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#1
Hi,

I can't hear myself play! The want me to play really quiet, but it sucks.
I know of the standard solution which is to run all the instruments into a mixing console, then send monitor output.
We have a PA, and they have suggested that I use a monitor and there is a microphone in front of the amp.
But I don't want someone else controlling my levels.

Isn't there some other solution?
I was thinking I have a mixer that has headphone output, and a line out, but the line out would not work I don't think with the guitar amp would it?
I have an ALESIS MULTIMIX 4. So I can plug my guitar into it, and listen to myself on headphones. I could run a line out to a PA but can I run it out to my guitar amp? 

Any help greatly appreciated. This is almost a deal breaker for me being in the band. I can't stand it.
#2
Welcome to band practice, where the only thing that matters is what the band needs.

There are usually 4 things that are the culprit for these situations. The first is improper eq settings. Guitars thrive in the mids section. A common mistake is setting your levels on your own without the band. This usually leads to lower tones you compensate for the lack of bassist.

The second is amp/player placement. Most of us set the amp right behind us, attenuating some of the sound and making us perceive more bass. The singer is usually farther up front which allows him to get a clearer image of what the crowd hears which is why they are sometimes the first ones to complain about sound. You could solve this by using a stand or angling up your amp to get close to what they hear. You'll loose some perceived thump but gain a more transparent idea of how you sound. Also, you might be too far from your amp.

Third is actual volume. Your speakers or cab may be too small to really compete at a fuller frequency or everyone else is too loud. Best thing is to have someone hear you from a couple feet away in front of you. Also, eq and volume settings require adjustments depending on the room, its materials, and crowd size. One thing you can do is use your amp as a monitor for yourself and mic it to a pa for the actual projection.

Last one... that's just asshole people that want to be too loud.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
Last edited by evening_crow at Jun 29, 2017,
#3
my best friend mixes sound for a living. The setup he uses he gives everyone aviom units with wireless ear buds. This way everyone can adjust what they hear in their ears and he can adjust the sound to what actually sounds the best for the room. He walks around the room with an ipad that can make adjustments to the board so he can get the best sound from every place in the room. Ive sat in some of his rehearsals and before he implemented this system people are always asking to be turned up. You turn one person up then another person wants to be louder and so on and so fourth.

I would suggest you use the pa system. But keep your guitar at like 6 or 7 , and then you can adjust on the fly when you need to have your guitar cut through. Volume pedal or boost pedal would also work i think.
#4
Quote by harmonolithic
But I don't want someone else controlling my levels.

You are going to have major problems functioning in a professional music environment with that kind of view. Someone else has to control your levels out to the PA and in your shared monitors because you need to be busy performing. Send your amp to the PA through a mic, get your monitor level set to where you can monitor your signal (monitoring is not meant to be a professional mix), and then practice/play the gig.

If you want to hear a lot of you but you cannot have your own stage wedge, your band needs to move to In-Ear Monitoring (IEM). Wired units are pretty cheap to integrate, wireless units are a bit pricey, but they are a good investment. Also be sure you are sending a usable signal to FOH. If your amp is crap/you are using a line out without cab simulation, you may be kept down in the mix because your guitar is not producing proper tone.
#5
Just get your amp close to you and point it at your head.  Tilt back, up on a chair, amp stand or whatever.  Proximity is everything and you can play really quiet and still hear yourself once you are close enough.  This way you don't need a wedge, IEMs, or anything else to hear what you are playing.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
Just get your amp close to you and point it at your head.  Tilt back, up on a chair, amp stand or whatever.  Proximity is everything and you can play really quiet and still hear yourself once you are close enough.  This way you don't need a wedge, IEMs, or anything else to hear what you are playing.


Someone once told me that human ears are located on the head, not below the knees.

One of the best improvements I ever made to my home stereo system was elevating the main speakers. Later on down the road, I did likewise with my first amp- putting it on a nightstand made a noticeable improvement in what I heard.

It may not be the solution to your woes, OP, but you will probably notice a difference.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
Get an amp stand. Most players have this issue (whether they know it or not). You can't hear with your ass. Get an adjustable amp stand. I'll bet it solves your problem. 
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#8
Quote by harmonolithic
Hi,

I can't hear myself play! The want me to play really quiet, but it sucks.
I know of the standard solution which is to run all the instruments into a mixing console, then send monitor output.
We have a PA, and they have suggested that I use a monitor and there is a microphone in front of the amp.
But I don't want someone else controlling my levels.


