#1
Went to a guitar shop to day to try out Gibson USA Les Paul Classic hp and studio HP 2017 models,  but they didn't have any in, I did try other models and an older version of the classic which I  did liked, just wondering  out of the HP which one is best?
Also I didn't like the attitude  of the guy in the shop , When he ask what amp I have I said I use a line 6 500x and powered speakers, he laughed and said why do I want to spend that much on a guitar without a proper amp,   I didn't know what to say really  , I have had tube amps and never really could get the best out of them in my  small flat so I settle for  a digital setup  ,    So I guess I left the shop  feeling I should get a cheaper guitar because I use digital ,
#2
I think the guy laughed because your setup isnt really how guitarists do it. I think those pedal boards are great for when you're playing through a pa system but you really need an amp to get the "guts" of a guitar. Have you tried a solid state amp? you might prefer that better. I believe the lp classic is the top of the line lp and the studio is under it.
#3
The guy in the shop is clueless. Ignore.

I have no idea which HP version is the "best". Honestly, if I were buying an HP I'd probably go for the Standard for the better top and the "ultra modern" chambering.

What I like about the HP:

  1. The contoured neck heel. I have five LP-alikes with contoured necks (one is actually an Axcess), and these really make working in the upper fret area a lot more comfortable. Three thumbs up. Should be on every LP.



What I don't care for about the HP:
  1. The neck width is 1 3/4, which is fine, but the string separation is standard. I have a guitar with a 1 3/4" nut width, but the string spacing at the nut is wider (a good thing).
  2. I'd remove the G-Force. They're prone to breakage, they become inaccurate as time goes on and they have problems tuning when the environment is noisy.
  3. I'm really not a fan of push-pulls if I can avoid them. You can't see at a glance where you're set, and I've actually done a "pull" and had the knob fly off into a crowd. Oops.
  4. I've already seen the aluminum cases for these looking like crap from dents and dings and scratches. If you want the case to look pretty this time next year, wrap it in bubble wrap and store it under the bed, and get a cheap case to carry the guitar around in.



Personal "Meh" items:
  1. I much prefer ebony fretboards and a flatter radius.
  2. I wish I could get it with jumbo frets and stainless steel frets.
  3. Don't care for the chrome pickup ring facings. BTW, notice that in the edge-on shot of the LP Standard HP, they don't even take the time to make the pickup rings fit the guitar. The inner corners on both pickup rings have an airgap where they don't meet the top of the guitar. Ack!
  4. I really don't want knurling on the pickup selector switch tip.
  5. I'm really not a fan of nitrocellulose lacquer finishes any more. It's the "High Performance" model. It's time for them to put a high performance finish on it.
  6. Where's the "poker chip" on the pickup selector? I like 'em. I have one that says "Bitch/Moan."


All in all, these are (IMHO) several steps in the right direction for Gibson.
If you're looking for differences between HPs, look at the pickups, the weight relief changes and the looks of the guitar.
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 3, 2017,
#4
Quote by N8dagreat3
I think the guy laughed because your setup isnt really how guitarists do it. I think those pedal boards are great for when you're playing through a pa system but you really need an amp to get the "guts" of a guitar. Have you tried a solid state amp? you might prefer that better. I believe the lp classic is the top of the line lp and the studio is under it.


I think the guy laughed because he's pretty much stuck in 1960. "Guitarists" DO do it with your setup these days. A LOT of them do. And no, you don't need an amp to get the "guts" of a guitar. That thinking is stuck in the '60's as well.

And no, the classic is not the top of the line HP.
#6
Quote by dazzzer30
Went to a guitar shop to day to try out Gibson USA Les Paul Classic hp and studio HP 2017 models,  but they didn't have any in, I did try other models and an older version of the classic which I  did liked, just wondering  out of the HP which one is best?

Also I didn't like the attitude  of the guy in the shop , When he ask what amp I have I said I use a line 6 500x and powered speakers, he laughed and said why do I want to spend that much on a guitar without a proper amp
,   I didn't know what to say really  , I have had tube amps and never really could get the best out of them in my  small flat so I settle for  a digital setup  ,    So I guess I left the shop  feeling I should get a cheaper guitar because I use digital ,

Fuck that noise. Get your gear elsewhere or from another salesperson.
#7
Quote by dspellman
I think the guy laughed because he's pretty much stuck in 1960. "Guitarists" DO do it with your setup these days. A LOT of them do. And no, you don't need an amp to get the "guts" of a guitar. That thinking is stuck in the '60's as well.

And no, the classic is not the top of the line HP.

Your right, i was wrong I forgot about the standard. Gibson has to many variations and when you throw epiphone in the mix it gets confusing.

a lot of guitarists do do it with a 1 unit pedal board. Not that they're bad, they are great when using a pa and you dont want to bring an amp.
#8
Quote by jedigovnaUG
What style of music will you be playing? Just curious?

I mostly play Rock , hard rock , some metal ,  
#9
Quote by N8dagreat3
Your right, i was wrong I forgot about the standard. Gibson has to many variations and when you throw epiphone in the mix it gets confusing.
a lot of guitarists do do it with a 1 unit pedal board. Not that they're bad, they are great when using a pa and you dont want to bring an amp.


Depending on the powered speakers that dazzzer30 has, he could have the equivalent of a PA (in terms of frequency response).
There are a LOT of options that would fill the bill. I've got a set of KRK Rokit 8's that are perfect for a small/medium-size practice room. I've also got three of the older Atomic Reactors, which look like guitar cabinets and have built-in tube amps (18W, 50W). And then i've got 1500W power amps pushing full-range three-way cabinets that can handle 900W each. At one point I used a Carvin stereo tube power amp (50W/50W) into a pretty wide-range 2x12 (plus tweeters).

Nothing at all wrong with traditional tube amps, of course, but I think we've progressed beyond the stage where someone will suggest you buy a cheaper guitar because your rig sucks .
#10
Quote by dspellman
Depending on the powered speakers that dazzzer30 has, he could have the equivalent of a PA (in terms of frequency response).
There are a LOT of options that would fill the bill. I've got a set of KRK Rokit 8's that are perfect for a small/medium-size practice room. I've also got three of the older Atomic Reactors, which look like guitar cabinets and have built-in tube amps (18W, 50W). And then i've got 1500W power amps pushing full-range three-way cabinets that can handle 900W each. At one point I used a Carvin stereo tube power amp (50W/50W) into a pretty wide-range 2x12 (plus tweeters).

Nothing at all wrong with traditional tube amps, of course, but I think we've progressed beyond the stage where someone will suggest you buy a cheaper guitar because your rig sucks .

I personally dont know a salesman that wouldnt jump at the chance to sell anyone a new lp with how much they cost.
#11
First, there are terribly arrogant salespeople at nearly any music store - that's a given, so don't let it dissuade you from buying a guitar you want.

Second,  for low volume practice you can't really beat modelling - that's where it excels. There's still a big difference between guitars when using sims. 


 
#12
First, find a different store. Fuck that guy, seriously.
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