#1
very recently I bought an YAMAHA PACIFICA 112(V) and the MICROCUBE because I wanted to switch from acoustic to electric, however, I am quite confused by how difficult it is to create different tones out of this amplifier. I can sort-of recreate the "distortion" tone by maximizing the TONE and GAIN, but I cannot tune the amplifier to sound like how the "overdriven" guitars usually are. do I need to buy any of the overdrive pedals just to have the tone itself? I have read some articles about overdrive VS distortion, but I have no idea how to control or determine whether my setting is creating a HARD/ SOFT "clipping". (PS: sorry for broken English I am not an native speaker.) tl;dr - can I create the overdrive effects on a roland microcube or I need the pedals.
Last edited by maxloo2 at Jul 18, 2017,
#2
You can create overdriven tones with the Roland Microcube, just not good ones.

What you really need is a new amp.
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#3
The Roland cube is a modelling amp. It models a few amps. A recto. A Marshall jcm, an ac30, etc. The Marshall and recto models should give you a good overdriven sound. The ac-30 and Marshall (with less gain) model will give you a crunch.
#4
You're playing through a Microcube, what do you expect? Those amps are marketed primarily for the fact that they're cheap and portable, particularly good for busking etc. I own one myself and it's fantastic for throwing in the car and busking etc, but I would never for the life of me use it in a serious setting where I want my tone to be as nice as possible. Its simply a means to get the job done when I can't carry around 50kg of gear etc. Pedals aren't really going to achieve anything with such an amp. If you want a real good overdriven tone then invest in a tube amp.
PS: I actually really like the clean tones, I find them rather impressive for such a little amp, but the distorted tones are abysmal.
Last edited by vayne92 at Jul 18, 2017,
#7
Quote by maxloo2
very recently I bought an YAMAHA PACIFICA 112(V) and the MICROCUBE because I wanted to switch from acoustic to electric, however, I am quite confused by how difficult it is to create different tones out of this amplifier. I can sort-of recreate the "distortion" tone by maximizing the TONE and GAIN, but I cannot tune the amplifier to sound like how the "overdriven" guitars usually are. do I need to buy any of the overdrive pedals just to have the tone itself? I have read some articles about overdrive VS distortion, but I have no idea how to control or determine whether my setting is creating a HARD/ SOFT "clipping". (PS: sorry for broken English I am not an native speaker.) tl;dr - can I create the overdrive effects on a roland microcube or I need the pedals.

1) set the amp to Brit Combo
2) raise the gain  past 12 o clock and  lower the " Volume" accordingly.  - More gain and less volume = more overdrive.
3) set the reverb to taste - you need the reverb on that amp to get good tone - three or four notches in is good. 
4) set the Tone flat ( 12 o clock) - only make minor adjustments for the tone control.
5) use either the neck pickup or the bridge pickup - don't use the "in between" positions on your guitar.

Make sure your volume on your guitar is maxed and your guitar tone controls are maxed as well - no roll off for overdrive.

This will give you  the best overdrive that amp can produce.  It's not high gain, but it's decent for a 5 watt speaker.  The Marshall and Rectifier settings don't sound good, neither does the Fender. 

Lower the gain and raise the volume accordingly for clean tones - again, the "Brit Combo" has the best tones by far for clean and overdrive. 

Don't buy a pedal for that amp.

The amp is actually good at what it does if you use it right.
 
Last edited by reverb66 at Jul 18, 2017,
#8
The Brit combo is the AC 30 model. I misunderstood the original post but the above suggestion sounds good. A blasted AC30 tone is what you want for that bluesy overdriven but not super distorted tone. Stack is the JCM 800 model and modern or recto .... whatever is the rectifier model. My memory is a little fuzzy as I have my micro-cube to my sister a few years back to learn guitar. It's a fun little small amp.
#9
Quote by maxloo2
very recently I bought an YAMAHA PACIFICA 112(V) and the MICROCUBE because I wanted to switch from acoustic to electric, however, I am quite confused by how difficult it is to create different tones out of this amplifier. I can sort-of recreate the "distortion" tone by maximizing the TONE and GAIN, but I cannot tune the amplifier to sound like how the "overdriven" guitars usually are. do I need to buy any of the overdrive pedals just to have the tone itself? I have read some articles about overdrive VS distortion, but I have no idea how to control or determine whether my setting is creating a HARD/ SOFT "clipping". (PS: sorry for broken English I am not an native speaker.) tl;dr - can I create the overdrive effects on a roland microcube or I need the pedals.

It sounds like you haven't discovered the different amp models on the Microcube yet (the knob to the left of the Gain and Volume controls). It can simulate the sound of several different styles of amp, and whilst it obviously isn't going to sound the same as a full-sized amp it still sounds way better than a tiny £90 should be able to.

As a very rough guide your models are

Acoustic - clean tone that sounds more like an acoustic guitar
JC clean - clean tone
Black Panel - Fender-type clean tone with a bit more character than the JC clean setting
Brit Combo - Vox-style overdrive, a bit raucous and bitey. Play around with the gain and tone using this model for a rattier overdriven sound
Classic Stack - typical, classic rock style Marshally distortion, with lower gain you can also get a more overdriven type tone from this model
Rfier - modern, metal-style distortion...even on lower gain settings it still won't sound much like overdrive.
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#10
Quote by risingforce1
The Brit combo is the AC 30 model. I misunderstood the original post but the above suggestion sounds good. A blasted AC30 tone is what you want for that bluesy overdriven but not super distorted tone.  Stack is the JCM 800 model and modern or recto .... whatever is the rectifier model. My memory is a little fuzzy as I have my micro-cube to my sister a few years back to learn guitar. It's a fun little small amp.


My point is that the Brit Combo has the best tones period - the other models just don't sound as good for that speaker. The Fender tone sucks compared to the Brit set to clean, the Marshall doesn't sound as good as the Brit cranked etc. 

With that amp you need to play to its strenght, which is the Brit. 
#11
I thought the Marshall model was "alright" and I used it the most but I am a metal guy. I believe JC is the Roland Jazz Chorus model.