#1
I'm aware that things such as temperature and humidity can affect a guitar as it is made out of wood but I had a question about this. I leave my guitars in my room on a stand. I live in Socal so the weather here is really hot. I've been meaning to install an AC or either use a fan in my room but I don't know if it would mess up my guitars wood? Figured I'd ask here before doing anything
#2
Quote by nextgen12
I'm aware that things such as temperature and humidity can affect a guitar as it is made out of wood but I had a question about this. I leave my guitars in my room on a stand. I live in Socal so the weather here is really hot. I've been meaning to install an AC or either use a fan in my room but I don't know if it would mess up my guitars wood? Figured I'd ask here before doing anything


I'm in SoCal as well. I leave my guitars in their cases for several reasons, including athletic cats, earthquakes, a spousal unit who cleans....uh...aggressively and, of course, temperature and humidity variations. There's also the cruddy air. Leaving them in the cases means that temperature and humidity gradients happen very slowly. Rapid changes are worse for guitars. They also don't get dusty and dirty and the strings last longer. About that -- I've been known to keep a VCI (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) emitter in the cases with some of the guitars; it cuts *way* back on corrosion to the metal bits and it may actually help out the finishes a bit. If you're a gun owner, you've probably kept some of your guns in those VCI bags inside their little cases. Same thing.

AC dries the air as it cools it. All AC units have a collector or a drip pan for condensation. I had to stay in Alabama for a while, down by the bay, and the hotel had excellent aircon. Walk outside and you immediately felt as if you'd been smacked by a wet, hot blanket. Same in Tampa, come to think of it. Except that in Tampa, every day around 3 pm there'd be a period of rain. It was just the humidity being squeezed out of the air as the temperature dropped for the evening. It was still 100% humidity at the new temperature, but it was 100% *relative* humidity. Sorry, I digress. Generally, LA's not as humid as it is right now. It's essentially desert, except near the beach. If you install AC, you're probably going to want to put some of those humidifier things in the case with your guitars. If you have them sitting out on stands, you may want to have a humidifier in the room just to keep them happy. And again when the Santa Anas blow. These things affect acoustics more than solid body electrics (in general), but you'll find your maple necks, in particular, beginning to wave around of their own volition. Nitrocellulose finishes will do some stupid things if left out under these conditions, but the finish on polyester-painted guitars is fairly bulletproof except, you know, when real bullets are involved. Yet another reason not to have a crazy ex-girlfriend.
#3
dspellman Thankfully I don't have to worry about an aggressive cleaner just yet lol. I do have a stand of 5 guitars out there and I like the easy access to them. I might just keep my two most played ones in cases but def getting a humidifier for the rest. Thanks
#4
nextgen12Humidity is measured as "relative humidity", which means how much water air is able to hold at any given temperature. As air cools , containing the same amount of moisture, the "RH" will increase. For the sake of illustration, say you have air @90 degrees, w/ 50% RH, cool that same air mass to 70 degrees, and the RH will spike, to perhaps 60% or 70%.

I can only speak to the summer climate I have to deal with, which is in the Delaware Valley, (SE PA, NJ, & DE). Given that this area is prone to indulging somewhat tropical air masses. IN THIS CLIMATE,during the summer, I simply can't afford to run the air conditioning cold enough, to hurt my guitars. (Outside air cools in the "shade" of a homes interior, and RH increases.

However, I'm dealing with acoustics, which are much more sensitive to too much, or too little humidity.

You should get an accurate hygrometer, just to keep tabs on what the heck is going on, regarding "water in the air".

With a solid body electric, you'll have much less day to day changes in action height, and much lees potential for cracking the guitar, than you would with an acoustic. I'm not saying you shouldn't attend to stabilizing moisture content in the air, you simply get to panic a lot later with solid body guitars.

The winter is a lot more deadly than the summer, as older heating systems without humidification, can destroy acoustics in short order. RH in the range of less than 20% is extra deadly. Nominally, you would be shooting for about 40%.

So, buy a hygrometer, AC is fine, as long as you're not psychotic enough to run it at 68 degrees, or thereabouts. In the winter, a freestanding humidifier might be necessary. The fact is, maintaining humidity in the middle of the scale, is good for your comfort, as well as the guitar's.

All of the foregoing, is dependent or YOUR climate, not mine. Investigate the weather on an hourly basis. (The Weather Channel has a local forecasts, hour by hour). I keel it open on a separate tab, a hygrometer on top of a loudspeaker, and the air running at about 77 or 78 degrees. The "dew points" here have been running close to 70 degrees, which is sticky! The RH is showing about 65, and has been bouncing up and down to a low of about 40%. My acoustics seem happy, although the action may be a touch higher than will be in winter, due to the tops puffing up ever so slightly.