#1
I have quite small hands and sadly I can't mute the top string with my thumb (Just a little bit off).
I could mute the top E string but my hand then leans on the bottom E string preventing the E chord from ringing out which is obviously not ideal either.

I could strum just the 5 strings but with me playing songs I really doubt I would have the coordination to miss a string each time  

So I was wondering, is the only thing I can do it let the top E string ring out? is it extremely noticable? is there a way around it that I havent thought of? 

Any help would be greatly appreaciated.
#2
I don't necessarily see the problem here. Muting with your thumb and keeping your hand in the "baseball bat" position works for some people, but it isn't really a standard technique tbh. A lot of people plant their thumb on the back of the neck, which I'd consider ideal technique, and have no problems with muting the low E and A strings. 

If you can't bother with learning how to strum accurately, you can always mute with your fretting hand fingers. If you're playing a chord that only requires three fingers, like open C, you can use the remaining fourth finger to mute the low E. Or if you're playing a barre chord shape, like B minor, you can make contact with the low E string with the tip of your barring finger without actually pressing it down, muting it.
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#3
Quote by Lostforever
I have quite small hands and sadly I can't mute the top string with my thumb (Just a little bit off).
I could mute the top E string but my hand then leans on the bottom E string preventing the E chord from ringing out which is obviously not ideal either.

I could strum just the 5 strings but with me playing songs I really doubt I would have the coordination to miss a string each time

So I was wondering, is the only thing I can do it let the top E string ring out? is it extremely noticable? is there a way around it that I havent thought of?

Any help would be greatly appreaciated.

A lot of people can't do that - the co-ordination to miss the E string is something you need to work on - you'll never stop hitting it unless you start trying to miss it.Hitting the strings you want to hear and not hitting the ones you don't want to hear is a fundamental skill when it comes to playing the guitar.
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#4
Quote by steven seagull
A lot of people can't do that - the co-ordination to miss the E string is something you need to work on - you'll never stop hitting it unless you start trying to miss it.Hitting the strings you want to hear and not hitting the ones you don't want to hear is a fundamental skill when it comes to playing the guitar.

Ding. Ding. Ding. Ding.

Otherwise it's like asking how to curb a smoking addiction without actually making any effort to curb it. If they're not willing to do anything about preventing the  behavior that's fundamentally causing it then why should anyone bother trying to help them.
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#5
Quote by Kevätuhri
I don't necessarily see the problem here. Muting with your thumb and keeping your hand in the "baseball bat" position works for some people, but it isn't really a standard technique tbh. A lot of people plant their thumb on the back of the neck, which I'd consider ideal technique, and have no problems with muting the low E and A strings. 

If you can't bother with learning how to strum accurately, you can always mute with your fretting hand fingers. If you're playing a chord that only requires three fingers, like open C, you can use the remaining fourth finger to mute the low E. Or if you're playing a barre chord shape, like B minor, you can make contact with the low E string with the tip of your barring finger without actually pressing it down, muting it.
Quote by steven seagull
A lot of people can't do that - the co-ordination to miss the E string is something you need to work on - you'll never stop hitting it unless you start trying to miss it.Hitting the strings you want to hear and not hitting the ones you don't want to hear is a fundamental skill when it comes to playing the guitar.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Ding. Ding. Ding. Ding.

Otherwise it's like asking how to curb a smoking addiction without actually making any effort to curb it. If they're not willing to do anything about preventing the  behavior that's fundamentally causing it then why should anyone bother trying to help them.



Tbh I didn't even know it was possible to miss a string or two when strumming at speed and worst of all I thought I was actually learning to strum properly lol

I have mainly been using Andy guitar online (and a few other beginner videos) and the advice to mute with a thumb is highly recommended by many of them.

Either way I will actively try to miss the strings now
#6
Quote by Lostforever
Tbh I didn't even know it was possible to miss a string or two when strumming at speed and worst of all I thought I was actually learning to strum properly lol

I have mainly been using Andy guitar online (and a few other beginner videos) and the advice to mute with a thumb is highly recommended by many of them.

Either way I will actively try to miss the strings now

Strings that are not supposed to ring out are supposed to be muted whenever practical. Even if you don't pluck those strings, the vibration from the guitar can still cause the strings that are not being plucked to vibrate. Which causes non-musical harmonics to occur
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#7
T00DEEPBLUE
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Strings that are not supposed to ring out are supposed to be muted whenever practical. Even if you don't pluck those strings, the vibration from the guitar can still cause the strings that are not being plucked to vibrate. Which causes non-musical harmonics to occur



Ok then I will use my 1st finger which is on the fret board to mute the low E
#8
You can also use the your picking hand to mute strings. When your strum let your wrist or any part of your picking hand gently touch the strings that are not in use while strumming. Now if you are doing cowboy chords with wide aggressive elbow motions that is quite hard but if you strum with some degree of accuracy and minimizing unnecessary motions its quite easy actually. Learning this skill is especially essential when distortion comes into play. Your index fretting hand mutes the unused high strings and picking hand mutes the unused thick low strings. Every string not in use must be muted or you will find your playing noisy as hell. Now if you have only low E to mute you can leave that to the tip of your index finger but when there are more low strings to mute use your picking hand.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jul 20, 2017,
#9
Yes I agree you should be muting the other strings whenever possible. I wish I could play Barre chords with my thumb on the E and A strings but despite practising my hands are just too small I think.. Only thing you can do is work with what God gave you. You are probably going to have to be more accurate in your strumming and work on your right hand muting
#10
use your picking hand to mute and learn how to hit only the strings you need to hit.
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#11
Quote by MaaZeus
You can also use the your picking hand to mute strings. When your strum let your wrist or any part of your picking hand gently touch the strings that are not in use while strumming. Now if you are doing cowboy chords with wide aggressive elbow motions that is quite hard but if you strum with some degree of accuracy and minimizing unnecessary motions its quite easy actually. Learning this skill is especially essential when distortion comes into play. Your index fretting hand mutes the unused high strings and picking hand mutes the unused thick low strings. Every string not in use must be muted or you will find your playing noisy as hell. Now if you have only low E to mute you can leave that to the tip of your index finger but when there are more low strings to mute use your picking hand.
Quote by AcousticMirror
use your picking hand to mute and learn how to hit only the strings you need to hit.


May say you're doing all 8ths strumming (or even down and up throughout) , is it still possible to mute the string with your strumming hand?