#1
Hey, first off thanks for reading. This is really important to me because it is causing me much frustration.

My strings are too tight on my guitar! Help! I just got it restrung at Guitar Center and I got into an argument with the manager because of pricing and strings so I don't want to go back because I asked the repair guy so many questions he ended up making me pay for the strings even though he told me it would be included. Well anyways as you can tell I am new to guitar stringing. I am a classically trained piano player and percussionist and this is extremely new to me.

The guitar strings are now too tight. He adjusted the truss rod counter clock wise 2 times at the store, the strings are so tight I am afraid to turn it either counter clockwise or clockwise to fix the problem. What should i do?

Thank you so much for reading and listening to me vent out a little bit ha!  


Edit: so i guess i asked for all this below. the reason why i was so pissed off was bc guitar center includes free strings and the tech then revoked said strings after i came back 2 days later and got pissed off at me when i mentioned that he told me there were free strings involved. i ended up talking to the manager and he pretended that it was only with a setup. i went to another guitar center and in fact they come with free strings. i then called the previous store and spoke to the same manager and he was giving me a run-around on what happened and said that the other store was lying.... and that he would call and have it settled. i tolld him that i was pretty angry at what happened, saying that i would get free strings and all since im on such a budget, and he started lying and said still that the strings are only with a setup. i got pissed off at him and said fuck you, which was prolly a mistake. but, anyways i was right and he was wrong and i went back inside the 2nd guitar center and they cleared everything up and called him to see why they were lying and trying to get me to get a setup when all i wanted was a stringing.

that was long.. i also fixed the action by turning the truss rod.


Conclusion:  i was lied to at guitar center then became very skeptical of the 'job' the guy did on the guitar. i fixed the action and the reason why i felt the strings were so tight was because i haven't been able to play for about 2 weeks because i lost my saddle so i couldn't restring the guitar. also the dickhead repair man told me i should probably change the way i play since the string is buzzing..... that just sounds dumb to me. so i told him that he put the shims on one side when the original way it was evenly spread out. he just was overall pissed off at me because it was really busy and i was asking questions. btw it is Times Square NYC store so it's busy I get that but he didn't have to be a dick about the whole thing. especially when he got in my face about it at the register when i was paying.
Last edited by ikemac13 at Jul 3, 2017,
#2
Hey ikemac13 !

Before we move on, make sure your guitar is in tune. Use a tuner, a tuner app on your phone etc.


Strings are too tight? Do you mean the "action" of the guitar?
Action refers to the height of the strings away from the fingerboard (the long neck with dots and metal strips). If the strings are hard to press down the action may be too high, meaning the dingbat at the store has set it up completely wrong.

You also mentioned turning clockwise/anticlockwise. Is the turning bit below the neck, at the sound hole, using an allen key? If it is, that turning thing is called a "trussrod".
A trussrod is basically a metal bar within the neck that adjusts action. Turning the allen key counter clockwise will 'loosen' the rod, and bring the neck forward, which will mean there'll be a C curve in the neck, meaning higher string action. Turning the allen key clockwise, however, will 'tighten' the rod, bringing the neck down (a backbowed position) which will lower the string action. If you're confused, always remember Lefty Loosey Righty Tighty!

In this case, from where your explaination leads to, for me, the store guy might have taken the piss and raised the action of the strings. If you havr your allen key, put it into the hole for the trussrod and turn clockwise (right, tight), to bring curve of the neck down and lower the action. BE CAUTIOUS THOUGH, small adjustments, small turns. A small turn may be all you need, so make an adjustment, pause, and try playing. If the strings still feel too high, turn more. A half turn should be more then enough I guess.
((If you keep turning and nothing happens, stop turning. You might break the trussrod.))

If you're afraid to do this, just send the guitar to a guitar store and let them sort it out. Might be a combination of shit neck bow and a saddle too high. (Saddle is the plastic strip at the bottom bridge of the guitar, above the pins.)

