#1
I had trouble with finding names for this chords: 

c,e,g#,b,d,f,a - ? 
d,f,a,c,e,g#,b - ? 
e,g#,b,d,f,a,c - ? 
f,a,c,e,g#,b,d - ? 
g#,b,d,f,a,c,e - ? 
a,c,e,g#,b,d,f - ? 
b,d,f,a,c,e,g# - ? 

_________ 

c,e,g#,b,d,f#,a - ? 
d,f#,a,c,e,g#,b - ? 
e,g#,b,d,f#,a,c - ? 
f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d - ? 
g#,b,d,f#,a,c,e - ? 
a,c,e,g#,b,d,f# - ? 
b,d,f#,a,c,e,g# - ? 

and I found an answer but I do not understand it 

First line - 

Cmaj13+5 
Dm13+11 
Emaj7+5add11-9 
Fmaj7+11+9 
Fmaj7+11+9/Ab 
Am maj11+5 
Bm 13-9 

Second line- 

Cmaj13-5 
D13 add9+11 
E11+5 
Am Maj11/f# 
E11+5/G# 
Am Maj13 
Bm7 add11add13-9 

What is wrong with g# and f# chords? 
And why chord [c,e,g#,b,d,f#,a] is Cmaj13-5? 
I think chord [c,e,g#,b,d,f#,a] is Cmaj13/+11/+5 not Cmaj13-5 

5 is g# not gb,11(or 4) is also sharp ... 

Fully extend chords are the same thing as modes
The point is not to play them on guitar
but find tonal chord name, for each scale spread in thirds.

We can play arpeggio of course
but I need only names for all 21 scales

natural - c,d,e,f,g,a,b
harmonic - c,d,e,f,g#,a,b
melodic - c,d,e,f#,g#,a,b

I mean
c,d,e,f,g,a,b is ionian scale,I know
but 
c,e,g,b,d,f,a is "ionian chord" Cmaj9/11/13

and I need same for other scales.
#2
First chord can't be a Major13 because it has a sharp 5th in it so it's not a major chord but rather an augmented chord. If you meant to say that with the +5, the correct notation is the sharp sign, though the hash # is normally used in text since it is a close approximation. Same thing with the -9 in another example. It should be a flat sign or b as a close approximation. I'm not going to look at all the chords for mistakes for an important reason.

The problem with naming bigger extensions (or even tetrads) is that, on its own, the pitches do not indicate function. For example, the pitches AGCE. Is it an Am7 or a C6? Even though they are enharmonic equivalents, they are very different chords depending on how they function. Simply put, put in place of an Am, it will sound different than if put in place of a C. The bigger the chord, the more functions it could possibly serve so without context, it is hard to correctly name the chord.
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#4
The root is not always certain though. If I voiced ACEG (not an Am7 but just that group of notes) as EACG, which is the root note? You would have to look for other things, such as the chord progression and other instruments such as the bass. If the bass is alternating or walking a you have A on the 1st beat and E on the 3rd, I would say it's an Am7.

Sometimes you get a more "obvious" voice. If it were voiced EGAC, since the C is the highest voice, I would say it is mostly functioning as a C6, but many voicings are not so obvious, particularly on an instrument like guitar where you can't always voice chords tightly the way you can on a piano or steel guitar for example.
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#6
Quote by opiekundps2015
 EACG, which is the root note?  

A


But you don't know that for sure without hearing it in context. If played over a walking bass playing playing F-A-C-E-G-E-C-A? At that point it is functioning as an Fmaj9 with the root note omitted, though that of course is probably not going to happen. But it could. In jazz for example it is common to drop the root and maybe the 5th of an 11th or 13th chord to create a 4 note voicing. In context with the bass, the function is much more apparent.

The point is that you simply can't always tell. For example, on banjo (tuned gDGBd) the chord x0210 would be DACD. Typically this chord functions as a D7 but without a third, it is, much like a power chord, neither inherently major or minor. However, this voicing almost always functions as a D7. But on its own, and without knowing that most bluegrass songs tend to be in G (unless capoed), it is ambiguous.

