#1
 I mean, Is it possible to use the fingerpicking classical musicians use in their classical guitars on the electric guitar? Do we have to use the same position? 
Do we have to grow long nail or use finger picks? 




 
#2
Electric guitar players have used fingerpicking on electrics before. Some electrics work better than others. If you want the same attack, you use the same fingernails (or finger picks).

And you're required to wear panty hose if you do.
#3
Quote by dspellman
Electric guitar players have used fingerpicking on electrics before. Some electrics work better than others. If you want the same attack, you use the same fingernails (or finger picks).

And you're required to wear panty hose if you do.

damn i knew i was doing something wrong no hose  

yes you can. sticking to the classical style positioning would likely make playing easier. 

The Doors guitar player Robbie Krieger played fingerstyle and was very successful. 
#6
You might also want to favor an electric with a wider, flatter fingerboard, which will feel more like that of a classical guitar's.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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#7
I can't see any reason not to, but there are limitations. I fingerpick both nylon string and steel string acoustics, and have not found it possible to get any satisfaction from playing electric, except for slide. The reason is the difference in attack and sustain between acoustics and electrics. The long sustain of electrics turns the sound of a "busy" fingerpicking piece into sonic mush. Players like Ry Cooder make skillful use of string damping, but still play a fairly lean style on electric compared with what they could do on acoustic
#8
I play classical and electric -  electric fingerstyle playing requires a different approach.  The big difference is muting, palm muting and dampening - those are much more important on eletcric and I find the classical position ( right hand free floating) to be terrible for  that, especially if you're playing with overdrive etc. .  Study electric fingerstyle players to get a feel for what works.  
#9
many jazz players use classical techniques but it is hardly "classical guitar" two worlds .. fingers apart .. yes the overtones are going to feedback on an electric which is not a concern on a nylon string classical..the pure classical fingering on electric strings would take a lot of work to get the subtle flavors a nylon/plastic string guitar..

chet atkins came close to playing it .. so much so that Segovia complimented him..until he found out chet played electric guitar
play well

wolf
#10
Electric guitar fingerpicking is pretty different technically than classical guitar. You won't want to use fingernails for electric. Both because it sounds bad and because you'll end up ripping off a fingernail at some point. The actual hand position is also completely different. 

Look up some videos players like Chet Atkins, Mark Knopfler, and Joe Pass if you want to see what high-level electric fingertsyle looks like. 
#11
cdgraves 

You can add Ry Cooder to that list.

Re technique and fingernails. I use my nails, but I in order to palm damp, I would have to rotate my rotate my hand so that the thumb nail can't reach the string, only the side of my thumb. You can see that in Ry Cooder's vids, I can't do it. The other nails are OK though.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jul 19, 2017,
#12
Holy shit I recorded and produced that video earlier this year! I'm happy to see it's getting around. How do you guys like the video presentation and audio? Here's the full thing:


Also here's my recording company website: www.enharmonicrecords.com
Last edited by TSaxnBassist at Jul 20, 2017,
#13
thepresentense growing your picking hand fingernails is a good idea anyway as it makes hybrid picking so much more satisfying. Be sure to use a nail hardener though as steel strings will chew through your nails.
Quote by Charles Ives
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#14
Quote by DissonantTimbre
thepresentense growing your picking hand fingernails is a good idea anyway as it makes hybrid picking so much more satisfying. Be sure to use a nail hardener though as steel strings will chew through your nails.

I'd actually recommend just going flesh on strings. I find fingernail tone absolutely awful on electric guitar. You can't get a good snap with the fingernails. 
#15
Quote by TSaxnBassist
Holy shit I recorded and produced that video earlier this year! I'm happy to see it's getting around. How do you guys like the video presentation and audio? 

It looks and sounds good! The notes I would have for the video are that the lighting is a bit harsh and the mic stands distract a little from the "classical performance" feel. For the audio, you could probably back the mics off a little bit to capture some of the natural acoustics, which ought to make the instrument sound less raw.
#16
Quote by cdgraves
It looks and sounds good! The notes I would have for the video are that the lighting is a bit harsh and the mic stands distract a little from the "classical performance" feel. For the audio, you could probably back the mics off a little bit to capture some of the natural acoustics, which ought to make the instrument sound less raw.

