#1
This is what I learned so far;

1. the parts of a guitar

2. the major and minor chords

3. the guitar chord chart

4. the notes on the guitar

I can play a few songs note by note, my question is, how do you add bass to those notes to play it smoothly(or to play it like "jwcfree" from youtube, haha)?

And about guitar tunings, a standard tuning is E A D G B E while a drop D tuning is D A D G B E, my question is,
is there another guitar chord chart for a drop D tuning or the guitar chord chart is the same?

I have no background in music theory, I've just bought a new guitar really. That's all thank you!
Last edited by mardenmnlgd at Jul 30, 2017,
#2
As drop D tuning chages the pitch of the open low E, it changes the pitch of every not along that string. Some open chords that have the 6th string muted can be played the same but chords on the 6th string will be off by 2 semitones. Learn chord construction and you can find the correct notes to create your own.

As far as the bass, you can try a different amp/pedal/pickup or play with your eq, try raising the bass side of your pickup.
#4
Deleted duplicate post, It's late, sorry.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 29, 2017,
#5
Quote by mardenmnlgd
I can play a few songs note by note, my question is, how do you add bass to those notes to play it smoothly(or to play it like "jwcfree" from youtube, haha)?
Not exactly sure what you're asking here. Do you want to add more bass to the note you're playing? If that's the case, wait until you amp up the guitar, and use what is known as an "octave synthesizer pedal to ad an octave below the note you're playing. Of course you could always raise the bottom end content by tone or EQ controls, but doing it that way, can get pretty muddy sounding..

Now, if you talking about picking out bass notes separate from the melody you're playing, that requires tons and tons of practice in (1st choice) finger picking skills, or, (2nd choice) cross picking. There is also a technique called "Travis picking", which involves picking a bass, (or alternating bass notes), with your thumb, while you pick partial chords with your fingers. That's mostly used in accompaniment to one's singing singing. Chet Atkins used to do something like pick the bass while also playing a melody, but trust me, you're getting way, way, ahead of yourself, if you're talking about something like that.

Quote by mardenmnlgd
And about guitar tunings, a standard tuning is E A D G B E while a drop D tuning is D A D G B E, my question is,
is there another guitar chord chart for a drop D tuning or the guitar chord chart is the same?
Reasonably speaking, if you drop the pitch of one string a whole tone, how could the fingering patterns possibly remain the same?

"Drop D tuning", is a technique used to reinforce the D major open chord. It's far, far, far away from practical for uses other than that. It adds a lower root note to the chord, "D2" (The E-6 string's pitch tuned to standard, is "E2"). Unless you're either going to play in D major, or use the 6th string as a drone, drop D can be somewhat impractical.

There is another approach to "Drop D", which is to use a capo at the 2nd fret, which only covers the top 5 strings. At standard E-e tuning what you actually get is "drop E", but tuning the guitar down one full tone to D-d gives you this form of drop D.. In this iteration, all the chord shapes which use fingers on the 6th string remain the same. Primarily, G major remains the same. You do however have to avoid that 6th string with chord shapes which don't put a finger on it. I use that for an acoustic version of Badfinger's "Baby Blue", which you've likely never heard of.
Quote by mardenmnlgd
That's all thank you!
You're quite welcome with a small reservation.

I try to helpfully answer questions to the best of my ability. However, I'm not into editing out all kinds of "size" tags, which the software inserts, when the poster wants to diddle with the text size. You'll get the same answers posting in the standard forum size, and my glasses prescription is working quite well, thank you very much.

If that sounds too harsh, when, (or if), you get further into replying which involves splitting up posts to answer questions on a point by point basis, you'll quickly figure out where I'm coming from with this.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 29, 2017,
#6
Captaincranky  Thanks for posting a reply, much appreciated. Learned something there. You said, "pick the bass while also playing a melody" is this what they called fingerstyle? That's what I want to learn.
#7
mardenmnlgd Here's a tutorial of the Fleetwood Mac song "Rhiannor". Lindsey Buckingham is one of just a few full rock and roll finger style guitarists. The teacher is a trifle bizarre at times, but the camera is pulled back far enough so that you can see him use his thumb to add the bass to the song.



