#1
Anybody have one or played one? Just wondering because I just ordered one. LOL I wanted to get a b-day present for myself and something that was an upgrade over my yamaha and seagull. I was originally looking at a Taylor 214ce but then I came upon a video of a guy playing a Faith. After some research, it seems they are extremely popular in the UK and I couldn't find a bad word about them anywhere. I chose it over the Taylor because it's all solid wood, has all the same features(bolt-on neck and all) and comes with a hard case for a little less $ than the Taylor. Also the trembesi wood B&S intrigues me, supposed to be tonally inbetween rosewood and mahogany. Unfortunately there's only a couple Faith dealers in the US so trying it wasn't an option. I ordered the mini-jumbo(neptune) model. Hope I made a good choice.
#2
We'll be expecting pictures as soon as you get it!

That out of the way, the same is true here, I've heard of Faith, but have never seen or heard one.

In any case, a lot of people consider Taylor's 2xx series dogs. You are playing for bling, not necessarily tonal quality.

In fact, many people feel the 1xx series are the better sounding of the "Mexi-Taylors"..

I like to postulate, ("argue"), that Stradivarius violins are finished with varnish, as are Taylor's 100's. For as much as players complain about poly, you'd think they'd be not so very eager to "step up" to it on the twosies. (Or is is a "step down". I suppose it depends on who you ask).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 7, 2017,
#3
I played one, was very very impressed with the tone and sustain.  Had mahogany B&S.
#5
Captaincranky 

Is the finish on the 100 series that much different from the 200? - Except one is a flat finish, the other gloss. Those flat finishes seem often to be used to make flaws less obvious (try polishing one!), so they can be used for a rougher, cheaper job. I would have though it is more about production cost than chemistry, but I'm not sure.

FWIW, the reason I like Taylors is their neck, general construction and playability, and that counts for a big part of my vote on brand preferences, nothing much to do with tone or finish.

EDIT Just checked Faith - they have a bolt-on neck, so that puts they at least potentially in the same league as Taylor. I haven't seen them here, but if I did, I would be giving them a serious look.
Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 8, 2017,
#6
Quote by Tony Done
Captaincranky 

Is the finish on the 100 series that much different from the 200? - Except one is a flat finish, the other gloss. Those flat finishes seem often to be used to make flaws less obvious (try polishing one!), so they can be used for a rougher, cheaper job. I would have though it is more about production cost than chemistry, but I'm not sure....[ ]...
Yes, it is that different:

https://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic/features/finish

The 100 series has an open pore finish, no wood filler.

Arguably, "polyurethane" is considered a varnish, at least with respect to home applications. I don't think Taylor is using the term in that semantic sense. I think the varnish is a different, not poly material.
#7
I have a naked faith ,   And I am not digging mine as much as I thought I would  and its more to do with the sound maybe not enough bass or not loud enough  ,  Its a well made guitar and I love the neck on my  guitar,    but its not for me cant put my finger on what it is ,  maybe its to folk sounding I wouldn't like to say there bad you might love yours,  I'm actually going to try an acoustic pickup in mine and see if I can like it enough not to sell it .
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Aug 8, 2017,
#9
Tony Done Well it really is difficult to tell where traditional materials and vernacular terminology end, and "better living through chemistry" begins.

Here's where "shellac and "lacquer" originally came from: Definition of lac. : a resinous substance secreted by a scale insect (Laccifer lacca) and used chiefly in the form of shellac.

Nitrocellulose is plant cellulose, dissolved in nitric acid. Any solvent which will dissolve that can be used as a vehicle for it to apply as a "paint". (Although any true lacquer isn't paint). And nitrocellulose, is basically, "cellophane".

Once upon a time, exterior varnish was very often called :"spar varnish", derived from the fact it was used to paint the spars of sailing ships. (Or could be used thus).

