#1
So I was sitting and trying some of the licks in the following tutorial:

;t=255s

The first two licks are straight 16th notes. I started playing around with these over a shuffle blues backing track. It was a bit awkward and also difficult to play the licks as straight 16th notes, I felt. How do you guys usually do in these situations? I guess some licks are meant to be played straight over a shuffle, so it is best to work hard and trying to nail those quadruplets. But otherwise, do you convert straight licks based on feel from straight to shuffle? After all, it takes quiet some time to get licks right so I want to practice the right things from start. I guess the rhythmic pattern would be converted to either triplets or sextuplets, if written out.How do you cope with this? 
Last edited by Guitarxor at Jul 11, 2017,
#2
i don't convert licks because i don't play licks. "licks" are back pocket things you use when you blank, or to link between your melodies and harmonies. they're good for getting a snapshot of how you might approach something melodically, but you really should get in the habit of playing what your ear wants to hear rather than what your hand wants to do
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#3
First, learn some actual stevie ray vaughan - listen to the texas flood album and there is a goldmine of solos there.

Learning licks in isolation is really not a great way to absorb the musicality behind it. You need musical context and learning actual solos is the way to do it.

Mary had a little lamb, Tell me and Pride and Joy have relatively accessible solos. If you want to learn Stevie's style you need to go to the source and hear his phrasing in context.
#4
Hail And what if your ears want to hear a lick? I like how Justin Sandercoe likens licks to words in a language, and soloing would be like putting words together to a story that makes sense in a certain context. When wanting to write a story, we need words. I tried "total freestyling" and that did not work for me, I got lost. From what I hear, all great soloists use a lot of licks whether they are aware of it or not. Clapton was aware of it and in my opinion he is a pretty decent guitarist



But yes, indeed it is the ears that tells us what works or not.

reverb66 Well, that could make some sense. But then I will want to reuse things I learned in other contexts too, for instance play that Texas shuffle lick in some straight rock song and vice versa.

I guess many people convert licks between different rhythmic patterns based on feeling. But I believe it is a bit difficult, so I guess I am looking for a starting point on how to approach this.
#5
Quote by Guitarxor
Hail And what if your ears want to hear a lick? I like how Justin Sandercoe likens licks to words in a language, and soloing would be like putting words together to a story that makes sense in a certain context. .


that'd be all well and good if soloing was what music was about. out of great music in the world, probably .01% of it includes a guitar solo.
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#6
Quote by Guitarxor
Hail And what if your ears want to hear a lick?


Then listen to a recording. There is more to lead playing than learning a bunch of licks and throwing them together.
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#7
Quote by Hail
that'd be all well and good if soloing was what music was about. out of great music in the world, probably .01% of it includes a guitar solo.
It depends on what you yourself consider to be great music, but sure a solo of any kind isn't essential in most music. But then we have melodic lines and riffs instead, which similarily to licks are usually pre-rehearsed. I don't think any music emerges out of a complete void, but rather from things we rehearsed or heard one time or another.


Quote by theogonia777
Then listen to a recording. There is more to lead playing than learning a bunch of licks and throwing them together.

Sure there is. But an example to why I believe licks are necessary. Take an awesome (according to me) solo such as the one from Free Bird. It is actually a lot of licks and pre-rehearsed moves "thrown together". Sure it is not enough to just know all those licks to invent and play such a solo. But, it is a bare minimum. Nobody invents all those things on a fly. I do not think anybody can play such a solo without first practicing a lot of licks.
#8
Quote by Guitarxor
It depends on what you yourself consider to be great music, but sure a solo of any kind isn't essential in most music. But then we have melodic lines and riffs instead, which similarily to licks are usually pre-rehearsed. I don't think any music emerges out of a complete void, but rather from things we rehearsed or heard one time or another.


> 99% of music period has no guitar solos and probably no lead guitar at all if guitar is even present


Take an awesome (according to me) solo such as the one from Free Bird.


Boring (according to me and most people that don't listen to classic rock) solo. It doesn't go anywhere. It doesn't build up. It doesn't venture out of the same 4 or 5 licks in a five minute solo. Half of it is bends that sound like the "hee-haw" of a donkey.
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Last edited by theogonia777 at Jul 16, 2017,
#10
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
Hey now, licks are all right.

Try to have at least 10 things to play over every type of chord imo

Each starting from a different chord tone

I mean, you have to start somewhere

Charlie Parker used licks just like everyone else


10 different licks with a different chord tone? That means you gotta have a 10 tone chord. ; )

There's also a difference between throwing in the occasional lick as a fill or to connect original ideas and trying to create solos by just throwing a bunch of different licks from other songs together.
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#11
10 different licks each starting from the tonic, 3rd 5th

then get more interesting

It's really just a goal to get someone started. Because if you learn a lick, then vary the lick, then internalize the sounds the lick presented to you, then you can rearrange them in an original way

it's better than just trying to be "original" and being shit until you realize that you might want to know some genre cliches because those are what make that genre what it is
#12
Quote by Guitarxor


reverb66 Well, that could make some sense. But then I will want to reuse things I learned in other contexts too, for instance play that Texas shuffle lick in some straight rock song and vice versa.

I guess many people convert licks between different rhythmic patterns based on feeling. But I believe it is a bit difficult, so I guess I am looking for a starting point on how to approach this.

You're missing my point, which is actually very important if you want to have musicality in your playing.  The reason you want to learn licks and solos within a musical context first is that you will  better understand how it fits within a song, a chord progression, a beat, and a bass line. This information will make transposing it in other similar or dissimilar contexts easier and it will also make remembering it easier. A lick by itself means almost nothing, you need to hear it in relation to other notes ( chords, bass notes etc.) - all of that contextual information matters. Players that just rehash generic licks regardless of context are the worst players - don't be a cliche - learn strong source material first and pay attention to the musical context.

You can play almost any lick in any context, but your time will be better spent learning actual great licks from actual great players in actual great songs first.  
Last edited by reverb66 at Jul 18, 2017,