#1
Hi guys.

I left my electric guitar at home for 25 days while at my apartment. I'd sweated on it a lot, left it in a gig bag.

Came back, there's a tiny amount of rust on a couple of the pickup screws, around the toggle switch, and the last fret.

But I tuned it and played it for a good hour and it sounds still as good as ever - even better actually, although that might be my rose tinted ears after our long separation and because I was playing better, having had to discipline myself with just an acoustic at the apartment (I can't go even a single day without playing guitar you see.)

My question is, as long as my baby plays well, do I have to worry about the tiny amounts of rust?
I do intend to clean it well when I change the strings. Any tips for then?

Here are pictures: http://imgur.com/a/bXYiK

Thanks
#2
Yes you should worry. Your guitar is being attacked by your sweat and eventually it will eat into the wood and lead to it rotting.

Seriously.


no honestly


the guitar is absolutely fine. You can remove the corrosion off the frets with 4000 grit sandpaper. You can also use #0000 steel wool but you will need to tape the pickups and the fingerboard off if you do as the slivers of steel that come off it can get clogged in the rosewood pores, and it is known to damage pickups. The fine sandpaper is perfectly good to use tho.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#3
As far as I know rust effects metal only ,  you need to stop the rust now!  for the pickup screws take them out replace them or find a chemical to kill the rust and some steal wool might help,   ,   regarding frets  I would be carful not to get any chemicals on your fret board  use tape over the frets to cover the wood  and use some steal wool on the rusty frets , just make sure you keep the steal wool away from you pickups in fact tape something over them to cover them .
#4
Dry rot in the wood comes to mind.  Along with cockroaches and termites, and a potential carpenter ant problem.  Seriously though, I wouldnt worry about it.
#5
Phosphoric acid (shower/bathroom cleaners) will go after the rust. Don't put any of that stuff on your guitar, of course; remove any metal bits that you're going to treat. You can also dump parts into coke (a cola), which has phosphoric acid as part of the ingredient mix).

Replace as necessary.

Don't put your guitar away with sweat on it. You now know *part* of the reason why you don't. If you have open pickup coils, you may find out that sweat in pickup coils is generally a bad idea as well.
#6
Quote by dspellman

Don't put your guitar away with sweat on it. You now know *part* of the reason why you don't. If you have open pickup coils, you may find out that sweat in pickup coils is generally a bad idea as well.

dspellman makes a good point about always wiping down your guitar after you're done playing it, dont undermine this.  It will make your strings last a little longer too.  I also wash my hands before playing as well, 
#7
I wouldn't worry about it.. Guitars look way better when the paints starts to wear and you get some rust on the hardware.. Take a look at all the guitars from the 50's that sell for $30, 000.. And the wood is not going to rot unless it is always wet
#8
Quote by babysmasher
I wouldn't worry about it.. Guitars look way better when the paints starts to wear and you get some rust on the hardware.. Take a look at all the guitars from the 50's that sell for $30, 000.. And the wood is not going to rot unless it is always wet


Most of the guitars from the '50's that sell for $30K are in great shape, actually.

Here s one reason why you don't want sweat in your open-coil pickups. The sweat finds its way into micro-holes in the coil wire's insulation, starts copper corrosion. Copper, when it corrodes, produces crystals that have really sharp needle-like structures, and those push through the coil wire's insulation themselves. Those crystals can push through to adjoining wires causing microshorts that eventually render the pickup useless.

Plated bridge and tailpieces suffer from sweat corrosion, too. All of them have tiny pits in the plating, and sweat can work its way into those, starting corrosion in the copper and nickel layers beneath. Those eventually expand from crystal production and flake off the chrome, nickel or gold plating.

Nitrocellulose finishes don't particularly care for sweat -- it will often soften and/or cloud the finish making the finish sticky to play on and allowing the nitrocellulose to pick up and incorporate "hairs" from the case interiors as part of the finish.

Some folks think that "Guitars look way better when the paints starts to wear and you get some rust on the hardware." Truth is, most vintage guitar buyers aren't looking for those guitars. Also worth noting that even when guitars are "reliced" at the factory, the parts that look worn (finish) usually have matte finish over them, and the "rusted" bits have been stabilized and/or cleared over. People that pay extra for a guitar with that cosmetic treatment usually also want the guitar to be absolutely perfectly functioning. And they don't want someone's sticky DNA all over the guitar, either.

There's an analogue in the automotive market -- folks who like the "look" of a found derelict car, but who want much more. These cars have brand new chassis, engines, interiors, glass, etc., as well as a ton of modern hidden features. Rust and fading paint have been stabilized and clearcoated; these cars are worth hundreds of thousands of dollars when completed, and no one really wants to put his hand through a fender...