And that's what is tricky about getting those 5, 6, and 7 note chords. Without context, you can't make heads or tales of it. You can easily say "giving me a voicing for G13" and get a goicing, but you can't get a half dozen notes and know for sure what their function is.
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Last edited by theogonia777 at Jul 6, 2017,
#7
Ok but we talk just about scales

c,d,e,f,g,a,b - ionian scale
c,e,g,b,d,f,a  - "ionian chord" Cmaj9/11/13 

d,e,f,g,a,b,c - dorian scale
d,f,a,c,e,g,b - "dorian chord"  Dm13

e,f,g,a,b,c,d - phrygian scale
e,g,b,d,f,a,c - "phrygian chord" Em713-/9

etc etc
#8
Scales and chords do not share a one-to-one relationship.
If that's what you are looking for, you aren't going to find it.
Quote by reverb66
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#10
opiekundps2015

But how do you determine if it's the tonic or whatever without context? How you name a chord depends on its function as much as the notes in it and how they are arranged.

The way these extended chords are named (once you know the root) also follows very simple rules. There are reasons you'd name a chord tone one thing vs another, and it's useful to understand the conventions as they are practiced. It's formulaic, but you can't apply the formula properly if you don't understand the context a chord appears in.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 6, 2017,
#11
  how do you determine if it's the tonic or whatever without context? 

In the simplest way
How do You know which note is the first note of c ionian scale?
C is first so c is root and chord name is also C,  Cmaj9/11/13.
 
  
#12
Quote by opiekundps2015
In the simplest way
How do You know which note is the first note of c ionian scale?
C is first so c is root and chord name is also C,  Cmaj9/11/13.
 
  
..that is if the chord is named...what if you see the following notation and nothing else no name of the chord just these notes C G B E..now I understand the first impression would be to call it a Cmag7...but it could be many different chords..and until it is in "context" like a progression or even a melodic string..the notes could be moving voices that are just "frozen" for what ever reason..
play well

wolf
#14
Quote by opiekundps2015
C G B E - Cmaj7


In most cases, yes, but it could also be an Emadd13 depending on context. Not likely, but possible. That's what we are trying to say here you can't be certain of a chord without context.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#15
Quote by opiekundps2015
In the simplest way
How do You know which note is the first note of c ionian scale?
C is first so c is root and chord name is also C,  Cmaj9/11/13.
 
  


This doesn't exactly make sense. The root of any chord or scale depends largely on what's happening around it. There are things to consider other than stacking thirds.

C6 and Am7 have the same notes - how would you determine which is correct without any musical context?

And if incomplete voicing are being used, you really need to know the context. What chord would be implied by the notes Eb F# C?

I think you need to take a look at some actual music and work out the harmonies. You're not really learning music theory unless you use these concepts to analyze real music. Get a Mozart score or something. You'll see pretty quickly how this stuff can become ambiguous.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 6, 2017,
#17
Quote by opiekundps2015
g#,b,d = G#m/5-
g#,b,d,f = G#m6/5-
g#,b,d,f,a,c,e = G# mission impossible ?? 

G#m6b5? That's not a chord. G#°7 is, though, and you'd spell it with an E# if you're being proper about it. Could also be an E7b9, with the 9th subbed in for the root.

And for the record, Eb F# C imply a D7b9 chord. Anyone who plays jazz recognizes that immediately because they understand the context in which those notes appear together, which narrows down the options quite a bit.

You're not at a loss for knowledge or reasoning ability here, you just need to apply the concept to actual music. What actual pieces of music are you analyzing?
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 6, 2017,
#19
Quote by opiekundps2015
Just scales.
Now I am become Deaf, the destroyer of chords.


Right, get some actual music and start analyzing. The formulas and basic rules aren't even a fraction of what there is to know about harmony, and you can only learn that stuff by doing your own analyses.

Lots of classical scores can be found online for free, and you'd be fine even just doing the first page of a score. Do something like a solo piano piece or string quartet. And get something from the early classical period where the harmonies are actually identifiable.
#20
You rarely see chords with 7 different notes in them. In most cases at least some of the notes will be omitted. My point is, at least in this form a lot of your chords are purely theoretical and don't necessarily have much use in actual music. Also, some extensions are rarely used, for example a natural 11th over a major 7th chord.

