#1
Having been playing for 15 years it's well past time I got a tuning pedal!

The 'industry standard' seems to be the Boss TU-3. I've tried it, it works great! It's also 60-70GBP, which seems a lot, given my current (non-pedal) tuner Korg CA-1 costs ~15GBP.

The TU-3 seems expensive, and like it hasn't changed in 20+ years, are there better tuners out there?
My instinct (having been burned by ****ty behringer kit before) is that the super cheap end is not worth it, but surely there are alternatives to the BOSS?

Disclaimer - I'm not averse to splashing some cash on hard-wearing kit, I fully expect this to last 10yr+ and therefore be a bargain at <100GBP but the TU-3 seems excessively overpriced for what it is, given the limited tech in it!


TU-3 65GBP https://www.gak.co.uk/en/boss-tu-3-pedal-tuner/28335 
Korg pitchblack 50GBP https://www.righttrackmusicshop.co.uk/korg-pitchblack-chromatic-tuning-pedal-metalic-green.html
Dr. Green 50GBP https://www.gak.co.uk/en/ashdown-dr-green-tune-up-tuner-pedal/107302
CPT-01 20-25GBP http://www.inta-audio.com/studio-recording-c57/guitar-tuners-metronomes-c512/cpt-01-chromatic-guitar-tuner-pedal-p8460
Berhinger TU-300 GBP 20 https://www.gak.co.uk/en/behringer-tu-300-chromatic-tuner/1024

EDIT:
Requirements (in order):
1. Tunes effectively
2. Foot pedal
3. Hard wearing
4. Chromatic Tuner
5. True Bypass
6. Looks pretty

EDIT2:
There are bunch of tuners on amazon for ~20GBP is there any reason not to think they are fine?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Jul 21, 2017,
#2
My Korg Pitchblack has served me well for many years.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
dannyalcatraz Is there any reason why you wouldn't recommend it?
I'm trying to work out why Boss has such dominance in what should be a saturated industry!
EDIT: even 50 GBP seems steep, given all I want is a box/display added to my inline tuner - that's all of 5 GBP of metal/electronics!
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Jul 21, 2017,
#4
I have no reason not to recommend the Korg.

The Boss is likely the industry standard because it's a capable tuner in its own right, and Boss pedals are available in virtually every major music store in the developed world. If your Boss tuner dies, you can replace it in hours or minutes. The Korg and others may be harder to find.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
As far as I know there are good options there, particularly the Korg and the Boss, but the TC Polytune should definitely be under consideration here. There are currently three generations, with the basic one being a good chromatic tuner with the polyphonic function allowing you to tune to standard and transpositions thereof while playing all the strings at once (I've never used that function to tune, but it's useful to check at a glance which string is out of something's not sounding right). I think there may be a Korg with that feature also. The second (the one I have) has the addition of a strobe tuner, which basically just ups the precision of the tuning, which is the mode I use on a day-to-day basis. The third, which is new, also has what I'm told is a very good buffer (the Bona Fide, which also exists as a separate pedal) built into it. It's also pretty widely available (I got mine off eBay since I was on a budget but I see them in stores all the time). The display is bright and clear, which is obviously useful in performance.

A new TC can be costly but as tuners go, considering there's only really so much you'd ever really feel the need to ask of one, it just shines in pretty much all the important places (the LEDs, for example), so I'd definitely look into that option if the features sound useful to you.

Also, looking back at your list, the first two versions of the Polytune are true bypass, the third has a good buffer which is better if you've got a lot of pedals or cable.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Jul 21, 2017,
#6
I use the pitchblack. I have three of them, and they are all on different boarfs.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#7
I moved to the Polytune mini noir. I traded in a planet waves tuner for more than i sniped it for and the TC was on sale. Works great, small footprint, and you can see it in any light (my main pain that it solved).

THe pitchblack was great for me, and i used it for many years, until the direct sunlight became an issue.

I actually went Korg-> Boss Tu-1000 (the giant stage tuner, you can see it from space)-> Planet waves for a small foot print pedal-> exclusively using the Polytune
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#11
Thanks for the advice guys!

Couple of questions:
- What is a 'buffer'? Why would I want it and what advantage does it have over true bypass? (NB I'm a bass player with 1/2 other pedals)
- What is strobe tuning? Why is it better?

I think I'm leaning towards to PolyTune2 as it's slightly cheaper nowadays and has all the features that (I think) I need.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#12
Quote by doive
Thanks for the advice guys!

Couple of questions:
- What is a 'buffer'? Why would I want it and what advantage does it have over true bypass? (NB I'm a bass player with 1/2 other pedals)
- What is strobe tuning? Why is it better?

I think I'm leaning towards to PolyTune2 as it's slightly cheaper nowadays and has all the features that (I think) I need.

There's a thing called 'tone suck'. 

https://reverb.com/uk/news/demystifying-buffer-pedals-and-avoiding-the-dreaded-tone-suck

Basically everything you need to know about that, and what buffers do to combat it.

