in?

Here's my thoughts on the process going forward:

1) budget between $50-100 per pickup of the appropriate type.

2) allocate the rest of the your budget towards buying a better amp, with or without a trade-in. You might have to save up, but it would be worth it.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#18
sinisterspeters I have that same amp, its not crap or anything, but I can tell you that it doesn't really produce all that great of a sound, to me anyway. Replaced it with something better and found that one particular guitar I had that I didn't like all that much became my favorite. If you trade it in you'll most likely regret it later.
Flying in a blue dream
#19
Quote by sinisterspeters

This is not to say that I hadn't noticed that before I made the purchase - I just didn't realize how narrow-minded of a guitar it is.  In fact, one reason that I did buy it is because I wanted to experiment with more metal-type music.  But since then I have grown tired of playing one single genre and being confined to that.  Of course, I do play other music on this guitar, but it just doesn't feel (or sound) right.  

Needless to say, I do have doubts about going through with this.  On the other hand, am I just a victim of GAS, and will never be satisfied with any guitar I have?  Of course I'm apprehensive about trying to do this, since I literally just bought this guitar.  So is it worth it?  And if so, what would you guys recommend?  

Thanks!   

My advice is to trade it in or return it -  avoid "RG type" ( fast neck metal type guitars in the mid range) guitars altogether if you play any type of clean or rootsy type of music ( blues etc.) . If you just bought it you may be able to simply give it back and get something else with little penalty. Those guitars frankly are terrible for anything but metal. 

I hate to say it, but in your budget a Strat is by far the best instrument - an HSS would be ideal. If you can gather up more money than many other options open up to you, such as Musicman's etc. 

You could go with an Epi Les Paul or SG, but my concerns with those is they just never seem to stay in tune - it's like every Epiphone I play, and I played a friend's 335 the other day, is a nightmare for tuning.  If you go that route put it through it's paces to make sure it can keep in tune.
#20
The best thing about Guitar Center (which isn't saying much) is their return policy it was 30 but I think it's now 45 days no questions asked full refund I have bought several guitars both new and used from GC took them home set them up and put them through their paces then returned them if I had regrets. I really shouldn't take more than 45 days or even 30 to realize a guitar is not for you, buyers remorse happens pretty quick for me and I spend the rest of the time tryin to convince myself I made the right decision and sometimes I end up returning it anyway.

If you purchase something else from GC try to figure out if you are going to regret your purchase during the return time frame.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#21
45 days to return new items at GC, and yea...they just take it back no questions. If its beyond that they will give you %60 of what they say they will attempt to sell it for.
Flying in a blue dream
#22
SanDune65 I was pretty sure they upped it to 45 days it's a great way to test drive a guitar!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#23
This is why people have multiple guitars.  There is no one guitar that will do it all and asking any guitar to do that is a lost cause IMHO.  Some guitars will do most style OK but it's best to have 2-3+ to play different styles. Keep the Schecter as is and save money for a second guitar.

If the Schecter has EMG's you might also consider the newer EMG 57-66 combo.  They are still active but sound more versatile and because they're EMG's a monkey could swap them.
#24
A simple pup change and a proper amp and that guitar will do everything you want it to do.  I bought my Schecter Damien Special FR for playing classic rock, classic metal, hair metal, blues, southern rock, instrumental and '80s pop.  All it needed was a pup swap with a nice set of mildly overwound PAF style Alnico V pups (GFS VEH's in my case) and it does it all in spades, cleans and all.  It's not the typical choice of guitar brand/model for the music I love but it's built great, plays great and sounds great for my needs.  You can buy some nice budget friendly pups from Guitar Fetish (GFS) with the quick connect (Kwikplug) system and easily install them yourself with no soldering and GFS supplies nice wiring diagrams to make it even easier.  I would keep the guitar, they are only one trick ponies if you want them to be.  
#25
dannyalcatraz SanDune65 
So if my amp is the weak link here, what would you guys recommend?

Evilnine 
Hm.. I didn't realize that but it's good to know. 

 risingforce1 
Yeah I've also thought about eventually buying another so that I can really have that diversity.  I don't think that would be a bad idea at all, especially since I do still like to play metal/hard rock, which the Schecter does really well.  Also thanks for the pickup suggestion, I'll have to look into getting some of those.  

Way Cool JR. 
Cool!  I am looking at pups on GFS and I like their prices.. Also would you recommend getting a new amp?  I've never really had trouble with my mustang, but based on what others have said it may be partially at fault for the situation...
#26
sinisterspeters

From that genre list, I'd say you're looking for an amp that does nice cleans you can manipulate with pedals and EQing. So, depending on your budget, my usual suspects for amp companies would be (in no particular order):

Fender
Vox
Carvin
Peavey
Quilter
Mesa
Supro
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#28
I recently got a Schecter Hellraiser myself a few months ago and I feel similarly to you @sinisterspeters . I'm not sure what kind of pickups you've got but I've EMG  push pull pickups in mine and my apprehension about the guitar is more a matter of not being sure about liking actives vs pickups.  I like playing a lot of metal stuff, but also classic rock stuff as well. 

As far as far as the guitar goes, I think the quality is awesome. The neck is a lil thicker than I'd like. If it was thinner I'd be able to play w/ my thumb more easily which I like doing, but the width of neck I feel actually makes it nice for solo work, and it's hard to find a guitar w/ a thin enough neck to satisfy me. 