I know what you are trying to do - you are trying to find the name for all of the possible fully extended chords of the harmonic and melodic minor scales (with each note functioning as the root). Surely this is possible, but I'm not sure if it's practical. For example if we take the harmonic minor scale, the only chord that really gets taken from it is the V and the VII diminished chord (and even then, those chords are rarely fully extended). All of the other chords in minor keys usually come from the natural minor scale, though in jazz it's also common to use a minor 6th or the mmaj7 as the tonic chord (which would imply a "melodic minor sound").

Naming chords is pretty simple, though. You just need to know intervals and you need to know that the third of a chord is assumed to be major (and if it's not, there will be an "m" in the chord name), the 7th is assumed to be minor (if it's a major 7th, the chord name has a "maj7"), the 9th and 13th are assumed to be major and the 5th and 11th are assumed to be perfect (if they aren't, there will be a "b" or "#" in front of them). And if a chord has an added 6th, that's always a major 6th. Then there's the dim7 chord that is kind of its own thing (and the rules about the 3rd, 5th and 7th that I mentioned above don't really apply - dim7 already implies minor third, diminished 5h and diminished 7th). And when it comes to extended chords (9th, 11th, 13th), they always include a 7th unless it's an "add chord". With this knowledge you should be able to name any chord. But sometimes treating every note as a chord tone misses the point.

So,

"f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d = F# what" - F# = root, A = minor third - "m", C = diminished fifth - "b5", E = minor 7th - "7", G# = major 9th - "9", B = perfect 11th - "11", D = minor 13th - "b13". Now, because the 11th, the 9th and the 7th are not altered, we can simply write F#m11 and that will include perfect 11th, major 9th and minor 7th. The full name would be F#m11b13b5 - that's the name for the chord. Not sure if this chord is actually used in any song, but this is what it would be called.

"g#,b,d,f#,a,c,e = G# what" - G# = root, B = #9, D = b5, F# = 7, A = b9, C = major 3rd, E = #5/b13. We could call this chord something like G#7b9#9b5#5, but G#alt is the more common way. Alt means "altered" and it refers to the altered 9th and the altered 5th. A chord with both an altered 5th and an altered 9th is an "alt chord".

Then again, even if this isn't practical, it's a good interval exercise, and I would actually suggest figuring out the names for the rest of the chords. It's also a good test on whether or not you understand chord construction.
Quote by AlanHB
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Gear

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 6, 2017,
#22
Quote by opiekundps2015
g#,b,d = G#m/5-
Nope, G#dim. G#-D is a diminished 5th, which is where the chord gets its name.
Your symbol is logical, but not conventional. Most readers would squint at that for a few seconds before guessing what you meant, but not being sure.
Quote by opiekundps2015
g#,b,d,f = G#m6/5-
Nope, G#dim7. The G#dim triad has acquired a "diminished 7th" interval (G#-F), hence the chord name.
G#-F sounds like Ab-F which is a major 6th. So if you spelled the chord Ab-Cb-Ebb-F,you could legitimately call it "Abm6b5" (notice you need to respell the B and D as well.
OTOH, spell it G#-B-D-E#, and that would be G#m6b5. However, what you've really got there is an inverted E#dim7 (E#-G#-B-D), which is the vii chord in F# minor. (Same as Fdim7 is vii chord in Gb minor, but we never use Gb minor...)

Quote by opiekundps2015
g#,b,d,f,a,c,e = G# mission impossible ?? 
Yup! (But see below....)

Chord names are based on stacks of 3rds, where the lowest is considered the root. So for any unknown chord, try to re-arrange the notes so they stack in 3rds. sometimes you need to respell notes with flats instead of sharps or vice versa.

See above with those dim7 options. "B-D-F-G#" is not in 3rds, because F-G# is a 2nd (and B-G# is a 6th). Either re-spell the G# as Ab, making it Bdim7. Or put the G# on the bottom to get G#-B-D-F, which is all 3rds, therefore G#dim7.

Your g#,b,d,f,a,c,e chord is a stack of 3rds, but because you have the whole scale (A harmonic minor) the chord identity has become ambiguous, and therefore impossible to name sensibly (but see below).

