#1
hey so i have buzzing of the strings but it doesnt seem to be fret buzz but thats besides the point i stringed my guitar wrong and would like to know if it was possible to reuse relatively new strings after removing them they havent been clipped id just like to string the guitar again because i did it wrong the first time
#2
Well, if theres no kinks in the strings, and if you haven't clipped the ends of the string at the tuning posts (meaning theres excess at the tuning posts), then yes.

Just remove said strings, and carefully slot the tip through the posts as you would do with a new string, mindful not to create a kink that would cause a snap as tension comes on.

I personally have done this and as long as you're careful enough it shouldnt be an issue.
#4
Take them all off once at a time. It prevents the neck from losing its position (tension, keeps the neck straight).

Take one off, replace it/swap the string put it back.

Did you string all of them wrongly? Haha
#5
girplayz.mc I'd be interested in a more detailed explanation of what you mean by, "I stringed my guitar wrong", and why you believe it would help to give yourself a "do-over".

I can tell you that if the bends at the tuning post are a possible point of breakage, if they're not exactly at the posts where they were originally,

Once you bend the right angle into the string, it should be forever. Every time you straighten out a bend, it fatigues the metal. Whether it causes the string to break is influenced by a number of factors. Taking the original bend out on wound strings, can cause the wrap to slip, killing some of the tone.

Changing tunings often, is notorious for killing tone and breaking strings. While I don';t do that, I've concluded that releasing the tension on a string set to perhaps adjust saddle height, does indeed kiil the tone prematurely. YMMV.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 5, 2017,
#6
If you plan on swapping them to a position with a shorter string, it likely won't  be a problem, but going longer isn't so easy, for the reasons noted by Captaincranky .

I lengthen, and also repair broken strings, by removing as much of the bent part as I can and attaching a length of thicker (wound) string to extend it, using a sheet bend:




I've been doing this for years, and only very rarely does it slip, provided you make a good tight bend in the thick (blue in the pics) side first with a pair of pliers. My guitars currently have several repairs like this between them. It used to get commented on at gigs, and I would tell the audience that it was essential for the authentic acoustic blues tone.  
#7
Quote by Tony Done
...[ ]...It used to get commented on at gigs, and I would tell the audience that it was essential for the authentic acoustic blues tone.  
As appalling, horrific, and absurd, as that sounds, it probably isn't far away, if any distance, from the truth.

I'm picturing an old Negro with a ten dollar guitar, complaining about how his crops failed during the dust bowl, there being no work in the city during the great depression, or the missus just left and took everything including the dog, popping on down to the local music store, and springing for a new set of "Elixirs", which BTW, won't be invented for another 60 years, at least.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 5, 2017,
#8
Captaincranky 

As long as the knot isn't between the nut and the bridge, it works fine. Even Doc Watson apparently used to take off his strings, boil and retwist them with hand drill to increase their working life.  I've also read about charities that recycle old strings to African nations.
#10
Quote by massington
Captaincranky the tuning posts sre touching and in reference to the buzzing string it only buzzes when tuned properly (standard)
You lost me amigo. Are you responding to the wrong thread, (there are 2 similar threads ATM), or are you responding because you've actually seen the guitar in question?
#11
Quote by Tony Done
If you plan on swapping them to a position with a shorter string, it likely won't  be a problem, but going longer isn't so easy, for the reasons noted by Captaincranky .

I lengthen, and also repair broken strings, by removing as much of the bent part as I can and attaching a length of thicker (wound) string to extend it, using a sheet bend:




I've been doing this for years, and only very rarely does it slip, provided you make a good tight bend in the thick (blue in the pics) side first with a pair of pliers. My guitars currently have several repairs like this between them. It used to get commented on at gigs, and I would tell the audience that it was essential for the authentic acoustic blues tone.  

LOL - I do that too but only on nylon strings - the D string especially tends to break before the others and usually either at the tuning peg or the saddle so I keep a spare one for repairs - I use the same knot as you.
#12
GarthmanTony Done I'm confused, the knot shown in the diagram is a "granny knot", which, (according to the boy scout manual, is more prone to slippage than the preferred "square knot". (I think, I do recall saying I was confused)
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 7, 2017,
#13
Nah, this is a granny knot, and yes, they slip:






This is a square knot, which the Brits call a reef knot. Reef knots don't slip when joining cords of the same size, but IIRC, the sheet bend is better if they are different thicknesses. 


Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 7, 2017,