#1
My routine takes about an hour. Two 25min sections so I can take a 5 min break

first 25 min:
Chromatic scales exercises (do this to  warm up) about 10min
Major/minor scales shapes (all 7) about 15min

Second 25 min:
Pentatonic shapes (all 5) about 10min
spider   exercises, about 5min 
playing along with jam tracks, about 10min

for all the exercises I pick a tempo and go from quarter, 8th, triplet. and 16th. 

for example, right know I do all at 88 bpm and I'll move up once i can get everything clean and easy.

would like some feedback on how i might be able to manage an hour better. 

I've been doing something like this for a long time and it does help, but I think I might need to expand a little more. But if I change what im practicing I feel like Im neglecting what i used to practice. 

My goal right know is kind of broad. I just want to be a better guitar player overall. Better feel, better improv skills, faster playing, etc

 
#2
Where is learning songs?
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#3
Practice should be interesting, fun, engaging and learning something every day. Do you actually enjoy all the scales and shapes? How about spending more time playing along with jam tracks or songs. Most of my practice is learning songs, and picking up rhythm, soloing and scale techniques from that.
#4
Considering your account is from 2010 and you're apparently a tab contributor I guess you're not a beginner. I'll write this post on that assumption.

Your practice routine, as others have pointed out, is extremely technical and mechanical. There isn't enough direct learning and creating going on. You should definitely learn more songs, always expand your repertoire, this is honestly the best way to get better as an overall musician. If you want to build speed, learn real guitar solos you like, make your own etudes and if you get stuck, you should practice parts you can't handle with a metronome.

This routine is also completely lacking in aural skills like ear training which is super important, so I recommend some ear training exercises like learning songs by ear. Also, when you play along to a jam track, do you just noodle around or are you actually practicing improvisation? There's a difference.

All these scales are useful for a beginner who is struggling with fretting and picking and wants to build some basic muscle memory and speed, but the farther you get as a guitarist the more you should focus on learning and creating real music. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't practice speed and accuracy with a metronome ever, but when you do, try to make it meaningful and rewarding like practicing a solo by some guitarist you appreciate.
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#5
Designate some time for rhythm guitar techniques too (strumming patterns, palm muting, broken chords, chord changes).
Also, allow time for practicing creativity (improvisation is good practice for applying your skills is a real-life music situation, but put a recorder on and capture ideas (lead and rhythm) that you can develop for original songs later).
It can also help to learn new songs on a regular basis to expand your repertoire and apply your skills/techniques.
#6
How many times a week do you do this?

I know don't what your skill level is currently at, but that routine sounds like a decent way to get comfortable with playing scales. Having said that, if you feel the routine starts to get stale then move forward and start improvising over a different backing track every week.
#7
Quote by brenton393
My routine takes about an hour. Two 25min sections so I can take a 5 min break

first 25 min:
Chromatic scales exercises (do this to  warm up) about 10min
Major/minor scales shapes (all 7) about 15min

Second 25 min:
Pentatonic shapes (all 5) about 10min
spider   exercises, about 5min 
playing along with jam tracks, about 10min

for all the exercises I pick a tempo and go from quarter, 8th, triplet. and 16th. 

for example, right know I do all at 88 bpm and I'll move up once i can get everything clean and easy.

would like some feedback on how i might be able to manage an hour better. 

I've been doing something like this for a long time and it does help, but I think I might need to expand a little more. But if I change what im practicing I feel like Im neglecting what i used to practice. 

My goal right know is kind of broad. I just want to be a better guitar player overall. Better feel, better improv skills, faster playing, etc

 

If you're good at the above already, then move on.  This stuff is like riding a bike.  This could easily be collapsed to 10 minutes (after warm up), just to keep it fresh, and even then maybe once or twice a week.  And even then, you could introduce new approaches, such as playing the scales horizontally (along one or two strings, in either direction, with imaginative phrasing).

Pure scalar practice (up and down) can lead to a very unimaginative approach to soloing (I know, I went through that phase!!).

Just remember, technique is a means to an end.  It isn't the end.  Being musical is the utlimate goal,. which I suspect none of us ever truly believe we've reached .... there's always more to learn and explore.

Some obvious omissions are:

interval shapes
learning new chords (types, voicings, how to use these in different contexts)
rhythmic practice (e.g. breaking 3 bars of 4/4 into 4 groups of 3.  Time displacement. Odd time signatures ...)
phrasing
aural skills and transcription / amalysis of music you like
increasing a vocabulary of licks etc
chord tone connection
playing different keys in same area of neck (scales, chords)
playing patterns out of scale shapes
approach note patterns (to dress up a target note)

And I wouldn't cram a load of topics into one practice session either.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 16, 2017,
#8
Are you playing with others? This isn't part of a daily practice routine but having a band to play with is the most important practice and give you material to work on in your daily practice routine.

As far as your daily routine, I suggest this:  practice taking an idea (could be a lick you know, or something you make up on the spot) then try to move this idea around. For example, take a like that goes 1  3  5  7.  Now see where else in major scale you can play the same idea, or where in a Dorian scale can you play the same idea. Try to raise one of the notes, how does it sound (ex. 1   3   #5   7)? 

Also learning songs / solos by your favorite players (guitar or not) is always a great way to spend time. Even if you don't learn a whole solo, spend time to learn just a lick that you love, but take the time to learn it by ear, then take the time to try playing the lick over another tune you already know. Try experimenting with the lick, can you change the lick a bit with it still having the same feeling? Try starting it on a different note, try adding passing notes in it, just play around with it