Up to 7ths (1-3-5-7), chord identities are easy and usually obvious. 7th chords can be inverted, the notes put in any order, and it makes no difference to their identity. Bb-C-E-G is still C7 (3rd inversion), although you can call it C/Bb or C7/Bb if you like.

Add 9ths, and mostly they stay clear, although the kind of 9th may make a difference. And putting the 9th on the bottom will make it sound like a different chord.

11ths are more problematic. Depending on the rest of the chord, they can create confusing dissonances, sounding like two different chords simultaneously.

With 13ths - especially if you include 9 and 11 - that's even more the case. A 7-note chord - most of the time - is going to sound like at least two different chords fighting each other.

In your example, its G#dim7 with an Am triad on top. Or G#dim wih Fmaj7 on top, if you prefer. Either way, it's two different functions ar the same time, a harmonic mess.

However, if it's just a name you want, the mission is not impossible. Polychords come to the rescue! A polychord is one chord on top of another - exactly what we want for this stack. Polychord symbols are like slash chords, except the line between is horizontal, so one chord is literally on top of the other. That's hard to type, but something like this:

Am
G#dim7
Last edited by jonriley64 at Jul 7, 2017,
#23
Very very...interesting ,thanks  
I was afraid that most of these chords will have to be named like 
G Omega Doom sharp Absolute/diminish nothingness  
but I guess I'm starting  to embrace the issue  

...is going to sound like at least two different chords fighting each other. 

Yeees,it is cool Permanent Tension 13
#25
 Polychords come to the rescue! 


Don't you think that's  way for shortcuts?
Spreading seven notes on five triads is not a big challenge
but if we take this notes f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d...hm.

f# - root
a - terce
c - triton!!
e -  septime
g# - second / ninth
b - quart / eleventh
d - sext / thirteenth

...F#dim7/#9/b11/b13 ???
 
 F#m11b13b5 - that's the name for the chord.  


Hmm,my notation is also allowed?
Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Jul 8, 2017,
#26
Quote by opiekundps2015

but if we take this notes f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d...hm.

f# - root
a - terce
c - triton!!
e -  septime
g# - second / ninth
b - quart / eleventh
d - sext / thirteenth

...F#dim7/#9/b11/b13 ???
 


Hmm,my notation is also allowed?

No, because dim7 would imply a diminished 7th (F#-Eb). F#-E is a minor 7th which means it's a m7b5 chord. Also, I don't understand where you get the "b11" from. F#-B is a perfect 4th/11th, so it's just 11. A "b11" would be Bb. But "b11" chords don't exist because b11 is enharmonically the same as major third, so if a chord had a "b11", it would just be a major chord. Also, G# is not a #9 because F#-G# is a major 9th, not an augmented one.

Naming chords has everything to do with interval qualities and not with the fact whether a note has a sharp or a flat symbol in front of it. You need to know interval qualities if you want to understand chord symbols.

Also, in English, the interval names are simply second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and octave.


It's F#m11b13b5 because it has a minor third, diminished fifth (tritone), minor 7th, major 9th, perfect 11th (the 9th doesn't need to be mentioned because it's unaltered so it's already included in the "11" - and because it's an extended chord and not an "add" chord, the 7th is included by default, so again, you don't need to mention it) and minor 13th.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
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#27
It's too difficult for me to give names for  these chords.
If you have a moment and you know for 100% that names are correct
please make a list
#28
Quote by opiekundps2015
It's too difficult for me to give names for  these chords.
If you have a moment and you know for 100% that names are correct
please make a list


none of this is going to make sense without looking an actual piece of music
#29
Quote by opiekundps2015
It's too difficult for me to give names for  these chords.
If you have a moment and you know for 100% that names are correct
please make a list

No. Figure it out yourself. Otherwise you won't learn anything.

