#1
I am trying to adjust my guitar  with a 2-Way Adjustable Rod   and give it  some back bow to get the neck straight , and when I turn the  hex key right if gives it bow it feels  tight , so I have turned it a few time to the left but it  feels lose, just want to know  if I keep turning it left will it start to tighten up at some point  or am I doing something wrong ?,
#2
Every truss rod is 2-way; counterclockwise loosens it up and you'll get the neck a little bowed, clockwise tightens it up and so you'll get the neck straight. That's not how it works, you can't just turn it to one side expecting it to do the opposite effect at some point.
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#3
Quote by andre.fontes.es
Every truss rod is 2-way; counterclockwise loosens it up and you'll get the neck a little bowed, clockwise tightens it up and so you'll get the neck straight. That's not how it works, you can't just turn it to one side expecting it to do the opposite effect at some point.

hi! I have done a Gibson and never had a problem , but after doing some research I think you can get trust rods that tighten both ways to give you back bow or front bow ,   so I think the lose I'm getting is the  between  and if I keep turning its going to tighten . are you sure you are right i was thinking 2 way trussed rods because you can adjust it in two ways , well I'm hoping this is true because it gives bow when turning it right.
#4
and the other strange thing is Although it feel lose to turn  the trust rod the  neck is straight with a very small or tiny bit of bow , surly the neck wont stay like this without some sort of tension from the trust rod . 
#5
andre.fontes.es  maybe this is what he meant? I'm also curious about this, so this isn't a traditional truss rod or it is?

[h]Dual action truss rod[/h]

A dual action (also known as two way or double expanding)  truss rod is a more modern design and it is currently being used by  some luthiers in lieu of the vintage single truss rod. The dual action  rod is installed in a straight channel in the wood as opposed to the  curved channel used by vintage rods. The two-way rod can warp the neck  in either direction, either creating more relief or less.
A neck with a two way rod installed is often more stable and less  influenced by climate changes, as well as being able to restraighten  twisted necks, which can be a hefty repair for other guitars. However,  some players believe the dual action truss system has an adverse effect  on the tone of the instrument, due to the weight of the second rod and  the additional wood removal required for installation (although not all  two-way systems 
#6
yes I have just found it does adjust both way first time I have come across this,  now the problem  I am having now is this -  I have a guitar with an adjustable 2 way truss rod  and  its like you turn it left give bow right give back bow ,  but there is a part in between the middle were the truss rod feels lose not tight , the problem is my guitar neck for the most Is straight with maybe a tiny bit of bow . I was reading this about truss rod adjustment although it not everything I am just quoting the part I need 

"It is very important that this neck relief adjustment is done carefully and to get it right at once as if you need to later come back this step you need to repeat all the following setup steps again. Leave always the truss rod to state where there is at least some small tension, that will prevent it resonating with the guitar neck"

So this is telling my the trust rod need to have some tension so should I give my guitar neck more bow so the truss rod is tighter ? 
#7
Quote by andre.fontes.es
Every truss rod is 2-way; counterclockwise loosens it up and you'll get the neck a little bowed, clockwise tightens it up and so you'll get the neck straight. That's not how it works, you can't just turn it to one side expecting it to do the opposite effect at some point.

I think when the TS said 2-way they meant double action.  That means that a truss rod can push forward bow into the neck or pull back bow into the neck.  Not all truss rods are dual action even though they are the most common type in modern guitars you can still find some makes and models that use the old school truss rods that can't push a forward bow into the neck.

dazzzer30 The truss rods primary function is to give the neck enough relief that you don't get fret buzz.  Having the strings feel tight or loose is a secondary effect so be sure to keep that in mind when you adjust it.  When you adjust the truss rod you need to put a capo on the 1st fret of the guitar and then push the strings down on the the highest fret then look at the space between the top of the 5th fret and the string.  It should be around 1mm give or take.  If the relief is too high (truss rod too loose) you will get buzzing on the upper frets.  If it's too low (truss rod too tight) then you will get buzzing on the lower frets.  You do get a little bit of wiggle room so if the strings feel to spongy and loose then loosen your truss rod, adjust your action see how it feels and make sure you are not getting any buzz on the high frets.  Only go 1/4 turn at a time.  If your strings feel too tight then tighten your truss rod, adjust your action, see how it feels, and make sure you are not getting buzz on the low frets.  Again only go 1/4 turn at a time.  You might have to make several small adjustments over several days befor you find the sweet spot that is right for you.  
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#9
If by little turn you mean 1/4 of a revolution then yes.  It could potentially be more than 5 or 6 depending on how far off it is.   Just be sure you only go a little at a time then retune the guitar.  This helps the truss rod settle.  If you do several turns all in one go it can seem good at 1st but then when your guitar neck settles and gets used to the new adjustment it can pull itself out of adjustment.
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