Hope this helps, other geeks feel free to chip in if I haven't covered something, thanks!!


p.s strings can never be "too tight feeling". The only two things that may cause this is a thicker gauge (size) of string, or, too high tension on the strings, which might see them snap.
Last edited by AORNova at Jul 1, 2017,
#3
Quote by ikemac13
Hey, first off thanks for reading. This is really important to me because it is causing me much frustration.

My strings are too tight on my guitar! Help! I just got it restrung at Guitar Center and I got into an argument with the manager because of pricing and strings so I don't want to go back because I asked the repair guy so many questions he ended up making me pay for the strings even though he told me it would be included. Well anyways as you can tell I am new to guitar stringing. I am a classically trained piano player and percussionist and this is extremely new to me.
Well, you've managed to omit almost all of the relevant information, and share you're feelings. Which, although we welcome such participation, "feelings" pretty much useless for us to attempt to cure your woes.

I've read your post, and it leaves me quite confused, along with more questions than potential answers.

Maybe I'm newsy, but why were you expecting free strings? Also, what was the "relief' setting of the neck before the tech jerked off into the truss rod?

If we suppose the neck was bent back to the point where it was bowing upward in the middle of the neck, the "action" of the guitar would be likely very low, rendering the guitar very easy to play. Putting the correct relief setting in under these conditions would raise the action, (strings further from the neck), and now it would be harder to play.

We don't know what gauge strings either the old or new sets were, and again, no info coming from you about that.

Was your guitar tuned correctly from E2 to E4 ("concert pitch") to begin with? Lower tunings yield less fingering force required

Quote by ikemac13
The guitar strings are now too tight. He adjusted the truss rod counter clock wise 2 times at the store, the strings are so tight I am afraid to turn it either counter clockwise or clockwise to fix the problem. What should i do?
You should read this guide I'm going to link for you, a few times, cover to cover, so that both you and we members can communicate intelligently, and hopefully, that will lead to a solution. Go ye here: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

Quote by ikemac13
Thank you so much for reading and listening to me vent out a little bit ha!  
You're quite welcome to vent whenever you feel the need. There is unfortunately one drawback, now it's my turn...

I've had this discussion many times. While other members are a bit reluctant to accept, "too tight", I realize you're probably referring to too much fretting force.

A couple of things have to happen. First and foremost, the guitar has to be setup properly, with a string set of a gauge you can manage. (Not too thin though, we need to build callouses on the fingertips).

After those conditions are met, you have to be willing to put in the effort to build a different type of finger conditioning. Arguably, if you think the steel string is too tough, and it might interfere with your piano work, you could consider a nylon string type of guitar. "Classical piano", might require you to play a "classical guitar".

Other than that, the steel string flat top is a, "no pain, no gain" proposition. Many times I have told budding guitarists, if the guitar causes you too much pain, then take up the piano. I mean absolutely no disrespect to pianists having said that, but still, facts is facts. The guitar is a different discipline altogether.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 1, 2017,
#4
The guide Cranky gave should update your terminology regarding guitar stuff, probably something you should have looked for before pissing off the tech with too many questions.  Keep in mind to never tune a guitar above standard concert.
Might be a good idea to go back to Guitar Center and apologize, a novice needs a tech in good standing!
#5
Just supporting what has been said above - make sure the guitar is properly set up, including the nut (which hasn't been mentioned yet), use a manageable string gauge, and "no pain, no gain" with steel strings. It isn't just calluses, the nerve endings also retreat in the tips of your fingers, making them insensitive to surface pain, and it all takes time.
#6
Quote by AORNova
Hey ikemac13 !


A trussrod is basically a metal bar within the neck that adjusts action. Turning the allen key counter clockwise will 'loosen' the rod, and bring the neck forward, which will mean there'll be a C curve in the neck, meaning higher string action. Turning the allen key clockwise, however, will 'tighten' the rod, bringing the neck down (a backbowed position) which will lower the string action. If you're confused, always remember Lefty Loosey Righty Tighty!



thank you man- he tried to raise the action since the low e string was still buzzing but i later found out that -=((shit idk what its called)  the piece on the neck where the string is held)) is like shaved down or something so he said he has to fill it... for a $50 set up... can't afford.

i lowered the action back down it is better now and the e string buzz is = to that of when the action was raised.
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, you've managed to omit almost all of the relevant information, and share you're feelings. Which, although we welcome such participation, "feelings" pretty much useless for us to attempt to cure your woes.