Here are the instructions:

Check the quality of the third:
Major third - no effect on the chord name
Minor third - "m"

Check the quality of the 5th:
Perfect fifth - no effect on the chord name
Diminished fifth - "b5"
Augmented 5th - "#5"

Check the quality of the 7th:
Minor 7th - "7"
Major 7th - "maj7"

Check the quality of the 9th:
Major 9th - "9"
Minor 9th - "b9"
Augmented 9th - "#9"

Check the quality of the 11th:
Perfect 11th - "11"
Augmented 11th - "#11"

Check the quality of the 13th:
Major 13th - "13"
Minor 13th - "b13"

Exceptions:
Diminished chords...
If the chord has a minor third, a diminished fifth and a diminished 7th, chord symbol = dim7 or o7

Extended chords...
An 9 chord includes the 7th by default. For example C9 = C7add9. Cmaj9 = Cmaj7add9. You only need to mention the 7th if the 9th is altered for clarity's sake. For example C7b9. Why not "Cb9"? Because people would think the root of that chord would be Cb.
An 11 chord includes the 7th and the 9th by default. For example C11 = C7add9add11. Cmaj11 = Cmaj7add9add11. Again, you only need to mention the 7th or the 9th if the 11th is altered. For example Cmaj9#11 or C7#11.
A 13 chord includes 7th, 9th and 11th by default. For example C13 = C7add9add11add13. Cmaj13 = Cmaj7add9add11add13. Again, same as above. You only need to mention the 7th, 9th or 11th if the 13th is altered. For example C7b13.

Add chords...
If the chord doesn't have a 7th, it's an "add chord". For example Cadd9 means a C major chord with an added 9th, no 7th. In add chords you use 6th instead of 13th. You can add more extensions to add chords too. For example C6 with an added 9th could be C6add9 or just C6/9. And you could also add an 11th to it, for example C6/9/#11. When it comes to add chords, the 6th is a major 6th.

Remember that a diminished 7th looks like a major 6th. But if the chord has a diminished triad, then the major 6th is actually a diminished 7th. There is no such thing as "m6b5" chord.


But naming chords without context doesn't make a lot of sense, because the same set of notes can have many different names depending on the context. It's a good interval exercise, but I would do what cdgraves suggested - learn some actual music.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#30
As the others are saying, it's the overall context (across instruments, and across a period of time) that determines how a bunch of notes are going to sound ... in particular which of these is the root (and there isn't always one root (e.g. diminished chords)).

Even a simple  example, shows the effect of context:

Guitar:
e:  
b:  E
g:  C
d:  G
a:
e:

by itself, this is a C chord (inverted).

Add a C in the bass, , e.g. on bass guitar, and alternate with an A (with shorter duration), the main effect of this is a C major chord,
But swap this, A in the bass then C with shorter duration, the main effect of this is an A minor chord.

For the vast majority of chords, where there is a mix of different intervals present, if there is one perfect 5th present somewhere, it's lower pitch is the root,
If there are several perfect 5ths, the pitch of the lowest of these is the root.  If you have a mix of perfect 4ths and other intervals (other than p.5ths), find the lowest 4th, and the upper pitch of this is the root.

If you have a stack of identical intervals (all maj 3rds or all min 3rds), there is no clear one root.

If you have a stack of two p4ths, the root is hard to pick out.  But with three or more stacked p4ths, the root sounds like the lowest pitch in the stack.

But again, context candynamically change the situation.

The above means that certain attempts to revoice a chord will change the chord root.  This may be good or bad.

For example, Am6 add 9 is first chord below, with the 9th on top.  Second chord places B in the bass.  It's no longer a 9th.

Guitar:
e:  B       
b:  E     E
g:  C     C
d:  F#    F#   <=======
a:  A     A
e:         B    <========   New root, makes p5th with the F#.  Big change in the sound.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 8, 2017,
#31
opiekundps2015 
Here is some fuel for your fire...