As far as the pickups, I think it's great for playing metal. I like doing a lot of artificial/pinch harmonics when I play and so I needed a guitar that would be good for that. I like playing w/ a lot of those harmonics not just when doing metal, but also  when playing more bluesy Zepplin-ish stuff.  Though people talk about tone w/ passive vs active I think real the difference between active and passive is dynamics, which you won't tell so much from hearing as feel from when you play. When you play with a lot of gain, it's not as much an issue because I think the dynamics come a lot from the gain/sustain on the amp end, but with lighter stuff the feel is different because it's like when you strike the string lightly w/ actives it still comes out quite loud and so you're not able to play quite as sweetly as you would w/ passive pickups. 

Also as far as the sound/tone on my guitar I feel like the single coil mode the one of the bridge sounds ok, but the one on the bridge for me is too trebly tin sounding, so much so as to make it a bit useless. You can play w/ the EQs on the amp to make it sound better, but then the EQs aren't where you want them for the other pickup settings.

I too was hoping for an all in one guitar w/ my schecter, but I feel like it's not actually good for too much except metal.  Though actually when you play with a clean channel with the it does give a decent acoustic guitar sound. It's almost an all in one, prob better than most metal guitars at being all around, but if you focus on playing more classic rock stuff if doesn't quite satisfy.

I'm thinking of getting a gibson but they're a lot of money, and I'm guessing anything I get that'd be better suited for more classic Zeppelin -ish stuff won't be good for metal, so I'm hesitant about trading in this guitar for something else that won't satisfy my desire for playing metal. I feel I should just be satisfied w/ what I have for the time being.

Anyway, like others suggested I'd look at the pickups and try to figure out what type of pickups you like and come to realize as much as we'd both like there's not all in all in one gear. Actually I have yamaha pacifica that was my starter guitar and it took forever to upgrade, because it actually is a pretty awesome all around guitar. I get the sense that cheap-o guitars tend to be all around whereas more expensive ones tend to be more niche. Cheap guitars might not be bad way to go if you're not sure what you want and feel like you want something for some style that you might not use often.  Like if you're thinking of getting a fender buy a cheap squire see how much you like the feel of it and then upgrade to a nice american made.
#29
I've played just about every kind of music on one guitar for the last 30 years.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#31
On the lower end of the pickup budget I proposed, STEWMAC Golden Age, Tesla OPUS humbuckers and Seymour Duncan '59's or Jazzes are pretty nice. I have some Wilkinson pickups stock in some of my guitars, and consider them to be a decent affordable option as well.

Up from that, Railhammer Hypervintage or one of their low/medium output humcutters (their term for HB-sized P90s) would be good, as would most non-signature Lace HBs. (I personally dig the Alumitones, but they can be very bright.)

Beyond that? Rio Grande, Lollar, The Creamery, Bareknuckle and Vintage Vibe all make great HB & HB-sized P90 pickups. The U.K. winders are effectively discounted right now because of the £'s decline vs the $ post-Brexit.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#32
Well it seems like your tonal hunt is divided and like the guitar to a point of still having a serious interest in keeping it.

Just keep it and search for the second guitar instead if you feel that the Schecter feels right and a stratocaster is the second one to have then just do that. Or whatever guitar fits for you.

A Bullet stratocaster is the cheapest intro to Fender so going mim or US would bring quality and tones.

I found my tone hunt to go to ways. The stratocaster came up when I got into Jimi Hendrix and for a while it was the only guitar I had.

Needless to say the dream was my Jackson Rhoads custom so I ended up getting that too.

One guitar gives what the other one does not. I can't say just one as they are equal in my needs for having them since 1995/1997 respectively.
#33
anders.jorgense

Yeah, I am seriously considering getting another guitar as well at this point, since I do play some high gain/distorted stuff, and the schecter really is perfect for that.

Also, this brings up another question - would it be worth it to mod my squier bullet strat, or should I just get a new guitar?
#34
IMHO, you should only mod a guitar if:

1) it feels good in your hands. You can easily change a guitar's sound, but it's expensive to change how it frills.
2) it is objectively well-made enough that you're not going to be dumping significant amounts of money and/or time maintaining it. All guitars need upkeep, bad ones need it all the time. Note: not all inexpensive guitars are badly made, and not all expensive ones are crafted for the ages.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#35
Quote by sinisterspeters
anders.jorgense

Yeah, I am seriously considering getting another guitar as well at this point, since I do play some high gain/distorted stuff, and the schecter really is perfect for that.

Also, this brings up another question - would it be worth it to mod my squier bullet strat, or should I just get a new guitar?


Any mods will devalue a guitar but if it gets better to you by doing so then it's worth it as you will stick with it for longer.

With mods be careful that the cost of the mods do not get to what a better quality Fender stratocaster would cost new or used.

A Mexico mim version is already a more mod friendly version that keeps the value better. Maybe a pickup change towards your preference but that would be it.

If there is no value concern then a mod to a bullet would work if it makes you keep it and play it more.

No one will be interested in paying to much for a bullet new or used even with mods.

Check out strat-talk forum for further information on mods and everything Strat related.
#36
Variety is the spice of life. Keep the schecter to play metal and get something else that suits other styles you like. I have 5 electric guitars, 5 acoustics and a classical.