#1
Hello! I've decided to start playing guitar again after once-upon-a-time having a Fender Telecaster from 1986-1997. Yesterday I picked up a like new Roland Cube-20X amp and strat stlye guitar for $75. The amp alone is worth quite a bit more than that - the guitar was a bonus. Unfortunately, the guitar is a piece of junk.

I've decided to upgrade/rebuild the thing which is something I'd never considered doing before. It sounds like a fun project. I figure I can put together a decent playing good looking guitar for not too much money to test the waters. I've basically decided to just use the body—everything else will be replaced. What I'm wondering is is whether the body is worth using before I get busy sanding and refinishing it.

I don't know what wood it's made out of. It weighs 3 lbs 2 oz (including the bridge and tremolo parts) which is kind of light. I want to use 3 single coil pickups. Should the neck and bridge cavities be filled in to fit just single coils or will it not affect the tone?

Just from the photos is there anything here that says "junk quality - don't waste your time"?

Any help appreciated.

Thanks!




#2
I would see that kind of cavity arrangement as a bonus - you might want to change your pickup configuration at some time - and it won't affect tone.

FWIW, the part I worry least about is the body - it is just a piece of wood that holds the neck, pickups, hardware etc, so I would leave it as-is, a nice somewhat relic finish, unless I really had something against it.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
I would see that kind of cavity arrangement as a bonus - you might want to change your pickup configuration at some time - and it won't affect tone.

FWIW, the part I worry least about is the body - it is just a piece of wood that holds the neck, pickups, hardware etc, so I would leave it as-is, a nice somewhat relic finish, unless I really had something against it.

+1

It's amusing how often people with genuinely road-worn guitars want to get them all shiny and pristine again, while others spend hours beating on their instrument () to make it look like it's been around the block a bit.
#4
Quote by Tony Done
I would see that kind of cavity arrangement as a bonus - you might want to change your pickup configuration at some time - and it won't affect tone.

FWIW, the part I worry least about is the body - it is just a piece of wood that holds the neck, pickups, hardware etc, so I would leave it as-is, a nice somewhat relic finish, unless I really had something against it.

Thanks - I will leave the cavities as is. I decided to keep the neck as well. I'll just replace the pickups and hardware. I HAVE to repaint the thing. It's ugly plus I'd like to learn how. It's hard to see from the photos but it had a bunch of blue tape on the body and headstock - an attempt to make it look Van Halenesque. I removed the tape but it's faded beneath.
#5
Quote by von Layzonfon
+1

It's amusing how often people with genuinely road-worn guitars want to get them all shiny and pristine again, while others spend hours beating on their instrument () to make it look like it's been around the block a bit.


This is going to be fun though. I'll get some pleasure and satisfaction knowing I restored and improved a guitar. I'll let it get the roadworn look naturally.
#6
Quote by Krishnoid
This is going to be fun though. I'll get some pleasure and satisfaction knowing I restored and improved a guitar. I'll let it get the roadworn look naturally.

Absolutely.  I'm on the shiny side myself.
#7
I think this will be a fun project for you! I have a really nice playing squire strat I have been debating rebuilding for the sole purpose of learning. Keep us updated with your progress. 
#8
SpoiledReefer

There's been a slight change in plans. I was at Music Go Round yesterday just looking around for accessories and I saw a guitar I had to have. It's exactly how I envisioned my Strat clone restoration project ending up. It's a "used" brand new condition 2005 Squier Strat Affinity for $80! Made in Indonesia with an agathis body. It's flawless—doesn't look like it's ever been played.

My project now is upgrading the Squier but it won't take much. The frets are very sharp on the ends so they need to be filed down a bit. Plus I'll add new pickups and electronics. Other than that it's ready to go for me to get playing again. Now I don't have to wait.

I'm still going to put together and restore the other guitar eventually in a HSH configuration.


Last edited by Krishnoid at Aug 11, 2017,