Leave the band.
No, seriously, if you're unwilling to have someone else controlling the mix, you don't belong in a band.

Stage volume is a real issue with most bands and with most sound guys and with a whole lot of venues these days, and it's also a health issue.

If you can't hear your amp there are several solutions.
  1. Get the amp up at ear level. Put it on top of moving cases, other amps, an amp stand, whatever, so that it blasts right into your ears. If you've got it on the floor, you're not going to hear it with the proper balance of treble and lows anyway because most speakers beam treble and you're off axis. This is actually the worst choice, because it will still contaminate vocal mikes, making it difficult to balance.

  2. Get a monitor. Your amp turned up loud competes with the PA, is usually out of time-sync with what's coming out of the PA, blasts down-front audience members to produce really atrocious balance, and it leaks into both vocal mikes and the mikes on other band members' instruments, making controlling the band's sound and making you sound good near impossible.

  3. Get something that plugs into your ears. In-Ear Monitors (IEMs) allow you to hear what you're doing and (depending on the mixer) can be adjusted to give you a mix that's overbalanced for your instrument without your affecting anything else the band is doing. You can have the sound guy turn your mix up or down as necessary so that you can hear what you're doing in the context of the band or even louder than the band is playing.


If you can't adjust, leave the band. I've dumped people who didn't get it. Sound guys have forbidden players who don't abide by their rules to ever book into their clubs again. Easy choice.
Last edited by dspellman at Jun 30, 2017,
#9
harmonolithic I'm interpreting this as multiple issues.

You sorta go on about the pa and monitoring as a solution, but what really is the issue?

You say they want you to play quiet.  So can you clarify, is it that your equipment can't keep up, or is it like you said, your band wants you quiet?  

Sure you can figure out a way to hear yourself better, headphone out from a mixer, pretty basic stuff.  The amp stand mentioned above is a great idea and probably the top solution guitarists seek out.  I'm kind of hearing something different though.  I think at root level you want to play louder. 

This opens a whole nother can of worms.  Genre, how loud is appropriate, are you hard of hearing and you're actually louder than you think?  Do they not want your contributions heard?  There's a lot of variables.  This seems more like a band topic than a gear topic to me.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#10
Quote by dspellman
Leave the band.
No, seriously, if you're unwilling to have someone else controlling the mix, you don't belong in a band.


to be fair though, we've probably all been in that one disfunctional band before where no one can agree on tone and volume levels.  I'm hearing his issues as a product of that more so than an unwillingness to have controlled levels during live playing.  I could be wrong though.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#11
Never been in a band. Orchestra, yes, but not a band.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#12
Get the amp up at ear level. Put it on top of moving cases, other amps, an amp stand, whatever, so that it blasts right into your ears. If you've got it on the floor, you're not going to hear it with the proper balance of treble and lows anyway because most speakers beam treble and you're off axis. This is actually the worst choice, because it will still contaminate vocal mikes, making it difficult to balance.


Hmm. Hadn't thought of that.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
If you can't hear your amp clearly when standing directly in front of it then you need to turn up and they need to to deal with it. You shouldn't need a mixer and you certainly don't need a floor monitor.

Normally you don't mic anything at a practice room - how big is the room?
#14
Quote by Badluckpalms
to be fair though, we've probably all been in that one disfunctional band before where no one can agree on tone and volume levels.  I'm hearing his issues as a product of that more so than an unwillingness to have controlled levels during live playing.  I could be wrong though.  


I think his issue is that he just wants to play loud. "I don't want someone else controlling my levels." There are a lot of noob reactions to their first times in a band. This is one. And then there are the bedroom players who are so used to taking up the entire frequency spectrum and trying to make themselves sound "huge" that they need time to learn that they don't need to be playing all the time ("play 'chick chick' here and then absolutely quiet for two beats" "WHAAAAT???") and that they lose bottom end when they turn up ("Wait, I can't get my toan! Something's wrong with my amp!"). These are growing pains (hopefully)...


Quote by reverb66
If you can't hear your amp clearly when standing directly in front of it then you need to turn up and they need to to deal with it. You shouldn't need a mixer and you certainly don't need a floor monitor.

Normally you don't mic anything at a practice room - how big is the room?


Welcome to the '60's. "They need to deal with it" will usually get you tossed.

