Page 1 of 2
#1
Which do you feel is more important?

I feel like the answer should be obvious - playing. I tend to see a lot of guitarists more consumed with gear though than they are with their own playing. It doesn't make much sense to me to have amazing gear if you're only going to use it to play a few chords. Thoughts?
#2
I DON'T NEED ANYONE
DON'T NEED NO MOM AND DAD
mugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmug
#3
If you have the means get amazing gear. Usually amazing gear is easier to play. Im by no means amazing but i started out on a borrowed guitar that was junk and lost interest quick. When i got a decent guitar i started to play more and more. Now i find enjoyment in playing with junk. When ever im in the stores i like to play the cheap guitars, or if im playing for someone for the first time i leave the $1k+ guitars at home and show up with a $70 dollar squier and play the hell out of it.
#4
skill > new amp
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
There shall be a stop to this madness. The battle is not over. My tasty licks aren't going anywhere.

Quote by The_Blode
^ I've just realised if you say Simple Plan's 2011 effort "Get Your Heart On!" really fast in a Southern American accent, it sounds gross. . .like sexual gross!

Quote by Necroheadbanger
Hello.
I'm looking for professional bongo-ists and triangle-ists to make a Progressive Technical Brutal Death Metal band
(will be called AxOxJxLxAxIxVxXxUxWxZxQxUxRxWxGxJxSxAxLxKxMxNxHxUxGxAxAxWxVxCxBxZxVx)
(Don't even ask what it means)


https://soundcloud.com/95dank



#5
One is not objectively better for everyone. Some find fulfillment in collecting quality gear and some find fulfillment in mastering them. Just depends on your hobby.
Quote by SGstriker
If KFC is finger-licking good, then people would probably suck dicks for Popeyes. That's how good it is.


There's nothing left here to be saved
Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#6
If you want gear and can afford it, buy it.

I don't give a flying fuck if you buy every single one of Fender's limited edition George Harrison Rosewood Teles, but couldn't play Twist And Shout without a year's tuition on that song and that song alone.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#7
I try to do both. I love collecting gear - not necessarily $2000 guitars each time, but I like trying out different sounds, with different guitars and amps and effects.
A Gibson Les Paul Standard sounds and plays different than a PRS SE Custom. I like discovering new sounds and appeals. I don't have the need to know every single chord in all of existence, but the more stuff you try, the better you try to define your own tone and want to experiment. I can't go one day without playing at least an hour and just experimenting.
Hooper drives the boat chief...
#8
Any skilled guitarist can work a squire on a shit box starter kit. There isn't a doubt that great gear can sometimes enhance performance due to ease of use. For example me using a wide necked Estaban acoustic guitar for years until I saved up and got a Martin, which became way easier to play because the neck was slimmer and the fretboard wasnt as rugged.
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#9
I like to do both things.

I find gear and the way gear works to be just as interesting as the mechanics of playing guitar itself. I just see it as another part of the hobby.

Everybody has slightly different motivations for playing guitar. Some people love the gear more than the playing and vice versa. It isn't really your place to judge one motivation as being more dumb than the other.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#10
Kind of both for me really. While I do really try to improve my playing as much as I possibly can when I play, I also enjoy having gear that I can really use. For a very long time I've heard the expression "a good musician should be able to play on any instrument" and over time I have come to disagree with it more and more, which has prompted me to look carefully for instruments I find very comfortable and playable and even easy to maintain. Like I own an MIM Jazz Bass, a Gibson SG and a handmade Telecaster copy, and they're all very comfortable and playable guitars, but I also have an Epiphone PRO1 which is designed as a cheap beginner's guitar and a very cheap old beat up Squier Bullet Stratocaster which with the exception of the Epiphone having string tension issues and the Strat sounding distorted and shitty through a clean channel, they are both guitars I favour playing.
Point is (after realising I'm a slight gear nerd and a lot more proud of my collection than previously realised) that the search for good gear is a search for the ability to make progress easier for me, no unnecessary challenges in the path of playing to the fullest potential.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#11
You're just sad that you're a broke NoMoneyGuitar and you can't afford nice things.

Anyway, music is a hobby for many people. If an adult with disposable income decides that they want to spend their money on a hobby they enjoy even if they aren't good at it, why do you care? Besides, good playing through an amp that sounds like nails on a challenge board will sound like nails on a chalkboard. Also you are forgetting that there is more to music than just notes. I've heard people that don't even play guitar make more compelling music with a multi-fx unit with just a 1/4" cable in the input than I have heard from most of the musicians that I know that wasted spent $50,000 on 4 year bandcamp a music degree. Actually, why don't you ask that? Why do people spend so much money on a guitar degree and then their gear sounds like trash?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#12
Quote by jakesmellspoo
I DON'T NEED ANYONE
DON'T NEED NO MOM AND DAD


DON'T NEED TO LEARN TO PLAY
DON'T NEED NO GEAR THAT SLAYS
I GOT SOME NEWS FOR YOU
DON'T EVEN NEED TO TUNE
I GOT MY MACBOOK MACHINE
GOT MY ELECTRONIC MUSIC DREAM
GOT A COMPUTER
AIN'T NO RIM LOSER
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#13
Skill is essential to actually be able to express yourself.

