Page 1 of 2
#1
I've been playing guitar for over a year now but I still seem to have trouble playing things that don't seem too difficult eg. I was just trying to learn the intro to welcome to the jungle and I spenT an hour trying to learn just the intro and I got basically nowhere. My friend who has been playing guitar for a few months more than me was playing the end solo to paradise city after playing for a year and now he plays heaps of Metallica solos. I practice for an hour a day and I still seem to be shit
#2
The number of hours that you practice is only one piece of the puzzle. What is a lot more important is the quality of the practicing. That may well be why your friend has the edge on you. Not to mention that while you might be practicing 1hr a day, he might be practicing 1hr 30 minutes a day. That additional 30 minutes adds up to be significant over time.

How are you practicing? Are you just reading tabs or are you actually learning the songs and their structure through a resource that teaches you how the song is structured, and what are the most effective ways to play it? Are you practicing with a metronome? You need to play what you're learning slowly enough that you do not make any mistakes and eventually work yourself up to the song's full tempo. That's the fastest way to learn new material properly.

Don't be discouraged by what your friend is doing. See it as an opportunity to learn. Ask them how they're practicing so you can learn by their example.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#3
Thread was moved to forum: Guitar Techniques
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#4
jasperxbender You have to be your own detective ... are you having mechanical issues (incorrect fretting, or landing on wrong string, ...) or are you having timing issues (early, late, inconsistent)?  Are there certain finger patterns that you keep getting wrong?  Once you have a list of offenders, you can work on puuting them right.  Or is it just you get lost on the guitar, and misremember where to play?  Have a think about this, and come back.
#5
I believe every beginner should have a teacher. Even intermediate and advanced players should have a teacher but for beginners it's a must since you don't have a clue what you need to learn.

For instance, if you're a beginner, you should be learning something like a riff like Day Tripper rather than the intro to Welcome To The Jungle, which is way too hard for a beginner.

Tabs will tell you where you put your fingers, but not whether your hand/fingers are in the right positions, whether you're using the right finger or whether you're playing in time.

Find a teacher - and if your dream is to become great at guitar - be choosy. Don't take the first teacher that comes. Check whether he really intends to help you reach your goals (not his) and whether he has the ability to do it.
#6
Quote by jasperxbender
I've been playing guitar for over a year now but I still seem to have trouble playing things that don't seem too difficult eg. I was just trying to learn the intro to welcome to the jungle and I spenT an hour trying to learn just the intro and I got basically nowhere. My friend who has been playing guitar for a few months more than me was playing the end solo to paradise city after playing for a year and now he plays heaps of Metallica solos. I practice for an hour a day and I still seem to be shit

You're "shit" because you only practice an hour a day, which is not  enough for electric guitar, despite what many here will tell you.  Good players practice at least 2 hours per day, often way more than that, at least for a certain period of time.  The great players out there practiced about  6 to 8 hours per day from a very young age ( usually age 4 - that seems to be the virtuoso generator)..  I started late, around age 14, all my friends had been playing for years, and I surpassed all of them by the time I was 16 because I played 4 hours or more per day ( I really took to it).  When you practcie two or more hours you really get in the zone and that's where the magic happens.  For most good players 1 hour is barely a warm up. John Pettrucci still, to this day, practices like 6 hours before every gig - to put that in perspective. 

Start practicing more and you will see much faster improvements. Spending one hour on a part is not a lot.  I could spend hours and hours on one lick - it takes the time it takes. Sometimes a part could take 20 hours of practice or more.  Don't worry about it, just woodshed until you get it. 

Also, ignore anyone who tells you they don't practice much if they are great players - lies- all lies! You're only as good as the hours you put in.  You can take that quote to the bank!  
Last edited by reverb66 at Jul 28, 2017,
#7
If I am to assume that you are just mainly working on songs the whole time then that might were the problems is.
Flying in a blue dream
#8
Good information here,
I doubt your friend can play them solos cleanly, proberly a big sloppy mess of gain.