We have people in a practice room who don't bother bringing amps at all. Bass player has a preamp, guitar player has a modeler, keyboard player is direct into the board. Not unusual to have the drummer playing electric drums (nearly everyone these days has mesh trigger things on their drum heads even if they've got an acoustic kit, and it's mostly kick and cymbals that are miked) and even in practice they're behind plex. We're usually playing *facing* the PA and the drummer, and if there IS anyone with an amp, it's opposite us across the room with that stuff. Behind us is a whole lot of sound-deadening material. That way we get to hear what we sound like altogether.

How are you practicing? Are you pretending you're playing for someone with the amps and drums on the floor behind you, and you're facing the garage door?
#15
Quote by dspellman
I think his issue is that he just wants to play loud. "I don't want someone else controlling my levels." There are a lot of noob reactions to their first times in a band. This is one.  And then there are the bedroom players who are so used to taking up the entire frequency spectrum and trying to make themselves sound "huge" that they need time to learn that they don't need to be playing all the time ("play 'chick chick' here and then absolutely quiet for two beats" "WHAAAAT???") and that they lose bottom end when they turn up ("Wait, I can't get my toan! Something's wrong with my amp!"). These are growing pains (hopefully)...


That's fair.  I've seen both scenarios - heck I've been that guy.  

I remember seeing a youtube video where someone separated the tracks on some metal songs and had people critique it.  They all thought it was great in the mix, but they thought the guitar tone sucked after hearing the solo tracks.  Sorta speaks to this.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#16
Quote by Badluckpalms
That's fair.  I've seen both scenarios - heck I've been that guy.  

I remember seeing a youtube video where someone separated the tracks on some metal songs and had people critique it.  They all thought it was great in the mix, but they thought the guitar tone sucked after hearing the solo tracks.  Sorta speaks to this.  


Yeah, it's sort of like listening to the "vocals only" of Dave in Van Halen songs.

Or like listening to dannyalcatraz (or anyone, really) play just his part for an orchestra.

Last edited by dspellman at Jun 30, 2017,
#17
dspellman

Yeah, as a cellist, I was essentially part of the "rhythm section"- meaning if you just heard my part, you probably wouldn't recognize the piece. Even with chamber music, where it's just a foursome, the cello's role is more support than driving the melody, so a lot of what I play would come across as "repetitive"

The only times you'd think differently was with pieces composed with the cello as a primary or solo instrument..
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#18
Quote by dannyalcatraz
dspellman

Yeah, as a cellist, I was essentially part of the "rhythm section"- meaning if you just heard my part, you probably wouldn't recognize the piece. Even with chamber music, where it's just a foursome, the cello's role is more support than driving the melody, so a lot of what I play would come across as "repetitive"

The only times you'd think differently was with pieces composed with the cello as a primary or solo instrument..


As Bill Cosby famously stated, "There's always room for cello!"
Especially when they're hot and in attack mode.
And like to play dress-up.



Last edited by dspellman at Jun 30, 2017,
#19
Sometimes there is just no talking to someone who is not trying to fit in with the bands sound. I was in a very good band (probably the best one I was ever in) but our lead guitarist played so loud that we had trouble getting repeat gigs. He was a really excellent player but he played everything at max volume. The club owners would say to me "You guys are great but you play too loud and my bartenders can't hear the customers to get drink orders". The bass player and I both continually asked him to turn it down and his solution was to go out and by a second amp (Seymour Duncan Convertible 100 amps) so he could have one on each side of the stage. He said if he was more "balanced" he wouldn't have to play as loud. So much for that idea. He just sounded louder on my side of the stage. Finally one night the bass player (who was a very good lead singer) just turned to the lead player and said "I'm done after tonight. I can't take it any longer". I couldn't talk him out of leaving. About 6 months later I left because the situation just got worse. I would ride home from gigs with my head ringing and when I got home and tried to sleep I could still hear a low rumble in my head. I will never play in a situation like that again. 
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#20
What everyone else has said, basically.  If you're playing in a band then you are not the best person to judge what your level should be in relation to the rest of the band.  In rehearsals I'd suggest you all stand in a circle with your amp just behind you and pointed up at you.  When playing live you just have to give control of the levels to someone else.  Once the levels have been set at sound check DO NOT TOUCH YOUR OWN LEVELS.  If it doesn't sound great to you on stage, tough.  It probably sounds fine off stage.
#21
Quote by Rickholly74
Sometimes there is just no talking to someone who is not trying to fit in with the bands sound. I was in a very good band (probably the best one I was ever in) but our lead guitarist played so loud that we had trouble getting repeat gigs. He was a really excellent player but he played everything at max volume. The club owners would say to me "You guys are great but you play too loud and my bartenders can't hear the customers to get drink orders". The bass player and I both continually asked him to turn it down and his solution was to go out and by a second amp (Seymour Duncan Convertible 100 amps) so he could have one on each side of the stage. He said if he was more "balanced" he wouldn't have to play as loud. So much for that idea. He just sounded louder on my side of the stage. Finally one night the bass player (who was a very good lead singer) just turned to the lead player and said "I'm done after tonight. I can't take it any longer". I couldn't talk him out of leaving. About 6 months later I left because the situation just got worse. I would ride home from gigs with my head ringing and when I got home and tried to sleep I could still hear a low rumble in my head. I will never play in a situation like that again. 