I've read your post, and it leaves me quite confused, along with more questions than potential answers.

Maybe I'm newsy, but why were you expecting free strings? Also, what was the "relief' setting of the neck before the tech jerked off into the truss rod?

If we suppose the neck was bent back to the point where it was bowing upward in the middle of the neck, the "action" of the guitar would be likely very low, rendering the guitar very easy to play. Putting the correct relief setting in under these conditions would raise the action, (strings further from the neck), and now it would be harder to play.


the strings are 12 gauge. i kinda made an edit and conclusion to the whole guitar center story too lol. it's up ^ in my original post to answer anymore questions  
#8
Quote by ikemac13
the strings are 12 gauge. i kinda made an edit and conclusion to the whole guitar center story too lol.it's up ^ in my original post to answer anymore questions  
OK, those are "acoustic lights", and it's what most guitars ship with. You could in fact, try a set of "custom lights", (.011 to .052) next time you string up, That "only 1/1000 difference" makes a pretty sizable change in playing characteristic, more than you might expect.

Moving on to your buzzy E string, (and I'm assuming we're talking about, "the big fat guy", the E-6.

Anyone of a number of things could be causing the buzz, and FWIW, too heavy a touch is one of them. That said, let's try something to rule touch out. Play the string at every fret using a light to heavy touch. See if it buzzes at one or two specific frets, or across its entire length. Get back to us on that, it will help with a diagnosis.

Moving on, I'm still confused about the free strings issue. First, I've never bought so much as a guitar pick from Guitar Center itself. The majority of my equipment purchases are made from their internet affiliate, "Musician's Friend". Was this a new guitar bought from this store, and a string job should have come with it?

OK, hindsight is always 20/20, and backseat drivers are the best in the world, but IMHO, a Guitar Center in the middle of Times Square NYC, is possibly the worst place in the world to buy a guitar, save for perhaps some back street cart vendor in Shanghai, China.They likely deal with scads of tourists, and treat each customer as though they'll never see therm again...

So yes, I have more questions: did you buy the guitar new or used? Did you buy it at that particular GC? How long have you had it? And just as a matter of idle curiosity, what the hell kind/brand of guitar is it?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 3, 2017,
#9
yeejiat99
The guitar dude filled what?
edit: He was talking about the nut of the guitar, if I'm correct? The rectangular piece on the top neck of the guitar, white in color, where each string goes through a slot. If the nut was shaved at the bottom before (why lol) then it might just be too low now. A shim below the nut would fix it, but I'd rather change the nut to a new one imo.. (and I'm not sure what the guitar guy means by fill, how do you fill a nut to raise it..?)

Like Captcranky said, to determine the magnitude of the issue, play every string on every fret of the guitar. For example, play (pick string normally, not too hard or too soft) the Low E string on the first fret. If it buzzes, move down to the 2nd fret, keep moving down until it stops buzzing. Do this for all the strings. If it buzzes all the way down the neck you probably need a setup bad.
However..
if the strings are only buzzing on the first few frets, and you cannot afford a set-up, and loosening the trussrod doesn't help, try restringing the guitar to heavier gauge (thickness) of strings. If you have .12 Lights now, try .13 mediums. "Thicker" strings would have more tension, give more pull to the neck and *might* just reduce the buzzing (less chance for the strings to shimmer and buzz on the frets). But they are harder to play, because they're thicker and have higher tension = harder to press. And you also run the risk of slowly warping the neck, lifting the bridge, ectra ectra.....

But heck, seriously. If it sounds bad, and has a botched nutjob, better to send it for a set-up. It'll help make the guitar play great again.
Last edited by AORNova at Jul 3, 2017,
#10
Quote by Captaincranky
Moving on to your buzzy E string, (and I'm assuming we're talking about, "the big fat guy", the E-6.