C Major (C E G)
C Minor (C Eb G)
C Augmented (C E G#)
C Diminished (C Eb Gb)
C Dominant 7th (C E G Bb)
C Major 7th (C E G B)
C Minor 7th (C Eb G Bb)
C Minor Maj 7th (C Eb G B)
C Aug 7 (C E G# Bb)
C Aug Maj 7 (C E G# B)
C Half Dim 7 (C Eb G Bb)
C Full Dim 7 (C Eb Gb Bbb)
C Dim Maj 7 (C Eb Gb B)
C 9 (C E G Bb D)
C b9 (C E G Bb Db)
C #9 (C E G Bb D#)
C Maj 9 (C E G B D)
C Maj b9 (C E G B Db)
C Maj #9 (C E G B D#)
C Min 9 (C Eb G Bb D)
C Min b9 (C Eb G Bb Db) 
C Min Maj 9 (C Eb G B D)
C Min Maj b9 (C Eb G B Db)
C Min Maj #9 (C Eb G B D#)
C Aug 9 (C E G# Bb D)
C Aug b9 (C E G# Bb Db)
C Aug #9 (C E G# Bb D#)
C Aug Maj 9 (C E G# B D)
C Aug Maj b9 (C E G# B Db)
C Aug Maj #9 (C E G# B D#)
C Half Dim 9 (C Eb Gb Bb D)
C Half Dim b9 (C Eb Gb Bb Db)
C Dim 9 (C Eb Gb Bbb D)
C Dim b9 (C Eb Gb Bbb Db)
C Dim Maj 9 (C Eb Gb B D)
C Dim Maj b9 (C Eb Gb B Db)
C 11 (C E G Bb D F)
C b9 11 (C E G Bb Db F)
C #9 11 (C E G Bb D# F)
C #11 (C E G Bb D F#)
C b9 #11 (C E G Bb Db F#)
C #9 #11 (C E G Bb D# F#)
C Maj 11 (C E G B D F)
C Maj b9 11 (C E G B Db F)
C Maj #9 11 (C E G B D# F)
C Maj #11 (C E G B D F#)
C Maj b9 #11 (C E G B Db F#)
C Maj #9 #11 (C E G B D# F#)
C Min 11 (C Eb G Bb D F)
C Min b9 11 (C Eb G Bb Db F)
C Min #9 11 (C Eb G Bb D# F)
C Min #11 (C Eb G Bb D F#)
C Min b9 #11 (C Eb G Bb Db F#)
C Min #9 #11 (C Eb G Bb D# F#)
C Min Maj 11 (C Eb G B D F)
C Min Maj b9 11 (C Eb G B Db F)
C Min Maj #9 11 (C Eb G B D# F)
C Min Maj #11 (C Eb G B D F#)
C Min Maj b9 #11 (C Eb G B Db F#)
C Min Maj #9 #11 (C Eb G B D# F#)
C Aug 11 (C E G# Bb D F)
C Aug b9 11 (C E G# Bb Db F)
C Aug #9 11 (C E G# Bb D# F)
C Aug #11 (C E G# Bb D F#)
C Aug b9 #11 (C E G# Bb Db F#)
C Aug #9 #11 (C E G# Bb D# F#)
C Aug Maj 11 (C E G# B D F)
C Aug Maj b9 11 (C E G# B Db F)
C Aug Maj #9 11 (C E G# B D# F)
C Aug Maj #11 (C E G# B D F#)
C Aug Maj b9 #11 (C E G# B Db F#)
C Aug Maj #9 #11 (C E G# B D# F#)
C Half Dim 11 (C Eb Gb Bb D F)
C Half Dim b9 11 (C Eb Gb Bb Db F)
C Dim 11 (C Eb Gb Bbb D F)
C Dim b9 11 (C Eb Gb Bbb Db F)
C Dim Maj 11 (C Eb Gb B D F)
C Dim Maj b9 11 (C Eb Gb B D F#)
C 13 (C E G Bb D F A)
C b9 11 13 (C E G Bb Db F A)
C #9 11 13 (C E G Bb D# F A)
C #11 13 (C E G Bb D F# A)
C b9 #11 13 (C E G Bb Db F# A)
C #9 #11 13 (C E G Bb D# F# A)
C Maj13 (C E G B D F A)
C Maj b9 11 13 (C E G B Db F A)
C Maj #9 11 13 (C E G B D# F A)
C Maj #11 13 (C E G B D F# A)
C Maj b9 #11 13 (C E G B Db F# A)
C Maj #9 #11 13 (C E G B D# F# A)
C Min11 13 (C Eb G Bb D F A)
C Min b9 11 13 (C Eb G Bb Db F A)
C Min #9 11 13 (C Eb G Bb D# F A)
C Min #11 13 (C Eb G Bb D F# A)
C Min b9 #11 13 (C Eb G Bb Db F# A)
C Min #9 #11 13 (C Eb G Bb D# F# A)
C Min Maj 13 (C Eb G B D F A)
C Min Maj b9 11 (C Eb G B Db F A)
C Min Maj #9 11 13 (C Eb G B D# F A)
C Min Maj #11 13 (C Eb G B D F# A)
C Min Maj b9 #11 13 (C Eb G B Db F# A)
C Min Maj #9 #11 13 (C Eb G B D# F# A)
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#34
Quote by opiekundps2015
I do not have time to study here