Yep.  About 5 years ago we invited a guitarist to join us.  He is one of those musical savants that intuitively knows 10,000 songs by memory all in the original key with all of the little intros and fills.  He spent a LOT of time in the bedroom with original recordings and had very little live gig experience.  He brought a lot to the table of a cover band. 

 The problems were that he played through a Twin at full tilt all the time so everyone was deaf after every practice or performance.  Several venues said "Nope sorry guys, you are way too loud.  I can't book you here any more".  He was also a cold fish on stage and did not relate to other players or the audience at all.  He also HAD to play every song in the original arrangement he learned it with no room for improvisation or a fresh arrangement of the song.  It lasted 2 years until we simply ran out of gigs that would hire us. 

We did a little shuffle in the lineup and the band is much better now with a great groove.  We are able to play at a whisper or fill a 10,000 seat stadium with the turn of a few knobs and faders.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jul 2, 2017,
#22
Lot of good info in this thread I suggest you follow it !! Especially about the Band and PA
Info , if you ever want be in a good Band follow the above advice
#24
evening_crow Thanks for your response but I was looking for a solution in the form of gear. In order for anyone to play they need to hear themselves. I do have resources such as a PA with a monitor, but the problem with that is you have to rely on someone else to find the right levels. I think I found a solution, but it's a little more elaborate than what I was hoping for. The missing piece seems to be a box called a "reamp". The re-amp will take the line level out from my personal mixer and send it direct to the amplifier, thus avoiding having to rely on the PA monitor.  I was hoping to find something less elaborate, like a box that would let you monitor the signal from your guitar then pass the signal to the amp. The idea of having to set up my little mixer, buying a reamp then setting all that up seems to be to cumbersome. As far as the band goes fortunately they are nice people, and I'm fortunate that we do have a PA with monitors so I could use that as a solution, I just don't think the person operating the PA is competent or cares enough to make sure that my levels are adjusted, and I don't want to look like a Goldy Locks "Hey can you turn up my monitors?" "That's too loud!", "That's just right."
#25
N8dagreat3 Thanks for your response. I'm thinking of getting in ear monitors, but since we are not gigging yet, it's kind of expensive to just start in a band.  The missing piece seems to be a box called a "reamp". The re-amp will take the line level out from my personal mixer and send it direct to the amplifier, thus avoiding having to rely on the PA monitor. That also is kind of expensive, and I'm not sure it would work. Unfortunately it seems there is not a market for garage band level products that let you monitor yourself directly. Maybe I will consider features when I get my next amp. Fortunately there is a PA with monitoring capability but that can be difficult to since my guitar is not going directly into the PA, and they are using a microphone. It's too risky, the guy running the PA is not that good.
#26
Will Lane Thanks for your response.  If someone is controlling my levels and it's way to loud, or way to quiet that will be a deal breaker. It's not my fault. I was getting at in ear monitoring, but it's too pre-mature right now since we are not gigging very often. I was looking for something similar,   The missing piece seems to be a box called a "reamp". The re-amp will take the line level out from my personal mixer and send it direct to the amplifier, thus avoiding having to rely on the PA monitor. 
#28
Rickholly74 I type a lot in my day job and I did not want the post to be elaborate. The room that we rehearse in is very small and the amp it tucked between other amps in the room. I have thought about stacking the amp on top of the PA amp that is behind me. I think an electronic solution is what I am looking for, and I haven't found anything that would work other than using IEM and using the PA monitors, but that is going to require me either plugging the guitar directly into the PA (I have a direct box), or using a mic going into the PA where the levels can be adjusted by someone other than me.  The missing piece seems to be a box called a "reamp". The re-amp will take the line level out from my personal mixer and send it direct to the amplifier, thus avoiding having to rely on the PA monitor. 
#29
Quote by Rickholly74
Sometimes there is just no talking to someone who is not trying to fit in with the bands sound. I was in a very good band (probably the best one I was ever in) but our lead guitarist played so loud that we had trouble getting repeat gigs. He was a really excellent player but he played everything at max volume. The club owners would say to me "You guys are great but you play too loud and my bartenders can't hear the customers to get drink orders". The bass player and I both continually asked him to turn it down and his solution was to go out and by a second amp (Seymour Duncan Convertible 100 amps) so he could have one on each side of the stage. He said if he was more "balanced" he wouldn't have to play as loud. So much for that idea. He just sounded louder on my side of the stage. Finally one night the bass player (who was a very good lead singer) just turned to the lead player and said "I'm done after tonight. I can't take it any longer". I couldn't talk him out of leaving. About 6 months later I left because the situation just got worse. I would ride home from gigs with my head ringing and when I got home and tried to sleep I could still hear a low rumble in my head. I will never play in a situation like that again. 

