#1
I'm quite a novice on guitar even though I've been playing on and off for several years. I pick a song on spotify decide I want to learn in then 10 minutes later I'm on a different song. It took me a couple of years to get into my head that I don't need to get the strumming pattern to sound exactly like the song. Now I'm having a hard time getting my head around the same song being played with either different chords or a different chord in the progession.

For example Breakeven - The Script (Verse)

Em - G - D - A7 (here on ultimate guitar)  https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/t/the_script/breakeven_crd.htm


Em - G - D - Cadd9: youtube  ;


Surely even just a small chorde change like that changes the whole dynamic of a song? 
#2
Am7, not A7. Also, you have the G and D chords in the wrong order. It should be Em-D-G-Am7. But I'm pretty sure that was just a typo.

Am7 and C major are really close to each other. Am7 = A C E G, C major = C E G. That's why you can substitute Am7 with C major and vice versa most of the time (well, it depends on the context). But the correct chord is Am7. I don't know why she decided to use C major in the video.

When it comes to chord tabs in general, you shouldn't trust on them 100% (even if they have a good rating). It's the same thing with lesson videos (especially if we are talking about this kind of "singer songwriter" type of lessons - that kind of musicians many times tend to simplify the songs), though I think they are usually a bit more reliable. You need to always use your ears, and if something just doesn't sound right, it most likely isn't. But changing an Am7 chord to C major is not a big deal and it's really not going to change the sound much.

It is possible to reharmonize songs, but that's a whole another topic. It has to do with finding other chords that would fit the same melody. (For example if the melody has a C in it, you could use any chord that has a C in it to harmonize it. If we are only talking about minor and major triads, the possible choices for the note C would be C, Cm, F, Fm, Ab and Am. But that's only minor and major triads - the note in the melody could also be the 6th, 7th, 9th, sometimes even 11th - but that's a bit more advanced stuff.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 14, 2017,
#3
I agree with the above thoughts. If you go to YouTube and search for any popular song with "How to play (insert song)" you find different players showing you their way of playing the song. They will often use different inversions, add or delete some suspended notes etc. Some do it to keep it simple for players who want to play the song but are just learning guitar and don't have the advanced skills needed for that song. Some do it because that's what they hear and they may be limited by their own skill level. Some are just wrong but don't know it. Remember it's free information that can be posted by anyone and it might just be a good starting point to learn a song. If you hear changes that don't seem quite right it means you are getting more perceptive and starting to learn to play by ear and that's a positive thing
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jul 15, 2017,
#4
Having listened to the song, the chords on the intro (when the band starts) are

Cmaj7 - G - Dadd4 - Em

The verse chords are only partial, but seem to be

Em - Dsus4 - G - Am7

That D chord definitely has no F# in it, a G note instead.

The chords for the chorus are the same as intro, although the first chord then sounds more like Cmaj9, or G/C. This is probably where the youtube girl got her Cadd9 from, which has the D in it (9), but not the B (maj7).
She also play an Em7, whereas it sounds to me more likke a plain Em. And she doesn;t play that Dadd4, just a straight D.
Those are all acceptable variants, although Cmaj7 is easy enough (x-3-2-0-0-0) and sounds better. Cmaj9 = x-3-2-4-3-0, and G/D = x-3-5-4-3-(0), if you want to try those, but they're trickier. (Nothing wrong with Cadd9, though, if you like that.)

In general, one thing to bear in mind with band songs like this is that the sound of the chords arises from the combination of guitars and bass (and sometimes keyboards),and getting things to sound right on one guitar may be a challenge. That's why alternative versions of each chord can sometimes be OK. It only has to sound right enough, not 100% the same!
#5
Sometimes tabs from reputable players can be wrong too

Buster B Jones's tab for Jerrie's Breakdown is wrong. Maybe it's his version, or he had someone else write it down, but it's not what Jerry plays

It's always good to use your ears, even if you trust the person
#6
jonriley64

Actually, I guess it makes sense now. She probably uses C major instead of Am7 because the chorus has a C major chord in it. And if you change the Am to C major, you can play the whole song with just four chords instead of five chords.

When it comes to the Cadd9 and the Em7, I guess she uses those because of the pedal G and D on the high E and B strings. This way the voicings have a lot of common tones and just a couple of the notes are changing. Reminds me a bit of "Wonderwall". But yeah, Em7, G major and Cadd9 just sound good together because they are really similar voicings (0 2 2 0 3 3, 3 2 0 0 3 3, x 3 2 0 3 3) and they are also very easy to play one after the other.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115