#1
Recently before a gig I came in to set up my amp and pedalboard ,and to my suprise my board wouldn't work. Luckily I got through the gig by borrowing a battery and using my wah. To my avail I haven't been able to fix it. All the cables are plugged in well and snug. I think backstage workers hit my board and f'd up my board. Now I'm looking for your suggestions. I would like help on to how to fix it and if worse comes to worse what power supply to buy that's good and won't absolutely cripple the bank (all of my spare cash is going torwards new amp).
#2
Tell us more about what you actually have. Hard to diagnose "I have a thing and it's not working" if we don't know what the thing is! 

Some power supplies have a fuse or a fault interrupt that needs to be replaced/reset if the unit shorts out. I'd start with the manual for whatever it is you're using for a power supply. 
#3
Divide and conquer:

1- Determine if it's a power supply issue by powering yourpedals off batteries.
2- Determine if it's a pedal or cable issue by re-adding your pedals one at a time between your guitar and amp till the problem reappears.

Trying to Debug the issue by looking at the whole board at once is very difficult.
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#4
Roc8995 I am using a one spot power supply my pedals are in this order cry baby wah, ibanez sound tank phaser, ibanez mini tube screamer, applause chorus pedal (boss rip off), mxr carbon copy for any thing else try checking my profile
#5
As with diagnosing anything electronic, you need to employ a process of elimination by confirming what does still work to find out what doesn't. Try running just 1 pedal off the power supply. If it works, then check that all the other pedals work by testing them the same way.

If none of the pedals do anything at all when using the power supply, try running a battery off them to rule out the possibility of the pedals themselves causing the problem. You can run a battery off pedals that don't have a battery holder by soldering a standard 9v battery clip to a negative center pin pedal power supply connector; the standard ones used for powering pedals off a power supply. The pedals will all work perfectly fine by powering them this way and it's a convenient way to test them. You can either buy an adaptor or you can make your own.




The only thing to watch out for is to make sure that the center pin is connected to the negative terminal of the battery clip. Otherwise you'll end up powering the pedal with the wrong polarity, which can damage them.
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#6
Toodeepblue's suggestion is what I suggest. Disconnect everything. Try using just one pedal and the One Spot to power it. If that works add another pedal to the chain and keep going till you find your problem. Like the One Spot, they are inexpensive and work with no hum but like anything electronic it can go bad or get damaged.
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#7
If none of the pedals function then it's almost certainly the power supply.  Do you have a multimeter?  That way you can easily see if the power supply is working.

Is the power supply adjustable voltage?  One of mine is and it's forever getting accidentally switched to the wrong voltage. It's surprising how badly pedals function on 4.5V
#8
Quote by 8Len8
Divide and conquer:

1- Determine if it's a power supply issue by powering yourpedals off batteries.
2- Determine if it's a pedal or cable issue by re-adding your pedals one at a time between your guitar and amp till the problem reappears.

Trying to Debug the issue by looking at the whole board at once is very difficult.


Yup -- Trouble Shooting 101.
Pedal boards have a lot of single points of failure that can take out the entire thing. A single failed connector cable, a single dead pedal, a dead power supply. Don't buy what you don't need -- make sure that you've identified the issue before you go shopping.