The more you practice the better you get simple. But I don't thing a beginner needs to put in 4+ hours of work, maybe after 1 more year of playing but 2 hours is enough for now. I started putting in 10 hours after 3 years of playing.
But you only need to practice crazy hours if you want to play guitar based music (which hate btw)

Check out Pebber Brown daily practice on YouTube. He will get your shit together.
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Jul 28, 2017,
#9
From my perspective, I think all the answers are basically wrong. The best way to see why is to hop over to the more familiar visual world as an example of what is happening...

Let's say you want to learn to paint, you try it for a while and discover that all your paintings don't look like the objects you are representing on the canvass. You go to art school to take lessons and are asked to paint a little still life of a bowl within which lie a banana and an apple.

When you are done the instructor looks at your painting and asks why you painted the banana with different shades of yellow going along its length and why you painted the apple darker on one side with a bright spot on the other side.

You say, because the banana has long flat surfaces that each reflect a little different shade of yellow, and the apple is round so one side will be darker, but on the brighter side there is a highlight because the apple surface is curved.

The instructor says, "No, no, no... you are painting what you think is there and what you think you should see, expecting that the result should match the image of the light coming from the objects. That is completely backwards! You must paint the light, not what you think you see."

You say, what's the difference? He says, you don't paint the banana different shades because you know there are flat surfaces along its length, you paint the colors of what you see, and the painting will suggest that there are flat surfaces. You don't paint one side of the apple darker because you know it is round; you paint the light of what you see and the roundness will be suggested in the painting. You don't paint the highlight because you know that curved surfaces reflect light sources as an apparent highlight... you paint the light of only what you see and the highlight will be suggested in the result.

After a while you learn to undo your whole life's experience of always converting what you see into what you think you are seeing... you learn to see only the light, not the shapes and forms and textures that you have learned to associate with what you see. Then you learn to paint only the light, not the things that you think are the sources of that light.

Back to music... all the above applies. You must learn to hear only what is there in the music and not assume features that are not in the music itself. In music this is more difficult than visual arts because it is not too hard to distinguish a realistic painting from a cartoon. In music, a lot of the popular music is much more like the cartoons in the visual world - schematically constructed to present just the outlines and minimally primitive features from the easiest perspective from which to present them. It is much more difficult to tell the difference between recognizing and distinguishing when music is in cartoon form and music that you are transforming into cartoon form when hearing it.

The bottom line is that you always play exactly the way you hear, which means what you think you hear, which may mean the simplified cartoon version of the music... so you end up thinking that you have trouble playing what you hear, but the trouble is you play exactly the way you hear. You try to fix this by working on your playing rather than working on what really needs development... how you hear music.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#10
An hour a day isn't much. That's gonna hold up your improvement.

And whatever time you do spend needs to include actual work on your skill deficiencies. If you just sit down and play without stopping to work on skills, you'll never get around to addressing whatever it is that hangs you up. 
#11
Quote by cdgraves
An hour a day isn't much. That's gonna hold up your improvement.

And whatever time you do spend needs to include actual work on your skill deficiencies. If you just sit down and play without stopping to work on skills, you'll never get around to addressing whatever it is that hangs you up. 

An hour a day of focused practice, practicing the right things and concentration completely for that whole hour, can achieve a lot. The more the better of course, but quality of practice is as important, if not more, than quantity.

Better spend half an hour or quality focused practice than two hours noodling around aimlessly on the guitar.
#12
You don't need to practice "n" hours a day to not be "shit". But if you want to get really good, then you need to practice a lot.

One hour a day should be enough not to be shit at playing your instrument. It has more to do with how you spend your time than how much time you spend. Especially if you don't know what you are doing, there may not even be much difference between practicing for an hour vs practicing for two hours.

Also, remember that there is a difference between "playing" and "practicing". And there is definitely a difference between playing the guitar for an hour and practicing for an hour.

Also, you have only been playing for a year (that's basically nothing). Most guitarists still sound pretty bad after a year. So don't really worry about it. Getting good takes time. It's not something that happens in a year. I wouldn't suggest comparing yourself to other people, because that's most likely just going to make you feel depressed about your own skills, or you may develop an ego. Remember that it's not a competition.