In any event, for a finish to be classified as a varnish, the primary consideration is that it be transparent.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 8, 2017,
#10
dazzzer30 What size/model is yours? I have a breedlove pursuit concert size, cedar top which like you- I just don't dig the sound of it although it's a very nice guitar. Not sure if it's the cedar or the smaller size. I ordered the neptune/mini-jumbo based on my seagull being a mini-jumbo size and I like that size(similiar to Taylors Grand auditorium I think), nice tone and volume but not as boomy as a dread.
#12
Quote by hotrodney71
dazzzer30 What size/model is yours? I have a breedlove pursuit concert size, cedar top which like you- I just don't dig the sound of it although it's a very nice guitar. Not sure if it's the cedar or the smaller size. I ordered the neptune/mini-jumbo based on my seagull being a mini-jumbo size and I like that size(similiar to Taylors Grand auditorium I think), nice tone and volume but not as boomy as a dread.


I have the faith naked Neptune , size I think they call it Baby-Jumbo size - top Solid Sitka Spruce, its build very good and I love the feel of the neck in fact one of the best necks I seen , I am mostly a hard strummer type player not sure if this guitar is suited to that , I am sort of hoping the sound  grows on me and one day I think I really like this sound -   I have thought about selling it but probably wouldn't get half the money I paid for it .
#13
dazzzer30 hmmm, now I'm wondering if I should have got the dread(saturn) or jumbo size. I'm a strummer, not necessarily a hard strummer, used to be but I've learned to have a more moderate touch. I know what you mean, smaller size guitars can sound a little compressed when strummed hard but dreads can sound a little harsh and boomy. Oh well I have 14 days I think to return it if I don't like it. I think I will like it though. Should be here tomorrow.
#14
Quote by hotrodney71
dazzzer30 hmmm, now I'm wondering if I should have got the dread(saturn) or jumbo size. I'm a strummer, not necessarily a hard strummer, used to be but I've learned to have a more moderate touch. I know what you mean, smaller size guitars can sound a little compressed when strummed hard but dreads can sound a little harsh and boomy. Oh well I have 14 days I think to return it if I don't like it. I think I will like it though. Should be here tomorrow.

Yep give it a try I will be interested to know if you like it ,  I have been trying to adjust my playing with this guitar  and it doesn't  sound bad its just sometimes I want a bit more  boom but over all I am happy to keep it , its got me wondering as tony said if this guitar is also more for fingerpickers  ,  
#15
I'm a little late but I'll offer my 2 cents.  Faith guitar are very good.  They are well built and sound great to my ear.  I've only been tempted to buy an acoustic guitar 3 times in the last 15 years and one of the 3 is a Faith.  As for size  there is potential in all 3 even if you are a strummer.  The strummers tend to like dreads more when playing unplugged because they get more lower midrange that warms up and  fills out the acoustic tone but can get out of control if you try and plug in causing them to sound boomy and causing issues with feedback.  The bigger guitars like mini jumbo or jumbos have a better low end  but less lower midrange so they are easier to make sound good plugged in.  A lot of strummers like the smaller guitars too.  The reason finger pickers flock to them is largely because the smaller guitar are more responsive but that doesn't take away from the fact that they work well for strumming.  The low end won't be as full as a larger body guitar and they don't typically sound as warm but if you are playing in a band a smaller body can be a good way to not muddy things up in the band.  I also think that if you are playing plugged in small body guitars are typically easier to make sound great then dreads.  I do a lot of front of house sound for local venues and so I have a lot of experience trying to get guitars to sound good on stage.  Dreads are by far the most difficult acoustic guitar to make sound good plugged in but I think that unplugged they tend to sound the best.
Not taking any online orders.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at Aug 11, 2017,
#17
Quote by hotrodney71
dazzzer30 hmmm, now I'm wondering if I should have got the dread(saturn) or jumbo size. I'm a strummer, not necessarily a hard strummer, used to be but I've learned to have a more moderate touch. I know what you mean, smaller size guitars can sound a little compressed when strummed hard but dreads can sound a little harsh and boomy. Oh well I have 14 days I think to return it if I don't like it. I think I will like it though. Should be here tomorrow.