Yes.


Anyone of a number of things could  be causing the buzz, and FWIW, too heavy a touch is one of them. That said, let's try something to rule touch out. Play the string at every fret using a light to heavy touch. See if it buzzes at one or two specific frets, or across its entire length. Get back to us on that, it will help with a diagnosis.

it stops buzzing at 14th fret. and oddly enough doesn't really buzz at all on 4th or 5th fret. all other frets buzzed when struck loud.. up to 14.


Moving on, I'm still confused about the free strings issue. First, I've never bought so much as a guitar pick from Guitar Center itself. The majority of my equipment purchases are made from their internet affiliate, "Musician's Friend". Was this a new guitar bought from this store, and a string job should have come with it?

they come w/ free ernie ball strings.


OK, hindsight is always 20/20, and backseat drivers are the best in the world, but IMHO, a Guitar Center in the middle of Times Square NYC, is possibly the worst place in the world to buy a guitar, save for perhaps some back street cart vendor in Shanghai, China.They likely deal with scads of tourists, and treat each customer as though they'll never see therm again...

never going back there ever again.


So yes, I have more questions: did you buy the guitar new or used? Did you buy it at that particular GC? How long have you had it? And just as a matter of idle curiosity, what the hell kind/brand of guitar is it?

i bought this less than 2 years ago in october from guitar center brand new. i bought it at the Union Sq. guitar center. It is a Fender FA-100.

Cheers
#11
Well sadly, I've now come to the ugly realization of how the poor guitar tech who had to deal with your and your "free strings", must have felt.

No mas. Go read the guide I linked. If you manage to get through it, you'll be able to determine what's wrong with your guitar.

In all honesty, I don't think I could summon the hubris, or have the ballz to march into a store with an "almost 2 year old guitar", and ask them to string it for me for nothing.
#13
Tony Done Tony, I've just decided what I want to be when, (or if), I ever grow up, dogmatically rude, stupid, and completely self absorbed. A sociopath's sociopath. if you will. Mind you, I'm almost there, but I still have a few minor inhibitions I have to overcome. OK, here goes:

So listen, would you mind stringing one of my guitars for me? All I ask is that you pay the round trip freight, and throw in a set of Elixirs. (Light gauge PB, if you don't mind).
#14
Quote by ikemac13
Captaincranky it Cost $20!
So what?

A pack of cigarettes in NYC goes for more than 10 dollars. (possibly going as high as $13.00 soon). Rental fees in Times Square are at rock bottom. $100.00 per square foot. That GC needs you like a hole in the head.

Do a YouTube search. You'll find tons of videos about how to string a guitar. Given you've had the guitar nigh on 2 years, don't you think it's about time you learned?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 4, 2017,
#15
Captaincranky I did and I broke a string that I bought from GC so I decided they can just do it for $20 bc he told me it would include a free pair of strings so I thought it was worth it. The guy said it comes with free strings! He was a dick to me in the first place! Whatever. I drank a lot of coffe every that day maybe I was a little hyped out.. I just didn't appreciate being lied to.
#16
Might be uneven frets, ikemac13 , judging by your explaination. But if they all buzz when whacked HARD*, then it should be normal, if you play with normal attack in strum and fingerstyle and they don't buzz then it should be no problem.

* (define hard, how hard did you hit the string? With a hard pick, with your thumb? Because if you pick upwards hard with a pick, or strum down hard with your thumb it'll buzz. It's normal because a string isn't meant to be hit that hard anyway lol)

And jesus, I feel sorry for the guitar tech dude too lol, go easy on them.
There's no such thing as free in this world, maybe his wording "free strings" was improper in some way..?
#17
Quote by ikemac13
Captaincranky I did and I broke a string that I bought from GC so I decided they can just do it for $20 bc he told me it would include a free pair of strings so I thought it was worth it. The guy said it comes with free strings! He was a dick to me in the first place! Whatever. I drank a lot of coffe every that day maybe I was a little hyped out.. I just didn't appreciate being lied to.
Strings break,welcome to the real world. Most of the time it's the owners fault..

