#1
ive read in other forums that having ur hand floating when picking is the best position (not even anchoring with pinky ) but other people have said that u should mute unwanted string with ur palm so which is it ?

btw i cant mute with my fretting hand thumb ,hand is too small
#3
Quote by jerrykramskoy
You playing electric guitar?  If so, floating above the strings is not an option (string noise).


so you're suggesting that the absolute only way to play an electric guitar is anchoring?  

I can't wait to get home and see what kind of instrument I've been playing all these years.
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#5
aipicos if you are playing loud, with distortion, to sound good you need to learn to mute all the strings you are not picking. This can be done with both hands. You should be able find some videos on it on Youtube, I'm sure Marty did some.

Playing quietly and picking e.g, on an accoustic is not so much of a problem, but using an achoring little finger or not is totally optional - whichever suits you best.
#6
If there are rules on this, I'm totally breaking them...because I do both on a case by case basis.
Flying in a blue dream
#7
Badluckpalms :-)

No. I didn't say anything about anchoring with pinky etc.

For soloing I rest my palm on the bridge/strings, and form a tunnel (bringing in a curled little finger) to form a tunnel where only one string can sound out, and everything else is muted.  That said, I have recently found that anchoring a couple or fingers on the body makes picking more reliable ... but that doesn't work well for me (muting-wise).  I've always been a legato-style player (I prefer the sound), and picking was a long-way down on my list ... so I could accurately pick 1/16ths at around 160 (economy picking), whereas legato I can crank a lot higher (but I avoid that mostly).  But I am slowly working on my picking technique.  I did get reasonably good at the Thumb muting technique, but I found it too constraining ... damped-style sounds were unattainable,  And then I wrecked my hands.
#8
aipicos Even with low/no distortion, string noise is an issue, at loud volume.

Think how levers work ... a tiny motion at one end can translate into a large motion at the other end.

So I think the biggest drawback with floating your hand above the strings is that any mistakes with forearm/wrist positioning will be amplified in the motion your fingers make, compared to when your picking hand is resting on the strings and/or anchoring.  At low speeds, this probably won't show up.  At high speeds, precise-motions are what's needed to sound good.  But everyone differs in their control over their hands etc.

I would advise getting into resting your palm on the strings/bridge.  This will give you sonic options that you cannot achieve when floating.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 7, 2017,
#9
Quote by jerrykramskoy
  Badluckpalms :-)

  No. I didn't say anything about anchoring with pinky etc.

Quote by jerrykramskoy

So I think the biggest drawback with floating your hand above the strings is that any mistakes with forearm/wrist positioning will be amplified in the motion your fingers make, compared to when your picking hand is resting on the strings and/or anchoring.  

That's all fine. but to be fair, you said floating is not an option.  That is a false statement.  

A lot of players develop nuances in their playing to correct the issues you describe.  Some mute with picking hand, some mute with fretting hand, and some become so damn awesome and precise they don't worry about it.

Everyone plays different.  It's arguable that many guitar players do not play the way you describe.  It's about comfort and what rings with the player.  I'll also add, you're approaching this from the pov of honing in a highly technical picking style for soloing.  This person is a new player and likely hasn't even developed a comfortable strumming technique yet (my interpretation).  

I'm not trying to be unfair, and I think everything you're saying has merit, but I also think it's the difference in approach that is confusing this person on those other forums. You've got highly technical guys giving advise based on this kind of stuff...
Quote by jerrykramskoy
so I could accurately pick 1/16ths at around 160 (economy picking), whereas legato I can crank a lot higher 

and the op is probably palm muting his guitar wondering why he still can't play.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#10
Badluckpalms Fair comment!

 I was thinking about learning guitar that will cover both rhythm and lead, and so frar I am unaware of any electric lead guitarists that always play floating their hand above the body ... howeverI have seen rhythm players doing this.

Can you recommend any lead players worth watching doing this?  I'd be interested.

That's what I love about music and guitar in particular ... there's always new stuff to learn / find out about.