#1
Hi new guy here. I bought a Les Paul not too long ago and restrung the stings with standard Ernie Ball strings today. The factory set strings that were already on it (the ones I took out) had a beautiful chime to it but was harder to play. But the Ernie Balls were excellent for playing for me but sounded too "metallic" for me. Anybody got any recommendations for a set  of strings that might break even between these two? I generally play my guitar unplugged. (I'm weird I know)  I love the natural resonance of it & the new strings take a lot of the shine away from it. Thanks for reading.
#2
Well, there is more to it than brands. Different materials (nickel, chrome, steel, etc), gauges, and string type (round-wound, half-round, flat-wound, etc) affect the sound. Also strings change their tone once they break in, ie brand new strings sound different than week old strings and week old strings sound different than year old strings. What set of strings did you put on and do you know what it came with (some manufacturers will indicate this in the specs)? Also it could just be the "new string" sound that you don't like.
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#4
theogonia777 Thanks for replying. I just used the standard set: https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/static.ernieball.com/website/images/products/image_front/large/P02221.png

Yeah there starting to sound better & more broken in since I posted but I think I should experiment with others when I get the chance. Like I said the Ernie Ball's play so smooth & playing comfortably is the most important part (for me at least). But let me ask you, if I plug in an amp and jam, does different strings matter? A friend told me that the most important thing was the picks-ups & amps your using; but I personally believe different strings, different tone? 
#5
Quote by timothycason96
A friend told me that the most important thing was the picks-ups & amps your using; but I personally believe different strings, different tone? 


The amp is really going to be the meat 'n' taters of your tone, especially when playing high gain. The strings will have some effect on sound, which will be more pronounced when playing clean, but it will be subtle depending on the variables I mentioned and will not radically change your sound the way turning knobs on an amp would. But keep in mind that preferences in strings is more than just sound. Some players like thinner strings because they are easier to bend and metal players often need heavier strings to give adequate tension when downtuning, for example.
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