Nobody likes to be lied to. I have found the best way to avoid most of it, is with the mute button on the TV remote control. Just push it "on", every time there's a commercial break.

Just so's you know, you're not getting any further sympathy of technical assistance from me. Nor will you be getting the last word. I've been on the web for quite while, and I'm a bigger "dick" than your fabled guitar tech, I guarantee it.

Now please go read the guide I linked. (3rd request) All the clever posts in the world on an internet forum won't fix your guitar, or anyone else's for that matter. At the end of the day, you will.

FWIW, most string breakage is the guitar owner's fault, mostly from tuning too high, or possibly nicking it with the wire cutters.. A second reason, is a sharp edge on a tuner., on the peg, where the string enters the hole.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 4, 2017,
#18
Quote by AORNova
Might be uneven frets, ikemac13 , judging by your explaination. But if they all buzz when whacked HARD*, then it should be normal, if you play with normal attack in strum and fingerstyle and they don't buzz then it should be no problem.
One still has to consider the issue of neck relief. With positive relief,. What would be the "too high frets" at 6 & 7, are directly above where the buzzing is happening. Even with a neutral or dead straight neck, the same thing might occur. (None of which is to say I think the all laminate Fender's fret job w\as leveled by a master luthier).
#20
Honestly you're asking a lot if you've owned a guitar for 2 years and dont know how to restring it. It takes like 10 minutes to learn. I you cant afford a $50 setup im not sure you can afford to pay $20 to have it restrung. Learn how to do it, buy a $5 pack and go to work.
#22
ikemac13 Say sorry. Very simple. Most of the dudes who work as a guitar tech or luthier love their job, it's not something you walk in and "do it while dreading".

They'll probably forgive you. People aren't so hard on about stuff like that, plus it's their hobby. A person who doesn't hate them is a +1 for them already.

And learn how to restring. Plenty of youtube tutorials for your preferred stringing style, it only takes at most 10 minutes to do, 20 if you're careless. And once you do it once, it's natural afterwards. Saves you money too!
#23
AORNova You know, I usually catch on to the fact I'm being led down a cow path, when the more of someone's questions I answer, the more questions that someone has.

Now I'm not saying that's what's going on in this thread, but it is a paradigm worth considering.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 5, 2017,
#24
AORNova I'm thinking he means that he would have to lift the fret up and fill the space under it with wood or glue or something.
Beginner guitarist looking to have some fun.
#25
Quote by zombiecheeseknives
AORNova I'm thinking he means that he would have to lift the fret up and fill the space under it with wood or glue or something.

NEVER! If a fret is too low (or too high), ALL the frets have to be leveled to the same height, a lengthy job that is best left to an experienced guitar tech, or preferably a luthier.

ikemac13 The truss rod is not intended to adjust the Action, it is there to adjust the Relief. If the Relief is correctly set and the Action is still too high/low, then the saddle needs to be adjusted and/or the nut. As for the buzzing problem, that could be due to any number of factors, including "pilot error". Hard to correct with a Forum 'question and answer' session.

Also, I agree with the other comments about restringing. After 2 years, you really should know how to restring your guitar.
#26
AORNova 
Quote by AORNova
yeejiat99
The guitar dude filled what?
edit: He was talking about the nut of the guitar, if I'm correct? The rectangular piece on the top neck of the guitar, white in color, where each string goes through a slot. If the nut was shaved at the bottom before (why lol) then it might just be too low now. A shim below the nut would fix it, but I'd rather change the nut to a new one imo.. (and I'm not sure what the guitar guy means by fill, how do you fill a nut to raise it..?)