Good gear is essential to make that expression sound how you envision it. Effects especially if you're playing anything that isn't just a straight, clean tone.
It didn't take long to realise
The safest place was not her arms, but her eyes
Where she can't see you
For her gaze, it blisters;
Grey skin to cinders
#14
Quote by Nelshizzle
Any skilled guitarist can work a squire on a shit box starter kit. There isn't a doubt that great gear can sometimes enhance performance due to ease of use. For example me using a wide necked Estaban acoustic guitar for years until I saved up and got a Martin, which became way easier to play because the neck was slimmer and the fretboard wasnt as rugged.

Yeah plus I think it's great starting on a rough rig that way it'll be easier to play a better one
#15
BigMoneyGuitar I disagree. If you can, why not start on quality gear? How many times has being able to play an old shitbox actually been all that useful? And is it really necessary to make a learning curve that much steeper?
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#16
I was definitely the type of person who bought expensive gear before I was any good. It worked out, and I love all of the gear I've bought, but I'd definitely suggest against doing this. But it's not about this stupid sense of earning it through your skill. 
Quote by Pastafarian96
BigMoneyGuitar I disagree. If you can, why not start on quality gear? How many times has being able to play an old shitbox actually been all that useful? 

There's really only one argument I can think of for this. When you're starting, it's financially prudent to get an idea of what you like first before you start shelling out serious money on gear. 
#17
Quote by BigMoneyGuitar
Yeah plus I think it's great starting on a rough rig that way it'll be easier to play a better one


Yeah. A borderline unplayable and uncomfortable to play guitar because it will help them a couple of years down the line will definitely be motivation for a beginner to stick with the instrument.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#18
Quote by theogonia777
Yeah.  A borderline unplayable and uncomfortable to play guitar because it will help them a couple of years down the line will definitely be motivation for a beginner to stick with the instrument.

You say that like learning on a guitar that can't be intonated because of a misaligned bridge is a bad thing.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#19
chrismendiola 
Quality doesn't necessarily imply expensive. For example, a total beginner has a choice between a relatively cheap starter guitar from a reputable brand and a much cheaper guitar from a virtually unknown brand that unbeknownst to them is what most people would consider a poorly made instrument. Many people would choose the cheaper instrument and many of them would be dissatisfied with the instrument and probably find playing lackluster.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#20
Quote by slapsymcdougal
You say that like learning on a guitar that can't be intonated because of a misaligned bridge is a bad thing.


Especially when it teaches your ears bad intonation and makes your parents want to burn down whatever store it came from.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#21
Quote by theogonia777
Yeah.  A borderline unplayable and uncomfortable to play guitar because it will help them a couple of years down the line will definitely be motivation for a beginner to stick with the instrument.

You seem really bitter. Are you unhappy?
#22
Quote by BigMoneyGuitar
You seem really bitter. Are you unhappy?


I am unhappy to see someone giving bad advice like suggesting that a new player will benefit from playing a bad instrument. Why? Does it make you happy to see someone give bad advice?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#23
why is it an either/or?
will someone carry me across ten thousand miles under the silence
#25
i work to be better at playing than i am

i also save money to buy more gear

both these things make me happy

neither of these things reduce the amount of effort i put into the other

if anything i'm more motivated to play when i have new gear

Quote by BigMoneyGuitar
It doesn't make much sense to me to have amazing gear if you're only going to use it to play a few chords.
all the skill in the world won't make something like a line 6 spider produce a good sound, even if it's still impressive, regardless of how much nonsense you hear about tone being in the fingers

lots of important things are in the fingers (like tendons which are connected to muscles) and there's pretty much fuck all you can do without them but tone is just not in the fingers

a good amp will make cowboy chords sound great

you may notice that famous guitarists typically employ both good playing and good gear, because these things typically combine to produce something pretty great
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Jul 25, 2017,
#26
Quote by K33nbl4d3
a good amp will make cowboy chords sound great


Also for a guy that calls himself BigMoneyGuitar, he seems to be painfully unaware that the majority of people making money from playing guitar are... wait for it... playing just a few chords with good equipment.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#27
I do a combo of both. You can't get the best out of your gear unless you have the skill, but you also can't be your best if your gear is shit. 
I like St. Anger. Ridicule me, daddy

Quote by ErikLensherr

REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
#28
I just use a Macbook and pro-tools.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#29
Quote by theogonia777
I am unhappy to see someone giving bad advice like suggesting that a new player will benefit from playing a bad instrument.  Why?  Does it make you happy to see someone give bad advice?

A Squier for example isn't great, but for a beginner it's perfect. I don't see how that's bad advice.

You're right though. In the future I'll suggest to people that they drop a grand on a their first guitar. Now that's good advice lmao
#30
Quote by BigMoneyGuitar
A Squier for example isn't great, but for a beginner it's perfect. I don't see how that's bad advice.

