#1
I just replaced them last night same exact kind  of string it came with ( .012 gauge) the strings are colored differently maybe its just a different finish Idk but anyways like the title indicates all the strings buzz and all except the D string are very minor i dont think it has anything to do with the frets as none of them are shorter or taller and none touch strings i also dont think its backbow as my guitar has the small space there any help?
#3
There are a couple of possible issues.

First, are you tuned up to concert pitch?

Second, the new string set may have less tension natively than the old ones. (this assumes you possibly switched brands, alloys, or gauge).

Third and most likely. This presents sometimes on a guitar which is well set up, with low action. New strings will generally require a bit less tension to bring them up to pitch when they are brand spanking new, causing buzzing until they break in. I have experienced this, and it does go away in a few days.

On the route Tony is on, sometimes when you take all the strings off at once, the body relaxes, lowering the action, causing the buzz. This too, will likely pass.

A combination of any or all the items above could conspire to cause buzz, along with a sizable drop in relative humidity, which drops the top, which lowers the strings, which causes the buzz.

If it were me, I'd stretch the new strings out some, re-tune, and just be patient for a few days. The issue will likely go away.. If it doesn't, we'll investigate further in a few days.
#7
Quote by girplayz.mc
Captaincranky Cool! ill let you guys know what happens but like i mentioned is there a reason the D string is louder in terms of the buzzing than the rest 
Well, perhaps because that string requires slightly less tension to bring up to pitch than the other 5. Less tension equals higher excursion, which in turn equals string hitting fret, which then equals buzz.

Or, the D-4 nut slot is slightly too deep, which when combined with the foregoing factors, can equal buzz as well.

All of this, of course, presupposes that you didn't do anything really stupid, like leave the saddle out when you put the new strings on. (I had to say/ask that.Believe it or not, it HAS happened).

I just ground the saddle down on one of my 12 strings, I swore I took the correct amount off the saddle. Yet when I started to put the guitar back together, with just a couple of pairs of strings on, I only had, at most, about .050 clearance at the 12 fret. OH SHIT, said I to myself, I really hosed this saddle!

Having not the common sense to drop what I was doing and start a thread here at UG, or rush out to buy a new saddle. I somewhat stupidly plodded on and installed the rest of the strings. Then, I tuned the guitar up to pitch, and whaddya know, all of a sudden I had about maybe .080 clearance on the E-6 pair, and the guitar plays superbly. Just dumb beginner's luck I guess. .

Now, if someone hadn't changed their strings in quite a while, the strings on the guitar would require tons of tension to bring them up to pitch, and of course they wouldn't buzz.

So, how about if you give me a break from typing until your new strings break in, and we'll see how it shakes out.

(I'm a d***, I know. Still, I'm pushing 70 and I refuse to apologize for it. )
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 1, 2017,
#9
Garthman From the words of the TS, in the OP:

" i also don't think its backbow as my guitar has the small space there any help"?

Relief, relief, relief, a rose by any other name, I think.
#10
do the strings buzz all the time? or do they just buzz when open?  If they buzz when fretted do they all buzz on all the frets?
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#12
It's an indication that the guitar is not quite perfectly set up.  Assuming the relief is spot on, raising the nut and lowering the saddle are in order especially if you play up the neck frequently.  I used  a .004 brass shim in a similar circumstance on a lovely Framus and the saddle was height adjustable. OTOH as Garthman noted a temporary adjustment of the truss will allow you to play til it works out.  Time may relieve the buzzing but in the back of your mind you still know that the relative string height over the fretboard is not optimum.
I'm being pretty nitpicky, it's probably not worth really bothering about.
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
Garthman  From the words of the TS, in the OP:

" i also don't think its backbow as my guitar has the small space there any help"?

Relief, relief, relief, a rose by any other name, I think.

Perhaps there isn't enough "small space"?  
#14
Quote by skido13
It's an indication that the guitar is not quite perfectly set up.
It's also an indication that new strings require less tension, than used ones. You can stretch the strings, but if overdone, that can kill the tone prematurely.