That sounds awfully familiar.. And it's always everyone else's fault, isn't it? the cymbals cover up my treble frequencies... the bass makes it impossible to hear my low notes... I can't hear my lead while the singer is singing - that's my favourite one. Like, seriously?
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#31
dspellman I'm looking for a solution similar to In Ear Monitoring but not relying on the PA.  This is my current set up Guitar > Effects > AMP > Mic > PA Mixer > Monitor. The person running the mixer has offered to turn up the Monitor but I hear nothing. My next steps are 1. Get an in ear monitor and hope that the person operating the PA is competent enough to set the levels right, and that there is no bleed from the other guitar through the mic. (I don't see that as a real solution because I think even going through a monitor facing me I won't be able to hear myself well enough). It's really the same as going through an amp.
2. Use a mixer with a headphone jack, then run the guitar directly into the PA.  Guitar > PA Mixer > In Ear Monitors. Again I would have to cross my fingers and I hope I didn't waste money on an IEM system.  3. What I'm doing right now, which is trying to find a way to directly monitor my guitar without going into the PA. Only solution I have found is Guitar > Personal Mixer > A thing called "reamp" look it up. > Amp.  But I was hoping to find this:  Guitar > (a device that you can plug headphones into that sends the signal to the amp also) > AMP.
#32
Quote by harmonolithic
dspellman I'm looking for a solution similar to In Ear Monitoring but not relying on the PA.  This is my current set up Guitar > Effects > AMP > Mic > PA Mixer > Monitor. The person running the mixer has offered to turn up the Monitor but I hear nothing. My next steps are 1. Get an in ear monitor and hope that the person operating the PA is competent enough to set the levels right, and that there is no bleed from the other guitar through the mic. (I don't see that as a real solution because I think even going through a monitor facing me I won't be able to hear myself well enough). It's really the same as going through an amp.
2. Use a mixer with a headphone jack, then run the guitar directly into the PA.  Guitar > PA Mixer > In Ear Monitors. Again I would have to cross my fingers and I hope I didn't waste money on an IEM system.  3. What I'm doing right now, which is trying to find a way to directly monitor my guitar without going into the PA. Only solution I have found is Guitar > Personal Mixer > A thing called "reamp" look it up. > Amp.  But I was hoping to find this:  Guitar > (a device that you can plug headphones into that sends the signal to the amp also) > AMP.


Reamping isn't going to do it for you; that's not what reamping is all about.

Most modelers have head phone jacks, as well as outputs to a PA.

Older Line 6 Pod XT:


Newer Line 6 Helix:


You can set up an In Ear Monitor (including wireless) directly from the headphone jack if you wish. The better in ear monitor buds effectively eliminate extraneous noise (including other stage noise). In fact, the better ones allow you to select how much ambient you want to allow in (obviously, you want *some*). They can be molded to your ear canal.



If you're close-miking your amp, you're not going to get much bleed from the other instruments, though there *can* be some picked up. If you really want to make sure that you're not getting *any* bleed, it's worth either setting up your amp in an isolated area away from the rest of the band (see the two small amps tucked in behind the Vox Super Beatles? The Vox are there for show, the actual sound going to the PA comes from the two small amps).