You're right though. In the future I'll suggest to people that they drop a grand on a their first guitar. Now that's good advice lmao


I would write out a real response, but you're clearly borderline (that means almost) illiterate (that means you can't read), so I won't bother.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#31
Quote by theogonia777
I would write out a real response, but you're clearly borderline  (that means almost) illiterate (that means you can't read), so I won't bother.

I wouldn't worry about it cause apparently you aren't a real player unless you waste money and buy a shitbox with action that's higher than OP and fret-ends sharper than your claws in the pit on a Friday night. 
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#32
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I wouldn't worry about it cause apparently you aren't a real player unless you waste money and buy a shitbox with action that's higher than OP and fret-ends sharper than your claws in the pit on a Friday night. 

Oh, and that only uses rusty barbed wire for strings.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#33
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Oh, and that only uses rusty barbed wire for strings.

Also never cut the ends of your strings at the headstock cause that's where all the TOANZ and MAUJAU is
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#34
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Oh, and that only uses rusty barbed wire for strings.


Well duh. How else are going to build calluses?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#36
Quote by BigMoneyGuitar
A Squier for example isn't great, but for a beginner it's perfect. I don't see how that's bad advice.

You're right though. In the future I'll suggest to people that they drop a grand on a their first guitar. Now that's good advice lmao

brought to you from the guy who does a video pranking a music store. dude while you can certainly do worse than a Squier (at least above the bullet line) that doesn't really make it perfect for a beginner.  no need to be a dick and say "oh i'll suggest a $1000 guitar " either.  
#37
playing is ultimately more important. but having a spaceship pedalboard does not mean you cannot play. some genres use huge boards as part of the instrument, and knowing how to "play" the board is a facet of the music. some genres use a few effects just to give the sound some flavor. some genres use no effects at all.

about the beginner guitar thing: crappy guitars are really discouraging for new players. if they stick with guitar through the discouraging times, they will have fingers strong enough to kill a man and a proper guitar will play like butter and sound amazing. but likely they will not stick with it because, their crappy guitar is discouraging. it sounds bad, it is hard to play, etc. my solution is that every beginner guitarist should have their guitar properly set up, no exceptions.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jul 26, 2017,
#38
Quote by monwobobbo
brought to you from the guy who does a video pranking a music store. dude while you can certainly do worse than a Squier (at least above the bullet line) that doesn't really make it perfect for a beginner.  no need to be a dick and say "oh i'll suggest a $1000 guitar " either.  
If I could've bought a £1000 guitar when I started out I may well have made a questionable choice style-wise but ultimately I think I would have had a more enjoyable first couple years of playing

Also a further thought: to have a major impact gear purchases needn't be big or expensive. My acquisition of a decent capo the other week for a mere £17 has opened up a whole new range of stuff to practice that would've been buzzy and an all-round pain with my old capo. Very little money for a major improvement to my whole experience of playing guitar over the past couple weeks.

A focus on gear isn't essential to playing like a focus on the actual playing is, sure (it's a more valuable skill to the hobby of gear collecting, though...), but nobody outside of My Les Paul forums actually puts gear first. They might in practice if they have a large disposable income but very little free time to practice, but nobody's imagining that the gear is the important bit in making music, regardless of the accusations people like OP may wish to make. But put an interest in gear together with an interest in playing and the overall result is better than either alone.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#39
Quote by K33nbl4d3
If I could've bought a £1000 guitar when I started out I may well have made a questionable choice style-wise but ultimately I think I would have had a more enjoyable first couple years of playing

Also a further thought: to have a major impact gear purchases needn't be big or expensive. My acquisition of a decent capo the other week for a mere £17 has opened up a whole new range of stuff to practice that would've been buzzy and an all-round pain with my old capo. Very little money for a major improvement to my whole experience of playing guitar over the past couple weeks.

A focus on gear isn't essential to playing like a focus on the actual playing is, sure (it's a more valuable skill to the hobby of gear collecting, though...), but nobody outside of My Les Paul forums actually puts gear first. They might in practice if they have a large disposable income but very little free time to practice, but nobody's imagining that the gear is the important bit in making music, regardless of the accusations people like OP may wish to make. But put an interest in gear together with an interest in playing and the overall result is better than either alone.

can't argue that. having the tools to get the job done is always important. of course being able to do the job is always what counts the most.  i don't have high end gear but what i do have is gear that will get the job done and that works for me. having "decent" gear doesn't have to mean expensive. a guy with a MIM Strat, a Peavey Valveking and a couple of Boss pedals can sound great without breaking the bank. there also comes a time when you've put in the hours of practice and need to do something with it. that's usually when the gear starts to become a priority. after 35+ years of playing i may not be the best but i can get by so i look at gear a little more. 
#40
i'll tell you right now that my starter squier was a piece of shit and definitely hampered my playing.

there was a burr on the bridge that kept breaking the g string and i didn't have the money or knowhow at the time to figure out how to fix it.

now, the fender cyclone i bought later on didn't really improve my playing ability at all, so...
mugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmug
Page 1 of 2