Actually I have changed my mind I like the sound  - changed the strings to lights  , lowered the saddle mine was a bit on the high side  , adjusted the neck  , sounds much better guess I should have done all this when I got the guitar  , 
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Aug 13, 2017,
#18
dazzzer30 the guitar also needs to be played in a little while before it starts to open up and sound full.  Give it a few weeks to settle in.
Not taking any online orders.
#19
dazzzer30 Well, all acoustic guitars are fairly temperamental about how they sound. Too much or too little humidity, string gauge, their age and alloy, (PB or 80/20 bronze), ambient noise such as air conditioners or hip-hop a half a block away, and even the player's mood, can have profound effects on a guitar's sound. One huge difference is the sound of the room, and it's something you can't escape. Sometimes there is a disparity between what you think you want to hear, and what you think you're hearing.

Strings produce the most dramatic audible difference. So, unless you have a specific complaint about the guitar; IE, not enough bass, where you'd need a larger body to remedy the situation, stick with it.

The larger truth is, one acoustic isn't likely to satisfy all your sonic wants, needs, or desires. That said, start shopping for your next box, while you enjoy this one.

Something else you might try, is have someone else play the guitar to you. That is really a better gauge of its sound, rather than sitting behind it.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 14, 2017,
#20
Well after a few days, the verdict is in...this guitar is amazing! Mine came set up perfectly with comfortable low action so it's really nice to play and love the satin finish on the neck. It sounds great strummed or single note runs, beautiful rich tone, evenly balanced and like someone else said - incredible sustain. They don't skimp anywhere on these guitars, top quality materials right down to the ebony bridge pins. The trembesi wood is beautiful, as is the ebony fretboard. If there is one negative, I'd say that it's not real loud. You would need to plug it in to play even a small venue but that's a plus for me because I live in an apt. and I don't need to bother my landlord upstairs. The neptune model is more like a concert, maybe grand auditorium in size(slightly smaller than my seagull mini jumbo). 
#21
dazzzer30 What pick do yo use? That also makes a HUGE difference. I tried several and I think a heavier pick sounds best with this guitar - deeper and warmer. I like the dunlop 1.14 nylon best.
#23
Anyone looking for a high end guitar at a pretty reasonable price should consider Faith. I think there' only 3 dealers in the US though. That's all I could find. So glad I stumbled across these before dropping more money on a MIM Taylor with laminate sides and back. 
#24
Quote by hotrodney71
dazzzer30 What pick do yo use? That also makes a HUGE difference. I tried several and I think a heavier pick sounds best with this guitar - deeper and warmer. I like the dunlop 1.14 nylon best.

I am glad you like your new guitar !  Mine is not an electric  acoustic looks the same apart from a few miner things ,  I do have a cut away electric acoustic so I didn't feel the need for another one ,  and I think if I needed it  louder  this guitar would be better in front of a mic than using a pick up .  I would recommend getting a pick guard .
#25
Quote by hotrodney71
Anyone looking for a high end guitar at a pretty reasonable price should consider Faith. I think there' only 3 dealers in the US though. That's all I could find. So glad I stumbled across these before dropping more money on a MIM Taylor with laminate sides and back. 

I'm pleased you like the guitar. As I mentioned earlier in the thread I've played a few Faith guitars and have been impressed. 

And as you say - there is no need to spend $ zillions to get a good guitar these days - as well as Faith models you could have likely found something equally good from brands such as: Cort, Crafter, LAG, Recording King, Tanglewood, Vintage, Yamaha, etc.

Enjoy!
#26
Garthman 

The thing that caught my eye with Faith, which for me separates the sheep from the goats is the bolt-on neck, though I don't know anything about their system. Taylor have a good bolt-on system, LaSiDo (Seagull etc) used to have bolt-on necks, but I think they might have changed to epoxy.

