#1
Hey everyone, so I've been working on writing a country song recently. Its one of those slower paced breakup songs, I'm sure y'all know the ones I'm talking about. Ive been using a G-Em-D chord progression in my verse. I've been listening to country music my whole life and would say I know a great deal about it, but I am a bit new to actual songwriting with chords. Haven't really heard this progression in many country songs out there, but it sounds pretty fitting for my lyrics and the way I play the song out. Just wondering if any more experienced songwriters out there can tell me if this is a good chord progression I could use, or if I should try to switch anything up. Thanks y'all!
#2
Only you can say if it's good or if you need to change anything up about it or not.  It's entirely down to your ears and how you want the song to sound.
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#3
It's a very popular chord progression which means it sounds 'good'. I don't want to tell you how to write your song either, but don't be afraid of writing a 3 chord, they are usually the best ones imo. Making it sound country will all come down to your rhythm, lyrics, and vocals
#4
If you like it, it's good. Music is about so much more than a chord progression. The only relevant question is, does your melody fit the chord progression? If not, you may want to change the chords. But if the melody sounds fine with the chords, then the chord progression is good.

Also, those chords aren't anything special. They are some of the most common chords in the key of G major (or D major - I can't really be 100% sure about the key of the song without hearing it, but either way, those would still be very common chords).

You can write a country song with almost any chord progression. A style of music is not defined by a chord progression. It has a lot more to do with rhythm and arrangement. And most likely if there's something that sounds "wrong" about your song, it has nothing to do with the chord progression itself.
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#5
Country uses all the same standard chord progressions as the rest of popular music.

I IV V I
I V vi IV
I vi IV V
I vi V IV
I vi ii V
I IV ii V
vi V I
ii V I
i VII VI
VI VII i

Literally like 75+% of what's on the radio right now in any style of music. 

Hell you can look up some of the best country players and most of their music is dead simple. I'm not sure I've heard a Vince Gill song with more than 4 chords. 
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 11, 2017,