I was just trying to learn the intro to welcome to the jungle and I spenT an hour trying to learn just the intro and I got basically nowhere.

The intro of "Welcome to the Jungle" is trickier than it sounds because it involves some string skipping and you also need to have a good muting technique. My question is, how are you practicing it? Are you just playing it over and over again in the original tempo or what? Because if you are, that's not going to help, regardless of whether you do it for an hour or ten hours (actually, doing it wrong for a long time will just make you learn it incorrectly, and that's not a good thing - it's much easier to learn to do new things than to get rid of bad habits). You need to find which parts of the riff are the tricky parts. So slow it down and find those parts. When you have found what exactly causes the problem, then you know exactly what you need to focus on when you practice. Remember to start slowly, and only increase speed when you can play it properly in a slower tempo. Also, don't expect huge improvements in one day.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
PlusPaul 

This made me think that listening in order to learn has to be very focussed. I dissect tunes into tiny pieces using a sound editor (Cool Edit Pro, Audacity is similar and free), with loops and slowing down. For example, I'm currently learning a tricky (for me) fingerpicking piece, and there is one very fast chordal pull-off that only seems possible in one particular chord voicing. I had to listen very carefully to get both the notes being played and the way to do it.
#14
I know where you're coming from.

I've been playing the guitar for 19 years, and I still consider myself terrible.

My advice is to have fun, and not take too hard on yourself.

You need to know what are your strenghts and weeknesses, and work them. What holds you from playing Welcome to the Jungle intro? 

If you don't work the specific points that need to be improved, it is not like you'll wake up one day blessed by the gift of guitar wisdom, and rip any song instantly.

Isolate the parts that are hard for you, and practice them slow, but correct. If it is a technique issue, play exercises, focus on what needs attention.

The more time you can practice, the better. But if you only have 1 hour a day, make of this hour the best you can.

If you think that 1 hour is little time, it is better than 45 minutes. Which is better than not playing at all. Don't hold to the time issue. Practice as much as you can, while having fun. If it is getting frustrating, or you're getting mad/angry, give it some time. Go out, visit a friend, watch a movie or something. Return when you're better.

Just remember: Recognize the points that need improvement. Practice with focus. Have fun.

If you have doubts on how you should practice, the internet has loads of tips, and you can also ask here.

All best!
#15
There's ups and downs when learning the guitar. You just happen to be on a downswing right now. Everyone has them. Practice other songs you like and come back to it in a few weeks/months time and you'll be much better at it.
Good luck!
#16
Quote by MaggaraMarine

(a) One hour a day should be enough not to be shit at playing your instrument. It has more to do with how you spend your time than how much time you spend. Especially if you don't know what you are doing, there may not even be much difference between practicing for an hour vs practicing for two hours.

(b) Also, remember that there is a difference between "playing" and "practicing". And there is definitely a difference between playing the guitar for an hour and practicing for an hour.

(c) The intro of "Welcome to the Jungle" is trickier than it sounds because it involves some string skipping and you also need to have a good muting technique.


(a) Easily enough to get decent, at least.

Plus you need to watch when people say they practice a lot- often they're full of it, or spent most of it looking out the window, etc.. I seem to remember coming across an academic paper which said that when they actually had independent evidence of how much people practised (rather than just taking their word for it), suddenly how much they practised was a lot less relevant to how good people were (i.e. people are very unreliable witnesses to how much they practice).

(b) Yeah. Playing makes you sound more musical.

(c) That's what I was thinking. It's not what I'd call "easy", at all.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#17
How much time you practice is mainly a factor in setting your own goals and expectations. It's not like you're destined to suck if you have only an hour a day, but you should be realistic about how quickly you expect to improve and focus on stuff you can actually accomplish in that amount of time.
#18
Chop your friends fingers off while they sleep.

Nothing to be jealous of then.
Legend.
#19
It might be the guitar you own. My first guitar was  Fender Squier Strat. The tone on that thing was horrid. But then when I got a real Stratocaster, it was so much better and the tone and pickups were great. Sometimes more expensive does mean better.
#20
Focused practice is better than aimless practice.