Quote by skido13
 Assuming the relief is spot on, raising the nut and lowering the saddle are in order especially if you play up the neck frequently.  I used  a .004 brass shim in a similar circumstance on a lovely Framus and the saddle was height adjustable. OTOH as Garthman noted a temporary adjustment of the truss will allow you to play til it works out.  Time may relieve the buzzing but in the back of your mind you still know that the relative string height over the fretboard is not optimum.
If this information and suggestion were to be taken too literally by a relatively new player, we'd be responding to that famous lament, "I can't do a 1st fret F major barre chord",

Quote by skido13
I'm being pretty nitpicky, it's probably not worth really bothering about.
Well, I don't know how much technical information need be supplies to what appears to be a novice player, certainly a novice re-stringer.

But what hell , if you want very low action on a guitar, when you play it, you will get buzz. Which then turns into sort of a "chicken or the egg" conundrum; "is the guitar buzzing, or is it being played too hard". You can make any guitar buzz, based on your attack.

Since you have your Framus analogy, I'll return to my 12 string analogy.Most people, (myself included), have a tough time fretting 12 strings. So, you drop the action. But that opens you up to possible string buzz. You can either accept the fact that, "it doesn't come through the amp", an electric players often do, or,just use a lighter pick. I know using a lighter pick is "not manly" but it solves a lot of problems where smoothness, speed of strumming, and helping to prevent pick drop are concerned.
#15
Quote by Garthman
Perhaps there isn't enough "small space"?  
Perhaps. But OTOH,(ostensibly), the only variable here is the age of the strings.I say new strings buzz at the same height older one don't. Unless a guitar's action has an issue before I restring it, then I don't feel the need to make "repairs". Actually, more often than not, if an acoustic guitar requires work with a string change, it's for the action to be lowered, not raised.

I could see running into this issue with nylon strings, as they can be purchased in different tensions.

To go back to my perhaps, "irrelevant" 12 string analogy. I don't usually stretch strings too much, if at all, as it can turn them quickly into old strings.

So, I dropped the action considerably on a 12 string, along with installing new strings., and tuned it to D-d. I played it just a bit, then re-tuned a couple of times. The guitar was left on a stand for a day or so. I went to play it last night, and the tuning was down almost a semitone, just from sitting. It buzzed a bit, (the action is very low), I tuned it back up, and it buzzed less. Then I got a lighter pick, and backed off on my attack a bit, and it hardly buzzed at all.

Since 12 strings, more often than not, require tuning every time you sit down to play them, and oftentimes between songs, I'm not going to drive myself into hysterics, sanding this, shimming that, or twisting the other thing, I'm going to be patient until the strings settle in, and adjust my playing a bit to compensate. Of course, your priorities, as well as those of the TS may vary.
#16
Quote by girplayz.mc
CorduroyEW only buzz on first fret and open i believe but the buzz does go away a bit when fretting first then completely on second onwards

I think the new strings are either pulling with less force and/or slightly smaller than the last set of things.  This means there is a good chance your truss rod is now too tight.  Give it a quarter turn and see if it helps reduce buzz.  If it buzzes less but still buzzes then keep loosening.  If it doesn't seem to change the buzz then your new strings are probably sitting a little deeper in the nut slots than the last set.  You can fix this in one of 2 ways.  You could remove the nut and superglue some paper under the nut to give it a little more height or you can slightly fill in the slots with a bit of superglue.  If nut slots are way too deep then you will want to mix the superglue with baking soda but I doubt the nut slots are THAT deep so superglue along should do the trick.  After applying a drip of glue in each slot remove the extra using old strings.  Press them all the way down in the slot and then pull them out.  This should leave a very thin layer of glue in the slot.  You don't want lots of glue left because if there is too much glue you will have to recut the slots with some nut files.
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#17
Captaincranky hey! okay so the buzz hasnt gone away entirely but i do think it has lessened to the point where i can play through it but maybe i stringed it badly should i try gently removing the strings to where theyre reusable as theyre only a week old and i havent clipped them and putting them back on?