Stroboscopic tuning is... just* more sensitive than chromatic. As in, it will show fractions of a cent in pitch, which - IMO - isn't that useful for performance or practice, but if you're doing a setup, then that level of accuracy can be useful.


*Yes, there are technical reasons for it, but I'm just a dumbdumb as far as that's concerned.
#14
Quote by doive
dannyalcatraz Is there any reason why you wouldn't recommend it?
I'm trying to work out why Boss has such dominance in what should be a saturated industry!!


Mostly guitar players are followers, and they buy what everyone else buys. And, too, it's whatever Guitar Center buys a ton of and then tells their salespeople to recommend (higher profit margin?).

I bought a Boss years ago and rarely use it these days.
Honestly, there are a bunch of apps for your iPhone that will work great (and some are free) for tuning your guitar. If you have a multi-FX or modeler, there's almost always a decent tuner included, and you don't have to deal with power supply inputs or extra cable connections.
#15
Quote by doive
dannyalcatraz Is there any reason why you wouldn't recommend it?
I'm trying to work out why Boss has such dominance in what should be a saturated industry!
EDIT: even 50 GBP seems steep, given all I want is a box/display added to my inline tuner - that's all of 5 GBP of metal/electronics!


Boss effects pedals are akin to cockroaches.
#16
I use the Boss TU-3 back home and live on stage and i am very happy with it.
Yes it is a bit more expensive then other tuners but it is absolutely reliable and that's what matters on stage (my thought)
#17
Quote by doive
- What is a 'buffer'? Why would I want it and what advantage does it have over true bypass? (NB I'm a bass player with 1/2 other pedals)
Slapsy addressed this pretty well, but just to elaborate - true bypass has been the fixation of pedal junkies for a long time because in theory there's nothing messing with your signal when the pedal is off. In practice, enough cables, jacks and switches will still take off the high frequencies due to their capacitance. A buffer (short for buffer amplifier) will reproduce the signal with a lower impedance, which I have to say is the bit I don't entirely understand, but the effect is that it is much less vulnerable to losing the high end travelling through all those cables and things. Buffers have a bit of a bad reputation because the bad ones, typically the ones built into low-end pedals, don't properly reproduce the original signal, and may mess with the EQ and such, which entirely defeats the object. That's why "true bypass" is sometimes seen as a bit of a holy grail.

In practice, a good buffer is just as good as true bypass if you don't have much cable or many pedals to worry about, and is better than true bypass if you do. However, if you've only got a couple of pedals and you're not running particularly long stretches of cable, you don't need a buffer in the first place and true bypass is just as good.

Quote by doive
- What is strobe tuning? Why is it better?
For the sake of illustration, a mechanical, analog strobe tuner is one where the input signal from the instrument is amplified to power a lamp, so that it flashes at the exact same frequency as the note produced by the instrument. You then have a translucent disc with a pattern on it spinning in front of that light that should be spinning at the exact frequency that the note should be. If the note is in tune, the disc will appear not to be moving, as the frequency of the lamp matches that of the disc's spinning, in the same way moving wheels sometimes appear static on videos, if they match the framerate of the recording.

Of course, what you have in the Polytune is some clever computer chip inside it with an imaginary disc and an imaginary light, and then some pretty LEDs on the front that show you the important stuff. TC Electronic claim that the precision of the normal chromatic mode is ±0.5 cents, while the strobe mode is ±0.1 cents. In a word, plenty.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#19
Tc polytune in strobe mode. It's the most accurate tuner I've ever used (in a pedal form, that is).
When tuning with 12th fret harmonics you get like 0,01 cent accuracy
#20
I have the TU-3 on my pedalboard and the Polytune goes to every gig.  Both work, I prefer the Polytune even though it is a few more $$.  It is just a great intuitive tuner with bright LEDs that adapt to any lighting condition and it is very easy to read and use.  I could get a clip-on for $15 that works but I would much rather use the Polytune.

I could also get a Squier MiC Strat but I prefer to play an American Standard from Corona.   
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#21
I own a Polyune 3 and a Boss TU-3.

I can categorically say that the Polytune 3 is so much better. Its more accurate, (the strobe mode is accurate to 0.02 cents on the PT3, so TC claims) and 0.5 cents in standard mode. The Boss is accurate to 1 cent. It certainly isn't bad, but its still only half as accurate as the Polytune. This is relevant when using a tuner to measure fine intonation adjustments.

The buffer in it is switchable on the PT3 while on the Boss its on whether you like it or not. The buffers in both of them are really good, the PT's is still better. It has the Bona Fife buffer pedal built directly into it. Which is next level.

The Polytune 3 isnt the cheapest tuner in the world but it does absolutely everything objectively better. The only thing wrong with it is that I don't find the Polytune mode itself very useful.

The Boss is still decent and its very popular, but it doesn't do anything that sets it apart and there are alternatives that simply do the job better these days.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#24
The polytune is great because you can strum all your strings at once and it'll show you which are in tune and which aren't, so you don't have to go one-by-one. A lifesaver in gigs where you may have to tune quickly between songs and don't want to cycle through each string one at a time...