Or using something like the modelers, above. Those don't use a microphone, obviously, so you can either have your sound guy run just your stuff directly back to your IEMs or you can have him allow a percentage of the rest of the mix into your bus.
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 2, 2017,
#33
My all time favorite amps (from an appearance standpoint). The VOX Super Beatle amps looked amazing on stage. I had a VOX Royal Guardsman in the late 60's (my first big amp). It sounded pretty bad because it was one on the American made ones from Thomas Organ and were not at all made like the British Vox amps but it was impressive looking. I later had a used Vox Berkeley (2 X 10) that actually sounded good and I used it for a few years. Thanks for triggering a memory. 

Now back to the original thread. Sorry for this interruption.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jul 2, 2017,
#34
dspellman This is what I was looking for. It turns out I have a Digitech RP 500 that has a headphone jack. I definitely need a headphone amp or IEM though it's not very loud.  As far as reamp goes. I was just thinking that my mixer has a guitar imput, and headphone output, but I don't think I can run the mixer output to the amp or can I?  I think I have to use something like reamp if I wanted to do that. But I will try headphones. I hope I can find the right amp for not too much money. It's expensive having all these guitars, amps and gear. 
#35
Quote by harmonolithic
dspellman This is what I was looking for. It turns out I have a Digitech RP 500 that has a headphone jack. I definitely need a headphone amp or IEM though it's not very loud.  As far as reamp goes. I was just thinking that my mixer has a guitar imput, and headphone output, but I don't think I can run the mixer output to the amp or can I?  I think I have to use something like reamp if I wanted to do that. But I will try headphones. I hope I can find the right amp for not too much money. It's expensive having all these guitars, amps and gear. 


And by headphones (until you can get in-ear monitors) we do NOT mean four buck earbuds like the ones used by your iPod/iPad/iPhone/iGizmo. You'll probably want over-the-ear headphones (Sony 7506, AKG 240, Sennheiser 280, BeyerDynamic 770 or similar) that have impedance of 60 ohms or less. Says so on page 7 of your RP500 Manual.
#36
harmonolithic - I believe what you mean by set your levels is for the monitor. To go on stage and the PA person hasn't set the monitors loud enough for you or something?

An ABY box with levels that splits your signal will allow you to send your signal to other places than the PA. Such as you own monitor. You control your own levels on that line. Boss LS2 + Monitor. You can even slip a volume pedal in there.
Dean MAB1. Epiphone Annihilation V. EVH 5150III 50. Orange PPC112. Earthquaker devices - The Warden, Arrows, Acapulco Gold, Levitation, Night Wire. EHX Big Muff Pi Tone Wicker. Polytune mini. e906. SM57. Focusrite. LINUX!
#37
Deermonic The person who is running the PA offered to provide monitors, and I asked, but no sound from the monitors. I'm kind of new to the band, so I'm trying to solve some of these issues while rehearsing by myself, then iron them out when we are gigging, because I don't want to sound too picky. He complained that my guitar  was too loud. I said that I normally would not play that loud, but I don't have a set list so I'm figuring out sounds as I go.  I'll look into an ABY box, I think that's what I was looking for also.  I found out my effects box does have a headphone out, so that's good.
#38
dspellman Ok I was just trying the headhones to see if I could get a signal while I was sending a signal to the amp and it worked. I will try those headphones.
#39
Quote by harmonolithic
Deermonic The person who is running the PA offered to provide monitors, and I asked, but no sound from the monitors. I'm kind of new to the band, so I'm trying to solve some of these issues while rehearsing by myself, then iron them out when we are gigging, because I don't want to sound too picky. He complained that my guitar  was too loud. I said that I normally would not play that loud, but I don't have a set list so I'm figuring out sounds as I go.  I'll look into an ABY box, I think that's what I was looking for also.  I found out my effects box does have a headphone out, so that's good.

Quote by Deermonic
harmonolithic - I believe what you mean by set your levels is for the monitor. To go on stage and the PA person hasn't set the monitors loud enough for you or something?

An ABY box with levels that splits your signal will allow you to send your signal to other places than the PA. Such as you own monitor. You control your own levels on that line. Boss LS2 + Monitor. You can even slip a volume pedal in there.

An ABY box only let's you switch to two outputs. Are there ones that really split the signal? I don't think I want to spend 100 for that, then spend 100 for a headphone amp, then 100 for the headphones right  now. I think I will just use the digitech, and my mixer has a headphone amp for my cheap headphones. Also over ear headphones I don't see as a solution at all. Then I won't be able to hear the band. 
#40
A DMFX w/headphones is the only reasonable technology solution to your dilemma.  Anything else will just result in crushing complications...  Or save your $$ and just move your amp closer to your ears.  Proximity is everything.  
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
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