#1
I hope everyone is doing fine!

I've recently started to learn guitar. I'm starting off with an acoustic but plan on moving to an electric later. 

One thing I've noticed watching a lot of professionals play guitar is that they play with the neck going higher. An example would be of Jim Root playing in this video.

 


His guitar is not horizontal, it's certainly at an angle.

Does it improve playing speed or finger stretching? Because recently I've tried to play on the fifth and the second fret at the same time and I find it so hard to do. Does elevating the neck help in any way? I've seen a lot of people do it but I don't know.

Please help me out. I plan on playing guitar for a long time and I surely would want to be playing like a professional later on. 
#2
Short answer: yes, raising the neck like that helps with just about everything your fretting hand does.

More detail:

Raising the neck helps in many ways:

1 - Your wrist is naturally straighter, and a straight wrist is something you should always be aiming for.  A straighter wrist means less stress/pressure on the tendons that go through your wrist.  Less stress on those means you'll be able to use them more easily (for moving your fingers), and you're less likely to develop a repetitive strain injury like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.  Take a good look at Jim's wrist in that video; his technique is pretty exemplar in the play through.

2 - Your thumb should be slightly lower on the neck, which is also a good thing, because it means you'll be able to stretch further.  I did have a link to a video explaining this hanging around somewhere but I can't seem to find it, and it's almost impossible to explain the reason this is true without showing you, so I'm going to have to ask you to just trust me on this, but it's absolutely true that the lower your thumb is on the neck the further you'll be able to stretch.

3 - Because of both of the above, you'll be able to play things more easily and therefore faster.  That's basically just a happy accident though, the other things are (if you ask me at least) more important.


Realistically, you don't need perfect technique to become a professional, at all, but if you're planning on playing for a long amount of time (like per day), playing for a great many years, or regularly playing things that are physically strenuous, it will only help.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#3
Pretty much exactly what Zaphod said. Also I hope you're not learning The Negative One when you're just starting out on guitar. That main riff is incredibly difficult for a beginner, almost borderline impossible to play well in my opinion. It requires a certain control and finesse with your bending that a beginner simply doesn't have.
Last edited by vayne92 at Aug 9, 2017,
#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Short answer: yes, raising the neck like that helps with just about everything your fretting hand does.

More detail:

Raising the neck helps in many ways:

1 - Your wrist is naturally straighter, and a straight wrist is something you should always be aiming for.  A straighter wrist means less stress/pressure on the tendons that go through your wrist.  Less stress on those means you'll be able to use them more easily (for moving your fingers), and you're less likely to develop a repetitive strain injury like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.  Take a good look at Jim's wrist in that video; his technique is pretty exemplar in the play through.

2 - Your thumb should be slightly lower on the neck, which is also a good thing, because it means you'll be able to stretch further.  I did have a link to a video explaining this hanging around somewhere but I can't seem to find it, and it's almost impossible to explain the reason this is true without showing you, so I'm going to have to ask you to just trust me on this, but it's absolutely true that the lower your thumb is on the neck the further you'll be able to stretch.

3 - Because of both of the above, you'll be able to play things more easily and therefore faster.  That's basically just a happy accident though, the other things are (if you ask me at least) more important.


Realistically, you don't need perfect technique to become a professional, at all, but if you're planning on playing for a long amount of time (like per day), playing for a great many years, or regularly playing things that are physically strenuous, it will only help.

Thank you SO MUCH for your reply. Especially about the CTS, and other information, I'll be adapting myself to playing the guitar with my wrist straighter. I do plan on playing for a long time as I myself make music and I want to add guitar to the mix. Once again, thank you so much for the detailed reply. 
Quote by vayne92
Pretty much exactly what Zaphod said. Also I hope you're not learning The Negative One when you're just starting out on guitar. That main riff is incredibly difficult for a beginner, almost borderline impossible to play well in my opinion. It requires a certain control and finesse with your bending that a beginner simply doesn't have.

Haha no no! I'm not learning anything by Slipknot right now. I have an acoustic and I'm learning other things that are on Standard E tuning and a bit easier to play. I've been learning for about two months now and know a few songs. The hardest for me was Stairway to Heaven because of the Barre chord you have to do. I pretty much learned it now and I'm happy. Learning Metallica's Nothing Else Matters now. That is where I need to stretch my fingers more. I have a long way to go. Thank you for your replies!