Follow my instructions and it won't take that much time. You would already have done it in the 7 and a half hours between your replies if you just had started doing it. If you want to learn something, you need to do it yourself. If you just read the correct answers, you will not learn anything and you will end up asking the same questions over and over again.

I gave you advice on how to figure out the chord names. Now you should be able to do it. I won't do it for you. If you have some questions regarding chord naming (for example if some of my advice wasn't clear), I can help. But I'm not going to just give you the correct answers because you won't learn anything from that, so it will be basically useless. I'm not going to waste my time on that.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 8, 2017,
#35
While a list is possible to write, it's going to be useless most of the time. Just because a note appears at the same time as a chord doesn't mean it's a chord tone that gets figured into the chord's name. 

Classical music is almost entirely triadic, and it's not like the composers wrote down the chord names on the score. Even in jazz you only seldom see specific indications past the 9th. That kind of stuff is generally up to the player, in which case the name of the chord is last thing you're thinking about.

Basically it's pretty pointless just to know how to name these things. Understanding how the "extensions" actually work in the music is the bigger idea, and you won't get that from the chord name.
#38
 How about this

c,e,g#,b,d,f,a - C+maj 11/13
d,f,a,c,e,g#,b - Dm13#11
e,g#,b,d,f,a,c - E13 b9/11 or E phryg b13 add10
f,a,c,e,g#,b,d - Fmaj13#9#11
g#,b,d,f,a,c,e - G#dim7b11b5b13
a,c,e,g#,b,d,f - Ammaj11b13
b,d,f,a,c,e,g# - Bm13b5b9


 The full name would be F#m11b13b5 


f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d - F#m11b5b9b13  not like this?
#39
Opiekundps2015---Don't you think that's  way for shortcuts?
Spreading seven notes on five triads is not a big challenge
but if we take this notes f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d...hm.

f# - root
a - terce
c - triton!!
e -  septime
g# - second / ninth
b - quart / eleventh
d - sext / thirteenth

----------------------------------------------------------------------
...F#dim7/#9/b11/b13 ??? no such animal...put it in a progression with chord voicings to see if it "works" .. being a dim quality it would have the same voicing in F# A C and Eb ..so make it work to resolve to Gmaj Bbmaj Db maj and Emaj..

try Ted Greens "Chord Chemistry" and see how he names chords and uses them in a harmonic context..
 
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Jul 9, 2017,
#40
opiekundps2015

c,e,g#,b,d,f,a - C+maj 11/13 - correct, though I would probably call it Cmaj13#5
d,f,a,c,e,g#,b - Dm13#11 - correct
e,g#,b,d,f,a,c - E13 b9/11 or E phryg b13 add10 - E13b9 would be the better choice. "Ephryg" would be a pretty confusing chord name.
f,a,c,e,g#,b,d - Fmaj13#9#11 - correct
g#,b,d,f,a,c,e - G#dim7b11b5b13 - b9 not b5. Otherwise technically correct, though I'm not sure about the "b11"... Then again, I'm not sure if there's a better way of marking it.
a,c,e,g#,b,d,f - Ammaj11b13 - correct
b,d,f,a,c,e,g# - Bm13b5b9 - correct

f#,a,c,e,g#,b,d - F#m11b5b9b13  not like this?

No, because the chord doesn't have a b9 in it. F#-G# is a major 9th. If it was a b9, it would have a G natural in it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115