Poll: Tite
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View poll results: Tite
Room reflections (small room)
1 50%
Power amp saturation
0 0%
Ear damage
0 0%
Other
1 50%
Voters: 2.
#1
What's causing this? I assume that it's just from cranking an amp in a small room with nothing to absorb the sound, but I may be wrong.

I'm hoping that it isn't hearing damage, although I don't think it's that because it still is there with ear protection (although less, but it blocks highs more than anything else anyways, so it probably isn't ear damage, but I'll keep it there anyways). If that's the case, I'll just wear hearing protection (it's not loud enough that it's required, unlike a drum set, it's a 15 watt, but it's also a Vox...), but that kills tone so I prefer not to.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#2
what you hear is harmonic overtones. part of the deal when playing electric (they exist on acoustics as well but are much harder to hear). when you pluck a string you have the primary note but you also get some overtones as well. volume and distortion tend to bring them out 
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
what you hear is harmonic overtones. part of the deal when playing electric (they exist on acoustics as well but are much harder to hear). when you pluck a string you have the primary note but you also get some overtones as well. volume and distortion tend to bring them out 


I know that, I was just wondering what was causing me to hear the harmonics so clearly. I guess I wasn't very clear.

So volume can bring that out, huh. That's probably it. Thanks.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#5
Quote by Tony Done
monwobobbo

Does the amp itself generate overtones? IOW, if you fed a simple sine wave into an overdriven amp, would the output have harmonics?

no idea. vibration of the string produces the note heard as well as the overtonesin the background. not an expert on this at all just the explaination i was given years ago. 
#6
monwobobbo 

What sparked my interest in this is the discussion you see on how different kinds of clipping favour different harmonics, as in asymmetric versus symmetric clipping in stomp boxes. I'm not sure if the harmonics all come from the vibrating string or whether the clipping device also generates them. A little research might be in order.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
monwobobbo 

Does the amp itself generate overtones? IOW, if you fed a simple sine wave into an overdriven amp, would the output have harmonics?


Yes. Much less so, though. A square wave would eventually happen, and that's just all harmonics (all odd order ones).
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#8
Quote by Tony Done
monwobobbo

What sparked my interest in this is the discussion you see on how different kinds of clipping favour different harmonics, as in asymmetric versus symmetric clipping in stomp boxes. I'm not sure if the harmonics all come from the vibrating string or whether the clipping device also generates them. A little research might be in order.

yeah guess the amp woud play a part in terms of clipping. i know tubes favor even order harmonics which are considered good and solid state tend twoard odd order which can sound rough and unpleasant. both are present though. like i said i know a little about this but am far from an expert. 
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
what you hear is harmonic overtones. part of the deal when playing electric (they exist on acoustics as well but are much harder to hear). when you pluck a string you have the primary note but you also get some overtones as well. volume and distortion tend to bring them out 


Guitar notes exist as fundamentals (usually) plus harmonics. In fact, when the speakers can't actually reproduce the fundamentals (most guitar amps have trouble reproducing 82Hz, which is the low open E string), but the mathematical relationship between the harmonics *indicates* to your ear that you're playing that note. The amount of each harmonic is what you call "tone."

There's also feedback. When you've got the amp volume cranked up, it's moving air. That air movement can actually move the guitar string, which produces a magnetic reaction in the pickup which forms a feedback loop. Some rooms reflect some wavelengths better than others (a wavelength is, after all, a physical distance between peaks of a sound wave), so you'll find some notes feeding back better/more than others.
#10
Update for anyone still subscribed: I cranked it today in my unfinished basement, which is huge, and there was much less of that harmonic ghost notes. I thik the small room was amplifying the effect.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3