However , aimlesss practice is 1000 times better than not doing anything at all !

There is no such thing as wasted practice time in my opinion.
#21
jasperxbender
You're over thinking it. You probably don't trust your self to move on and come back to things later and basically trust your brain to work things out in its own time and way while you absorb more and more information.

Don't give up and trust in your own ability. You are no less than anyone else. Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses.
#22
jasperxbender When i was in school (music conservatory) my teacher who was a great person and an awesome guitarist gave me many good tips, one that really changed my music life is this… If you study it wrong and if you play it wrong then all you will teach your self is how to play wrong.. What i mean? if it is a year that you are playing and you are not making any improve in your playing probably is not that you don’t have any skills is just that you are playing things wrong, bad movements, bad coordinations put all together and all you are doing is learning how to make mistakes.

I have studends who struggled with coordinations and in a couple of weeks they improve a lot, i am not a magician i’m just very picky when my students wants to really learn things.

Take your time, 1 hour to study is not a lot but is a start and if you are focus and do things right is enough to start make lots of improvements. It’s all about coordinations and brain independence, before to run you have to learn how to walk, i just uploaded a long tutorial about alternate picking and hand coordinations, is not really for beginners but a couple of exercise are even for everybody.

Try this one… i just joined and i don’t know how to make tab, i make one example here that you can understand.

Ok, let’s say 1234 exercises, do u know it? instead of playing 1234 on all the strings in alternate picking at 4 notes per beat, do it on 2 strings and even better at 2 note per beat and play 1234 on one string and then 1 on the next. Then stop, take one or 2 beat to rest and repeat. When you are familiar with the fingering start to play at 4 notes per beat and MARK the accent who is always on the 1

Are you following me?

Then add only one more string so for EX 1234 on the 3rd then 1234 on the 2nd and then 1 on the first, take as many beat you need to relax, DO NOT NEED TO RUN now, that is steep 2 when you will alternate tension to relax, when you are able to do this you are ready to teach your brain to start to run a little.

Then step 2, go back to that 1234 and 1 pattern, so 1234 on 1 string and then another accent on 1 on the next BUT now you try to double the tempo, what i mean? if you was playing for example at 60bpm with 4 notes per beat now you will do a run and will play one time doubling the tempo like you are playing at 120bpm, so start the metronome at 120bpm and will have to play a few times at 2 notes per beat right?, when you are relaxed try one time at 4 notes per beat and then one or few beat to rest and repeat. 

I’m pretty sure with a little bit of work you can do this in a week! what will happen in your brain after practing this exercise?
Your brain will start to process that he knows how to play at 120bpm and with a little bit of more time it will become a natural thing!

The secret is to play relaxed even when you are playing fast (hard to explain in a post it will take a lot but if i find people interested i could do it) find the right tempo, i should see your limit to tell you on what bpm start but all you have to do is to be honest with your self, what is my limit at 4 note per beat? example 100bpm? cut 10 or 20 bpm and don’t move from that speed for a few days then start to make your speed burst play the slow pattern at  100 bpm and you will see that your new limit not 100 but 110. If your left is ok and you do this i 100% GUARANTEE that this work. Then obviously playing at 200 or more bpm takes a lot of time but that is not running that is formula 1.
#24
You can definitely get better after taking a break, and it seems like magic.

However, for this to work, you need to be sure that you have been putting in the work. You can't half ass 30 mins a day practice then take a two week break and expect to ever be anything other than shit.

Also, I wouldn't listen too closely to people who tell you an hour a day focused practice is enough. An hour a day focused practice is probably bare minimum of what it takes to get pretty good at guitar. On weekends, I'll sometimes practice 8-10 hours a day or more, fairly intensely at that. There are diminishing returns with practicing, and the amount needed to get better increases with skill level. As a beginner, an hour a day IS probably plenty to get the basics down relatively quickly. If you're trying to learn a Guthrie Govan song however, an hour a day is next to useless unless you are already a guitar god.