I'm another that doesn't think that price and performance are closely related in modern acoustics.
#27
Garthman Yep, I have a Yamaha A1R and a Seagull maritime that are both very good guitars (especially for the $$) but the Faith is a little better than both. I think my acoustic collection is now complete. 
#28
I think most guitars are way over priced especially when you consider where most are made like china,   it makes me really wonder how much the guitar is really worth .  Personally I favour the Yamaha models over most of the others  in there price ranges ,   although I mostly now only  buy used guitars as you get a better deal on price and bigger collection .
#29
Quote by dazzzer30
I think most guitars are way over priced especially when you consider where most are made like china,   it makes me really wonder how much the guitar is really worth . . . . . . . . .  

The selling price of a guitar is made up of several elements: materials, labour costs. shipping costs, agent (and/or brand owner) mark up and retailer mark up.

Materials: consist. of course, of timber, trimmings and components. The timber is likely to be a commodity item that spec for spec will cost a similar price wherever it is sourced. The trimmings and components (binding, machine heads, electronics,etc, etc) are likely to be PacRim made anyway - even if they are used by a non-PacRim manufacturer - obviously the cost will vary depending on quality.. 

Labour costs: will be high in the West and low in the East (generally). 

Shipping costs will be quite high for PacRim made guitars being shipped to the West (they are bulky items), lower for West-made ones. 

Agent/brand owner: area agents and distributors will take a mark up depending on the extent of their input. For brand owners (like Recording King, Tanglewood, Blueridge, Vintage, etc,) there will be a significant mark up (they are generally West-based companies outsourcing manufacturing to PacRim countries) whereas for brand owners who make their own guitars (like Cort, Crafter, etc) the mark up may be less.

Retailer: will mark up guitars for whatever they think they can get.

So it's quite a complex mixture. But spec for spec it's probably the labour costs that matter most - despite the use of lots of machines guitar making is still quite a labour intensive process. And, of course, there are some very, very cheap guitars available - to be sure the materials are cheap and the quality control may leave much to be desired but if you shop around and are lucky you can pick up a quite good instrument for very little money. My most-played guitar is a cheap and cheerful all-laminate instrument that I bought used for £30 - they sold new for approx £90.
#30
Quote by dazzzer30
I think most guitars are way over priced especially when you consider where most are made like china,   it makes me really wonder how much the guitar is really worth .  Personally I favour the Yamaha models over most of the others  in there price ranges ,   although I mostly now only  buy used guitars as you get a better deal on price and bigger collection .
Without getting into a bunch of typing about comparative pricing, and fair wages, I'll just say you sound like someone who expects their guitars handed to them, free of charge. Maybe when you're famous, that will happen for you. Good luck with that.

In the meantime, make a mental note that while you're over here, idling away your days playing those 'overpriced guitars', some nice Asian trying to support his or her family, got up and busted their ass all day for two bucks an hour, to bring it to you.
#31
You guys didn't mention what is probably the biggest factor in a guitars price - the name on the head stock. FWIW, I got 20% off the Faith because the guitar was a return. This made me quite happy. My Yamaha A1R I got for $328. They changed them a little this year and sweetwater had the old stock on close out a few months ago. That was an insanely good deal for a great guitar.
#32
Quote by Captaincranky
Without getting into a bunch of typing about comparative pricing, and fair wages, I'll just say you sound like someone who expects their guitars handed to them, free of charge. Maybe when you're famous, that will happen for you. Good luck with that.

In the meantime, make a mental note that while you're over here, idling away your days  playing those 'overpriced guitars', some nice Asian trying to support his or her family, got up and busted their ass all day for two bucks an hour, to bring it to you.

I would love a guitar for free who wouldn’t,! for the guys in china working for 2 bucks that was my point the guitars are over priced by using cheap labour and cheaper materials and then seller at a much higher price, I do feel sorry if they are working for 2 bucks but what about all the people that lost there jobs because company’s  decided to move shop and build guitars in china?   The truth is I don’t buy guitars that are made in  china much  unless there used and cheap, apart from that if you have a morel issue with how much they get paid then don't buy them from china  because its the  guitar company's  that are using cheap labour not the custoumers .
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Yesterday