Thanks for the feedback! Normally we put the closeup mics in different spots in front of her but we needed to space them out for the sake of the video camera seeing her, so they pretty much had to be in the shot to get any decent sound. Then what you don't see are a pair of raised omni mics 10' from her and another pair of raised hall mics about 50' from her. The majority of the sound is coming from those 4 off camera mics and then we blended in the spot mics to taste. 

Her manager asked us to focus on her finger techniques so we needed those spot mics for the sound plus those various camera angles depending on what she was playing. I'm glad the video is clear enough for other guitarists to be able to study her technique because she is an amazing performer in person. Her teacher is the legendary Jason Vieaux.
#17
Sometimes I use classical style if I go through a specific run it's all preference. No right or wrong way to play guitar. You do you.
#18
Quote by dspellman
Electric guitar players have used fingerpicking on electrics before. Some electrics work better than others. If you want the same attack, you use the same fingernails (or finger picks).

And you're required to wear panty hose if you do.

Actually, the nails tend to reduce attack when used appropriately. That's what they're for, instead of stopping a ringing string with flesh, pulling back and launching the notes like you're playing a catapult, nails (when smooth enough) can near entirely reduce that pause and popping tone to nil, while still producing a tone that has volume and intensity. There are too many things to name really, but suffice it to say they're not there to be realized. A good tone is just that, a good note that surpasses the actions needed to hear it. So in many cases, you won't actually want to hear what made the note, and that can often come down to having very little attack, unless it's a specific part in the music that calls for it.

Mind you, this is where it concerns classical music. Flamenco is different, electric guitar in general also takes a different approach, but classical music doesn't shove the music's rhythmic qualities in your face like many other styles do. And that's a very important difference, the guitar is not very often a rhythmically functioning instrument in classical music, at least not in the way it is in other genres.

As for the original post, yes you can. But since the electric guitar produces its sound through a different method than a purely acoustic instrument, so some of the sound you're producing will get lost. Personally, I dislike using nails on steel strings, because the strings produce a dreadful sound once they've worn a bit. Metal can get a bit porous after all.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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Last edited by FretboardToAsh at Jul 24, 2017,
#19
FretboardToAsh 
Quote by FretboardToAsh
Actually, the nails tend to reduce attack when used appropriately. That's what they're for, instead of stopping a ringing string with flesh, pulling back and launching the notes like you're playing a catapult, nails (when smooth enough) can near entirely reduce that pause and popping tone to nil, while still producing a tone that has volume and intensity. There are too many things to name really, but suffice it to say they're not there to be realized. A good tone is just that, a good note that surpasses the actions needed to hear it. So in many cases, you won't actually want to hear what made the note, and that can often come down to having very little attack, unless it's a specific part in the music that calls for it.

Mind you, this is where it concerns classical music. Flamenco is different, electric guitar in general also takes a different approach, but classical music doesn't shove the music's rhythmic qualities in your face like many other styles do. And that's a very important difference, the guitar is not very often a rhythmically functioning instrument in classical music, at least not in the way it is in other genres.

As for the original post, yes you can. But since the electric guitar produces its sound through a different method than a purely acoustic instrument, so some of the sound you're producing will get lost. Personally, I dislike using nails on steel strings, because the strings produce a dreadful sound once they've worn a bit. Metal can get a bit porous after all.

The first paragraph perfectly describes what country guys like Brent Mason do
Quote by Charles Ives
Stand up and take your dissonance like a man. I don't write music for sissy ears.

Quote by Béla Bartók
Competitions are for horses, not artists.
#21
Quote by reverb66
The problem with nails on electric is that they break. The  tone is great until they do.

You just have to deal with it if you play electric and nylon string, there's no way around it.

I find I can keep my nails at an appropriate length for classical music without them getting on the strings too much when I play fingerstyle on the electric. Just gotta keep on the filing, and some fingernail shapes may be easier than others.
#22
Quote by cdgraves
I find I can keep my nails at an appropriate length for classical music without them getting on the strings too much when I play fingerstyle on the electric. Just gotta keep on the filing, and some fingernail shapes may be easier than others.


when I use my fingers on chord runs I keep my nails very short and the three fingers I use most on chords I angle them so the string slides off the nail not under it
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Jul 24, 2017,