Practice doesn't make perfect, but perfect practice definitely makes pretty damn good.
Last edited by jlowe22 at Aug 14, 2017,
#25
jlowe22 I quote every single word you said less than practice 8-10 hour a day or more. I was used to study like that but you have to achieve that amount of hours progressively and for progressively i mean in months. 

Then stay always on alert because even if you don't feel it you can ruin your muscles or tendons. That happened to me just before my 5 years exam in school and had to postpone it, you can't pass from 4/5 hours per day to 8/10 (on a classical but i already even played electric). 

Plus, is very hard to stay focused for 8 hours and remain focus is what makes the difference. Better 2 or 3 hours completely focus than 8 watching movies or without thinking at what you are doing.
#26
Quote by Iconte
jlowe22 I quote every single word you said less than practice 8-10 hour a day or more. I was used to study like that but you have to achieve that amount of hours progressively and for progressively i mean in months. 

Then stay always on alert because even if you don't feel it you can ruin your muscles or tendons. That happened to me just before my 5 years exam in school and had to postpone it, you can't pass from 4/5 hours per day to 8/10 (on a classical but i already even played electric). 

Plus, is very hard to stay focused for 8 hours and remain focus is what makes the difference. Better 2 or 3 hours completely focus than 8 watching movies or without thinking at what you are doing.


Yea, you're right, you can't jump up like that immediately. And I don't practice like that every day. And when I do, the majority of that time is spent ear training and working on improv or picking out songs by ear, tasks which are relatively easy on the hands. However, you do want to get to a point where you can play at a fairly intense level for multiple hours at a time.

I don't recommend playing to the point of injury, but my point is that I would not be satisfied with one hour a day practice in the long term, and I'm willing to bet every guitar virtuoso has practiced an average of considerably more than that.
#27
jasperxbender forget all this how much you should practice just trust younself to learn. Creativity doesn't have a time. You could practice 8 hours a day for 20 years and be nothing but a robot at the end because creativity doesn't come from practice it comes from inside you, it comes through you as you grow through life!
#29
This is the exercise i was talking you about.. give it a try for a week like 20 minutes each day and see what happen to your hands.
#30
Quote by blueguitar990
jasperxbender forget all this how much you should practice just trust younself to learn. Creativity doesn't have a time. You could practice 8 hours a day for 20 years and be nothing but a robot at the end because creativity doesn't come from practice it comes from inside you, it comes through you as you grow through life!
blueguitar990

What you're saying has some truth to it, but you definitely improve your ear, your improv skills, and your ability to produce on guitar what you hear in your head through practice. There is no doubt about that. Maybe Mozart or Guthrie were born with these skills, but the rest of us have to practice if we ever hope to develop them. But yes, everyone needs different amounts of practice to achieve a certain goal, but the average person is gonna need a lot of it if they ever hope to get really good.
#31
jlowe22 nah, even guys like Guthrie have put in untold hours of practice.

By way of some example: to hear Guthrie tell it, the first time he picked up a guitar (as much as possible anyway) he was three years old.  He's fully willing to admit that at that age he wouldn't have really been 'playing' so much, but that's the scale of time we're working with when it comes to his skill.  He's guitars around and in his hands since before most people learn to read, so for him it really is part of his expression and communication with the world around him.

I guess that's a bit beside the point, what I'm getting at is that everyone practiced to get where they are.  Even if Guthrie only played an average of 4 hours a day (which I suspect is actually an underestimate) from the age of 3, that's around 61,000 hours of practice.  Bears thinking about.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#32
Zaphod_Beeblebr

I think 1 hour a day is plenty to get really good at guitar I think the trick is to keep challenging yourself and not stick to trying to master one thing before moving on and instead keep coming back round to it.
To trust your own rhythm and improvisation to improve by its self which it will if you know how but to teach how in words is futile because it comes from somewhere inside so it's like trying to explain colour to the blind you just have to work it out yourself.
Last edited by blueguitar990 at Aug 15, 2017,
#33
Zaphod_Beeblebr

