#1
I have found myself losing interest with bass these past few days and I was wondering if it's temporary or permanently losing interest which in that case it's not meant to be BTW I am a teen in a band so what would be the best way to go about it
#2
How long have you been playing? 

Do you feel in a rut?
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#4
So, are you playing artists you like?
I've only been playing bass for a few months, and am closing in on 2 years with guitar. Some days, I'm not motivated to go at it, so I don't. (Or, I'm just beat with responsibilities of marriage and kids.) 

There's nothing wrong with not having an interest. The cause should be the focal point. Life? Material your playing? Technique? I like metal, but having a perspective in jazz, blues, or country has helped. I even checked out the bass line to Ludacris' "Move Bitch". (It's on the G string). I'm not a virtuoso, but bouncing around genres helps introduce new concepts and techniques. 
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#5
Quote by jay7801jf
I have found myself losing interest with bass these past few days and I was wondering if it's temporary or permanently losing interest which in that case it's not meant to be BTW I am a teen in a band so what would be the best way to go about it


You might think about why you picked up the Bass to begin with.
#6
I read an interview with I think it was Bill Evans, who said sometimes you just have to take a break and come back with a new perspective on your playing.  Everyone gets burnt out if they do something for an extended period of time.   Also learn to enjoy all of the process of your learning to play--and don't look at some parts, like learning difficult songs or theory, as a chore.

Also, find new people to jam with occasionally.  You will learn something from everyone you play with and it can bring fresh ideas and enthusiasm to your playing.  It will also teach you tonnes.
#8
You're a teen in a band and have only been playing for a year. Have you gigged yet or is this just a jam every now and again? Are you playing covers or writing your own stuff? Did you choose bass or was it someone else's idea? Do you play stuff for yourself at home or practice anything not related to the band? 

There are a variety of rewards for all the effort of learning bass. For me it is about live performance, there's nothing like the rush of walking into a room full of strangers and getting them all dancing singing and smiling. I still get pleasure playing something I couldn't do a year ago too, there's joy in improving your craft. Then there's the pleasure you get from working with a bunch of people to make something greater than the sum of it's parts, working with friends towards a common goal is great. If you are making original music then there is the pleasure in creating something.


The joy you get depends upon the effort you put in so think about what you want out of this and concentrate your efforts there. 
#9
Much depends on the genre of the music that you play, without being offensive if it is music that requires mainly root note bashing then you will become bored and easily dissolusioned, I was lucky as I gigged throughout Beatlemania and beyond, Dance Orchestra, resident in a Trad club and playing in Rock, Soft Rock, Country, Resident Musician and umpteen other styles and I'm still hungry to play.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#10
 If you enjoy it, you'll want to spend a lot of time learning it. If you find yourself making excuses not to practice, maybe you should choose another instrument. 
#11
Ask the Master!



Signs point to yes.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#12
From my own experience, I thought I was losing interest in everything at this stage.  In retrospect, I think I just wanted to try everything and the idea of sticking to one thing frustrated me.  I will also add (again my experience) that often in the very early stage you find three types of people: the person who wants to play bass because they absolutely love it and want to excel at it; the person who views it as a transitional instrument before playing guitar; the person who thinks being in a band sounds fun and they think the learning curve is less on bass.  I find a lot of new players end up being in category 3.

If I'm wrong, then put on some Motorhead and start worshiping Lemmy.  Let it speak to you, and you and your bass will become one.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#13
Quote by Badluckpalms
From my own experience, I thought I was losing interest in everything at this stage.  In retrospect, I think I just wanted to try everything and the idea of sticking to one thing frustrated me.  I will also add (again my experience) that often in the very early stage you find three types of people: the person who wants to play bass because they absolutely love it and want to excel at it; the person who views it as a transitional instrument before playing guitar; the person who thinks being in a band sounds fun and they think the learning curve is less on bass.  I find a lot of new players end up being in category 3.

If I'm wrong, then put on some Motorhead and start worshiping Lemmy.  Let it speak to you, and you and your bass will become one.  

When I started playing Bass back in 1962 90% of bassists were failed guitarists including me. One thing that we did have though was chord knowledge which helped no end in playing meaningful Bass instead of just hanging on the root note.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#14
Quote by Tony Done
Do you play, or are you interested in any other instruments?  Diversity is what has kept me interested for 50-odd years. The trade-off is that you become a jack-of-all trades, master of none.

Have to say, this is my lot in life. However, the upside is having a view on how your primary instrument relates to others. I've had some dots connect since getting a bass. My boys have a fickle interest in drums, so I probably will use that to acquire an e-drum kit for home use (and not piss off the neighbors). 
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#15
If you're in a rut, grab a guitar in free time or a piano or learn singing for the fun of it.  There have been times I dont even want to pick up the guitar but I'll use it as accompaniment for singing and the practice of singing and playing makes it entertaining again.  Try some weird rhythms and time signatures too...a change in time signatures can make you uncomfortable and get the brain working.  Something like 7/8 will mess with you a bit
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"
#16
If you love what you do, you'll do what you love. That being said, everyone gets stale sometimes. Either you just keep playing and ride it out, or you realize that maybe you just don't love it, and that's fine. But a year is almost nothing in terms of giving it a go. Unless you're positive you don't love it at all, stick it out. Nobody's 'on' all the time.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



silentfall.bandcamp.com
#17
Find a song that challenges you as a player. Even if it's not in a genre your a huge fan of. When I was a teenager and starting on the bass (I had been playing guitar for several years) in the late 90s, Ska was still a big thing. Playing some of those songs re-energized my practice, and I learned how to write better basslines by dissecting what I was playing. To this day, when I join a band I primarily play bass.
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