#1
Away from "artist preference" and "put it in and see how it sounds"

Is there a technical difference between neck and bridge pickups ?  has the neck got more output ?  Bridge pickup brighter ?

is there a reason when manufactured that a pickup is designed for a set position ?

can you just Multimeter the output as a guide to the Volume of the pickup ?


the reason i ask is I have a Lace sensor "Bridge pickup" that is very quite and in the neck i have a P-Rails the P-Rails is way louder then the Lace sensor
I was thinking of swapping a Dimarzio Jazz Neck from another guitar with the Lace sensor.   

but if I do this I 'll have 2 neck pickups in the same guitar and could i have the same volume problem ..  that would suck LOL  

any Knowledge, attitude, advice or artist BS welcome =)


 
Last edited by T4D at Jul 23, 2017,
#2
Quote by T4D
Away from "artist preference" and "put it in and see how it sounds"

Is there a technical difference between neck and bridge pickups ?  has the neck got more output ?  Bridge pickup brighter ?

is there a reason when manufactured that a pickup is designed for a set position ?

can you just Multimeter the output as a guide to the Volume of the pickup ?


the reason i ask is I have a Lace sensor "Bridge pickup" that is very quite and in the neck i have a P-Rails the P-Rails is way louder then the Lace sensor
I was thinking of swapping a Dimarzio Jazz Neck from another guitar with the Lace sensor.   

but if I do this I 'll have 2 neck pickups in the same guitar and could i have the same volume problem ..  that would suck LOL  

any Knowledge, attitude, advice or artist BS welcome =)


 


Most guitars had the same pickup in both the neck and bridge position (as in the SAME pickup) until the '80's. For most guitars there was no difference between the bridge and neck pickups, but because the neck pickup is in a position where there's likely to be more "swing" to the string, it's usually louder than the bridge pickup in those guitars.

The most notable exception was the telecaster.

Bill Lawrence designed Gibson's first "hot" pickup in the early '70's for the L6S (which was also Gibson's first 24-fret guitar). By the mid-80's, manufacturers were putting a hotter pickup in the bridge and a less-hot pickup in the neck and claiming that they'd been "balanced" for volume. These days manufacturers build a "balanced set" only because they can sell two pickups that way and because they've convinced guitarists that they need to have a "balanced set."

You can't multimeter the output as a guide to the volume of the pickup because there are more factors than impedance.

I routinely run a hotter pickup in the neck in some of my guitars. For example, one of the guitars I use the most has a relatively hot (9.2 Kohm) '57 in the bridge, but has an 18K DiMarzio Fast Track II (technically designed to be the bridge pickup for a strat) in the neck position on my Les Paul. It's a LOT louder than the '57. The thing is, a difference in volume isn't a problem, nor does it suck.

It's all about how you use your guitar.
#3
Thanks dspellman  that's pretty much what i was thinking   ( tho i did think a multimeter may have told me something useful    

I'll switch the pickups around and see what happens and again Thanks for the post   
#4
Within a given type (eg SD Jazz) of pickup, DCR gives a rough guide to output and tone - lower DCR implies lower output and brighter tone. The lower output pickup is normally used in the neck position, because greater string excursion in that location compared to the bridge will result in greater magnetic effect so less output if need in the neck pickup to balance it with the bridge pickup. The neck location also means more emphasis on the fundamental and lower harmonics, so the note will sound less bright. The brighter tone of the lower-DCR neck pickup compensates for this. In contrast, the somewhat warmer tone and higher output of the bridge pickup compensate for the higher harmonics and lower excursion near the bridge.

You can get a feel for this by checking the DCR and tone specs of neck and bridge versions of the same model pickup on tye Seymour Duncan website, and I assume DMarzio has something similar.

I sometimes use mixed types of pickups, but go for similar tone in neck, middle and bridge, and similar output. Fine tuning of output and bass-treble balance is done by adjusting pickup height and tilt, but the pickups themselves have to be in the right ballpark.
#5
Most of the time the only difference is that the bridge pickup has more turns of wire on it than a neck pickup.  There are two reasons for this.  The 1st is to balance volume between neck and bridge try to give the bridge pickup a little more volume than the neck for more cutting leads.  The 2nd reason is tone shaping.  More turns of wire gives a more compressed sound with more midrange.  That makes the bridge position sound fatter and more powerful.  Fewer turns of wire gives lower, tighter, lows and more presence in the top end.  This gives a neck position a more open tone and helps prevent boominess in the lower midrange.

There are a handful of pickups where the neck version uses a different magnet, wire type, or wire size, than the bridge and this too is about volume and tone shaping but I'm not going to go into details or specifics on this because it isn't as common and it can get overly complicated very quickly.

I frequently recommend using a neck pickup in the bridge or a bridge pickup in the neck particularly when the player isn't using a matched set of pickups anyway.  I also frequently recommend people with matched sets swapping the magnet from the bridge with the magnet from the neck.  1 example of this is the Ibanez V7/V8 pickups.  The alnico magnet in the bridge makes the V8 sound mushy and muddy while the ceramic magnet in the V7 makes it sound thin, weak, and sterile.  Putting the Alnico into the V7 boosts perceived output and midrange and putting the ceramic in the V8 makes it sound tighter and more dynamic.
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