Yea he no doubt practiced an insane amount of hours. But he was also playing Elvis songs by the time he made it to first grade and that's really rare. Most 6 year olds have nowhere near the attention span to learn stuff like that at that age. He quite probably was born with something, whatever that something was, that helped him learn the guitar.
#34
Has your guitar ever gotten a proper set-up? A bad set-up can sabotage decent playing with buzzing, dead notes and innotation problems.
#35
I highly recommend everyone check out Brainjo

It is about the banjo, but really it applies to any instrument (or anything you want to learn tbh). The guy is a neurologist so he explains the best way to practice that will have the greatest effect. Basically spend no more than 20min per task/technique. Beyond that there are severely diminishing returns. The brain needs rest, and preferably sleep between practice sessions. So 1hr of practicing scales is going to be slow progress because 40min of that isn't helping much. But 20min of scales, 20min of ear training, 20min of hammer ons, 20min of pull offs, and 20min of learning a song, for example, will yield much better results. I suggest a timer and a practice plan.

He also talks about how even imagining yourself playing improves your skills. This has been shown to be true. I recently actually saw a study where one group of basketball players were asked to physically practice a tricky shot, the other group were asked to only mentally practice. The result was that they improved by the same measure!
#36
gweddle.nz 

I think what the neurologist is saying is great advice for efficiency, as far as time spent practicing vs skill level.  But as you get better, diminishing returns start setting in, there's no real way around it, and 20 minutes isn't much at all.  It takes longer than that for a lot of players to get warmed up.  Twenty minutes is decent for running some line and burning it into muscle memory, but ear training?  I'm not sure I would have ever developed a decent ear if I had only practiced it 20 minutes at a time.
#37
jlowe22 There is nothing to say you can't do 3 or 4 20min sessions in a day. And warming up is different to learning new skills - it's just the process of warming up the muscles. I'm not a neurologist, so I can only trust what he is saying to be true (and from what I've researched it seems to be the case). Some of the more famous YouTube teachers also recommend ~20min per exercise (Music is Win, Samurai Guitarist, etc...).

I'm pretty confident you would have progressed as quickly if you had done 20min at a time with 2hr+ breaks between. But we'll never know obviously
Last edited by gweddle.nz at Aug 16, 2017,
#38
Quote by gweddle.nz
jlowe22 There is nothing to say you can't do 3 or 4 20min sessions in a day. And warming up is different to learning new skills - it's just the process of warming up the muscles. I'm not a neurologist, so I can only trust what he is saying to be true (and from what I've researched it seems to be the case). Some of the more famous YouTube teachers also recommend ~20min per exercise (Music is Win, Samurai Guitarist, etc...).

I'm pretty confident you would have progressed as quickly if you had done 20min at a time with 2hr+ breaks between. But we'll never know obviously


I'm certainly no neurologist, but twenty minutes is basically two- three songs(or 2/3rds of mountain jam at Fillmore) I can't really imagine an improv session being that short, and I wouldn't call it a practice if it was.
#39
jlowe22 I agree it seems counter-intuitive. But it is what the science shows. The brain is a pretty powerful tool when used efficiently. You are welcome to practice for as long as you want. I just wanted to put it out there for people to read.
#40
Quote by gweddle.nz
jlowe22 I agree it seems counter-intuitive. But it is what the science shows. The brain is a pretty powerful tool when used efficiently. You are welcome to practice for as long as you want. I just wanted to put it out there for people to read.

Wait a minute.  Lets not make the jump from "Neurologist says"  to " Science shows".  I'll need to see some peer reviewed research papers for that.  And even then, the brain is highly complex and different for different individuals.  As far as I am aware, The brainjo guy is also selling a program.  We can't take anyone seriously who is advertising a product.

I have no credentials, but I'm also not selling anything.  I'd bet lots of money that virtuoso guitarists everywhere have practiced an average of far more than an hour a day, twenty minutes at a time.  People love to hear that it may take little time to get good at something.  Also, diminishing returns are still returns.  Those extra 3 hours of practice may mean the difference between playing the note sloppily, and playing it well.  
Page 1 of 2