#1
Hi everyone,

I need some help with my amp/pedal settings or maybe some new stuff/pedal.
I've bought new gear after quiting for 5 years.
I love playing the guitar again and I'm getting better everyday.

I'm in love with my new amp/guitar and pedal but I'm still looking for that more warm/harmonic distortion sound.
For example the mid slow solo part of suicide and redemption (metallica) or the classical Iron Maiden warm sound (2 different things I know, but I hope you know what I mean). The powerd chords and low fret tones are awesome but the higher fret tones with distortion are not as warm as I want it to be. I'm sorry if I'm not saying it right I'm still a noob.
You guys have any idea?

Set up:
amp: marshall dsl15c
guitar:Jackson SLATXMG 3-6
pedal: Mooer Green Mile
#2
You have the tools already. Keep in mind that both are 2 guitar bands that are good at layering guitars. Part of it is that you need to use less distortion than you might think. Harmonics turn to mush when there is to much distortion. Make sure you aren't dialing out you mids and experiment with your tone settings
#3
And don't forget about your neck pickup - that warms up the high notes.  You can also try the 18V or 23V (if you don't have room for the 18V) mod for your EMGs and see if you like that - very easily reversible - just google it.  
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#4
Emphasizing the midrange is key. The TS9-based Mooer and the Marshall will definitely do you favors in that regard. Just do not scoop mids. Also keep in mind that those records will often have the highs of the guitar masked by the cymbals, or cut down some with EQ in post. You may not hear the "warmness" you are seeking until you listen to your amp in a proper mix.
#5
Quote by Will Lane
Emphasizing the midrange is key. The TS9-based Mooer and the Marshall will definitely do you favors in that regard. Just do not scoop mids. Also keep in mind that those records will often have the highs of the guitar masked by the cymbals, or cut down some with EQ in post. You may not hear the "warmness" you are seeking until you listen to your amp in a proper mix.

good points. some of the tones i've used for recording sounded like total ass when heard alone. put them in a band mix and suddenly they sound great.