#1
Hey guys, so I recently bought myself an Ibanez RG421EX and I was thinking of tuning it to Drop C so I can play a wider variety of songs. The thing is I am a newbie and I want to know whether I can tune it down myself or due to string slack I should have it set-up by a guitar shop. As far as I know the sure thing is I should use heavier gauge strings, 11s most likely to compensate for the lack of tension. Any insight is highly appreciated.
Thanks in advance
Last edited by LiverG at Jul 30, 2017,
#2
Honestly, I'd learn how to do the setup yourself. The tools aren't that expensive. It's better to be able to setup a guitar yourself because you can run it with your preferences and don't have to wait for a luthier to do it for you. Some folks recommend having someone do it for you initially, and it could cost you up to $50 US, depending on factors. You will change strings, you probably will want to experiment, so why not learn? 

Secondly, strings are subjective, so don't think you need to use 11-gauge sets. I'm personally fine with 10-46, maybe 11-49 for Drop C, but I did experiment. I know people with Floyd Rose bridges like to use heavier gauges, like 11-56, but again, experimenting is kinda required.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#3
bjgrifter I see, I was thinking the same to be honest. So, what are the chances of me screwing it up badly? I guess I can always have an expert bring her back to life if things go very south, right?
#4
If you pay attention to guides, l8ke the ones here and look at some youtube videos, it's not hard. You may need some tools if you dont have them already. For just adjusting the bridge on your particular guitar, you need a philips screwdriver and an allen wrench--which are usually sold in sets. Restringing can be tricky at first, but youll get it. A string winder is nice, and you also want wire cutters.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#5
I regularly play in Drop C and I would not recommend going lighter on the low E string than a 49. Personally, I run 10-52 on the guitar I have set up for Drop C/C# area which is pretty standard. Look up how to adjust the guitar yourself especially if you have the time to do so and patience. It's great knowledge to have regardless and will save $$ over time.
#6
Again, I came to the 10-46 with testing as my baseline for Drop C. Intonation is easier with a thicker string on the low C.

Also, if you don't have one, a tuner is a good idea.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#7
LiverG You are going to need 10-52 or 11-52 for drop C.  Anything less than 52 on the low E is going to be floppy-city.  Keep in mind that your RG model is [factory] setup with 10-46 strings and the slots in the nut are cut accordingly to achieve the factory string height (action) on frets 1-3 so you may need to slightly widen the nut slots to accommodate fatter strings. Lastly, you may need to adjust the intonation (easy to do on that bridge).
#8
I see, thank you all for your help. I have restringed my guitar many times before but just never had to meddle with the nuts, bridge or truss rod. I'll give it a shot this Monday most likely, it'll depend on whether I will have the tools ready or not. I'll comment here again to let you know how it goes :d
Last edited by LiverG at Aug 3, 2017,
#9
I'd say give it a try. For drop C I use 11-50, but instead of the 50s I get individual 56s. In my experience, when changing tunings and gauges it takes for a while for the guitar to settle into it's new situation. And I mean a couple of string changes later. So if you're struggling with fret buzz it may take a while. Also something that rarely is talked about in setup guides is the nut, make sure that when you install the thicker strings, they aren't sitting up high, in which case you'll have to have an expert work on the slots.