Like Captcranky said, to determine the magnitude of the issue, play every string on every fret of the guitar. For example, play (pick string normally, not too hard or too soft) the Low E string on the first fret. If it buzzes, move down to the 2nd fret, keep moving down until it stops buzzing. Do this for all the strings. If it buzzes all the way down the neck you probably need a setup bad.
However..
if the strings are only buzzing on the first few frets, and you cannot afford a set-up, and loosening the trussrod doesn't help, try restringing the guitar to heavier gauge (thickness) of strings. If you have .12 Lights now, try .13 mediums.  "Thicker" strings would have more tension, give more pull to the neck and *might* just reduce the buzzing (less chance for the strings to shimmer and buzz on the frets). But they are harder to play, because they're thicker and have higher tension = harder to press. And you also run the risk of slowly warping the neck, lifting the bridge, ectra ectra.....

But heck, seriously. If it sounds bad, and has a botched nutjob, better to send it for a set-up. It'll help make the guitar play great again.

you raise the nut slot by filling with baking soda then add a drop of crazy glue let harden then file to correct height do not forget to tape fret board and headstock  as to not get glue on you guitar
Last edited by longhardgrind at Jul 9, 2017,
#27
Yes I know, baking soda and Ca glue harden to fill nut slots. But Op mentioned frets in earlier reply, and I was wondering lol. And he said raise it, so I doubt it's a slot fill..

Quote by longhardgrind
AORNova 

you raise the nut slot by filling with baking soda then add a drop of crazy glue let harden then file to correct height do not forget to tape fret board and headstock  as to not get glue on you guitar
#29
Learn how to restring your own guitar then hit up your psychiatrist to rant to him.  If you want real information, ask questions in a concise manner.
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"
#30
Quote by nemjeff13
Learn how to restring your own guitar then hit up your psychiatrist to rant to him.  If you want real information, ask questions in a concise manner.

nemjeff13, cut the guy some slack. He's obviously not a serious guitarist and also somewhat naive, but still, he had some questions to ask. Also, Guitar Center don't have a particularly good reputation for staff. They tend to be a mixed bag.
#31
Quote by frankowillo
nemjeff13, cut the guy some slack. He's obviously not a serious guitarist and also somewhat naive, but still, he had some questions to ask. Also, Guitar Center don't have a particularly good reputation for staff. They tend to be a mixed bag.
In all honesty, I didn't hear a rational question in any of the TS' posts.

From my point of view, if I wanted to be abused by GC's staff, I'd have taken a 2 year old guitar to their Times Square NYC store, and tried to force them to string it for nothing.

Oh wait, that's what he did.
#32
I'm still a little baffled about the whole free strings thing. Did it come with free strings when it was purchased, and he just thought that meant free strings forever?
#33
Quote by FrogstarWorldA
I'm still a little baffled about the whole free strings thing. Did it come with free strings when it was purchased, and he just thought that meant free strings forever?


At this stage, who knows? Maybe GC saw him as a rube and said, "Free strings, $20 fee to restring". They still make about $10 profit.
#34
Quote by FrogstarWorldA
I'm still a little baffled about the whole free strings thing. Did it come with free strings when it was purchased, and he just thought that meant free strings forever?
OK, from where I sit, our TS summarily decided to make a nuisance of himself at one of the most likely busiest of all Guitar Centers.

Apparently, free strings were offered with his guitar when bought NEW, almost 2 (two) years ago. Instead of going back to the GC where he bought it, he elected to go where he was unknown, and break ballz.

It's doubtful he had the receipt for the axe with him. Were I GC, I would require the original receipt to honor the free string offer, and then mark it so, after the offer was redeemed. This to prevent every joker and asshat from walking into the store and demanding free strings at will.

Our TS continued his rant here, posting venom and gibberish, along with a whole lot of BS.

He is no longer participating in the thread, and IMHO, the mods should lock this thread to prevent other members, (including myself) from wasting a buttload more time trying to figure it out.

The TS joined UG for the express purpose of venting this nonsense on us. It was his 1st official act to start the thread.

As far as I'm concerned, the value of any member, is measured by their willingness to answer questions, not in their ability to ask them.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 12, 2017,
#35
Captaincranky You, I like you. You remove all sense of passiveness from your argument and dick them down with logic. Good job, sir.
#36
I couldn't help thinking "what if he put that kind of effort into learning about his guitar and doing his own setup/maintenance?"