Mark Knopfler is another famous guitarist who uses almost exclusive finger picking. Here's the also famous Justin" of "Justin Guitar" demonstrating Mark's guitar style. (You'll have to wrap your head around the "open G" tuning of the guitar, and the capo on 3 to take full advantage of this video)



Here's the Wiki page on open G tuning: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_G_tuning
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 29, 2017,
#8
I can play a few songs note by note, my question is, how do you add bass to those notes to play it smoothly(or to play it like "jwcfree" from youtube, haha)?

I checked out the channel and he's basically playing the melody and the chords at the same time. How can you do this? Well, obviously first you need to know the melody and the chords. Most of the time the melody is going to be the highest note of the chord, so you just need to find chord voicings where the melody note is the highest note. At first it may be easiest to just play the melody and the lowest note of the chord, though (those are the two most important notes).

So for example if you want to play Twinkle Twinkle Little Star...

Chords: C   C/E F   C/E Dm7 G7/B C Am F6 G7 C
Melody: C C G G A A G   F   F    E E  D  D  C

Here is what you may want to start with:

Melody: C C G G A A G F F E E D D C
Bass:   C   E   F   E D B C A F G C

E:-----3-3-5-5-3---1-1-0-0-------
B:-1-1---------------------3-3-1-
G:-------------------------------
D:-----2---3---2---0-------------
A:-3-----------------2-3-0-----3-
E:-------------------------1-3---

And once you can play this, you may want to add some other chord tones and maybe some kind of an accompanying rhythm (instead of playing everything in quarter notes, maybe arpeggiate the chords and stuff like that).

Also, feel free to change the chords, but the original chords are always a good starting point. But for example if the chords are changing too fast, it may make sense to simplify the chord progression. For example you could play Twinkle Twinkle Little Start with only three different chords: C, F and G. Most melodies can be harmonized with just the I, IV and V chords (C, F and G in the key of C major), so if you want to learn to harmonize melodies that you have learned to play, those three chords are a good starting point. You just need to find the key the melody is in and then use the I, IV and V chords of that key. This will work most of the time.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
@Captaincranky I've watched both videos and I kinda like the song, will try to learn to play those songs. I'm just annoyed by the man with an upside down head with the shades. Thanks for letting me know about it.
Last edited by mardenmnlgd at Jul 31, 2017,
#11
Quote by mardenmnlgd
I've watched both videos and I kinda like the song, will try to learn to play those songs. I'm just annoyed by the man with an upside down head with the shades. Thanks for letting me know about it.
I think I posted those videos, and BTW, did give you fair warning about the instructor being "bizarre" from time to time. He does however, do a good job of explaining the very popular "Rhiannon".

As I said earlier, the songs, in those videos are tentatively way beyond you abilities, at least for the time being.

"Rhiannon" can be sourced multiple times at YouTube, by all means if you believe another instructor can help you more, and isn't as annoying, go for that. I picked that version, because it's very clear how he's doing exactly what needs to be done..

When all is said and done however, if finger style guitar is what you'd like to learn, by all means, go with it from the very beginning. That's (IMHO), at lot easier than playing for years with a pick, suddenly deciding you want to play with your fingers, then finding out you suck at it, because you've played for the last decade or so, with a pick. (And trust me, you absolutely would suck by comparison, if you played with a pick for years and years).. It's kind of like learning to play all over again..and it can be quite frustrating.

EDIT: There's another style of playing and it's called "hybrid picking". That where you hold the pick the way you normally would, but you use the 2nd a 3rd fingers, to pick little arpeggios and fills, or even what amounts to three finger chords.

Still, let's not get too far ahead of ourselves... OK?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 30, 2017,