#1
To start, I cover songs mostly. So a lot of the time I have the tracks playing in the background while I play. This, accompanied with a tube amp, makes for a loud room.

Is it at all possible to use headphones with a tube head and other stuff like Macbook, etc? I watch numerous cover videos of players and a lot of them always have headphones on while playing, with laptops open in the background, as if there's a big ordeal of sound shit going on in recording.

Before I got back into guitar I told my wife it wouldn't be much of a problem for late nights since I could use headphones to still practice while she slept before work. Now I'm reading that seems to be a solid state thing...not tube amps.

Worse comes to worst, I'll just soundproof the music room at our new house which the wife already agreed on (since it will double as a mancave), but if there's any alternative, I'd love to hear it.

My gear is posted in my sig...any suggestions are appreciated!

ESP EC-1000 *Vintage Black*
Orange TH30 Head
Orange PPC212-OB

DiMarzio Cables
#2
Headphone outs are becoming commonplace with smaller, lower power tube amps.

If an amp does not come specifically with a headphone out, DO NOT attempt to use headphones with it in any way.

The process of making a tube amp work with headphones is not as simple as it seems, as what you're asking for it to do somewhat goes against the nature of how they're supposed to work.

  The problem with headphone outs on tube amps is that they tend to sound like absolute garbage. Much of what makes a guitar amp sound the way it does is through the tonal colouration of the speaker cabinet itself. Take that away and you're left with something that is totally unusable for quality recordings without using cabinet IR's. This is why products like Two Notes Torpedo Live exist. It is a very popular solution these days, as it is able to handle both the preamp and the power section signal from the amplifier, and then adding cabinet IR's that digitally simulate the tonal effects of a physical guitar cabinet to the guitar signal. It's popular for amp demos these days to use such a solution because it eliminates the finicky process of microphone positioning, and the noise that a physical live cabinet naturally creates. So it makes recording easy and silent. Being a digital simulation also means that these solutions give a near infinite degree of flexibility on the tonal profile of the virtual cabinet, so you can pretty much make it sound whatever way you want. The problem is that while the IR's in Two Notes are great, the unit itself is not exactly cheap.

Some amps claim to come with a 'Microphone-Simulated Direct Out' that do something similar to what a dedicated cabinet IR does, but without the power section part that the Two Notes solution has. The problem with those is that the ones that come built into amps always sound like total ass. I wouldn't consider such a thing to be a serious solution for recording. They're largely put on amps for marketing purposes only.

The only thing you absolutely must not do under any circumstance is to run the power section of the amplifier without a load. Headphone outs and solutions like Two Notes Torpedo are able to work without damaging the amp because they put a load (usually a big fat resistor) on the output transformer where a speaker would normally be. Without that load, the voltages that are being produced in the output transformer will have nowhere to go, they will continue to build up, the transformer gets hot, and then  it produces magic smoke and burns out. If your amplifier has a preamp output, do not automatically assume that the power section will have load attached to it. As that's when costly mistakes can be made. Preamp outs are designed specifically for the purpose of re-amping. Not for the purpose of wanting to play Stairway at 3am, or any other time of the day for that matter.

If playing and recording with a line signal is something you're going to be doing an awful lot of, and don't really care for getting your guitar signal any louder than that, then I suggest digital modelling preamp/cab IR solutions. They really are the way to go when tonal flexibility and convenience are concerned.
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#3
Laney IRT - has headphone and direct recording out if needed.

Of course best practice is to mic tube amps, so maybe look at iso cab (wither buying one or mking one) and you can then mix the signal in your DAW after you mic the amp.

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Jet-City-Amplification/JetStream-12-ISO-1x12-Isolation-Guitar-Speaker-Cabinet-1274423038772.gc

Another method is reamping...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Re-amp

They way I record now is tube amp in a closet with a blanket around it at low levels or reamp at stage volumes later when I can blast it. I monitor through headphones via my audio interface which has line monitoring so I am hearing what the mic is recording from the tube amp and mixing that in with the DAW signal.
#4
If you're already using a laptop, maybe look at VSTs & interface for late night use?
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#5
Coming from your Marshall, I highly suggest the combination of a Laney IRT-Studio (about $400 used) - 3 channels and it's a USB interface - and a V30 speaker impulse (IR) from your computer (I use Peavey ReValver with the Flathill (Mesa) 412) and it does great.

The IRT has speaker emulation built in as well if you want to use headphones directly with the amp but I prefer the external V30.
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#6
you'd need something like the two notes live
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#7
Quote by jcp42877
To start, I cover songs mostly. So a lot of the time I have the tracks playing in the background while I play. This, accompanied with a tube amp, makes for a loud room.

Is it at all possible to use headphones with a tube head and other stuff like Macbook, etc? I watch numerous cover videos of players and a lot of them always have headphones on while playing, with laptops open in the background, as if there's a big ordeal of sound shit going on in recording.

Before I got back into guitar I told my wife it wouldn't be much of a problem for late nights since I could use headphones to still practice while she slept before work. Now I'm reading that seems to be a solid state thing...not tube amps.

Worse comes to worst, I'll just soundproof the music room at our new house which the wife already agreed on (since it will double as a mancave), but if there's any alternative, I'd love to hear it.

My gear is posted in my sig...any suggestions are appreciated!


I have sigs turned off, so I'm afraid I'll miss that last.

I'm not sure why you're not using something that allows you to practice with headphones and that has an auxiliary input that doesn't have the albatross of a tube head attached? Anything from a Korg Pandora to a Pod HD500 will come with an auxiliary input (your "songs in the background") and everything comes through the headphone and nothing goes to a tube amp or speaker.
#8
dspellman 

Might have to check out the Pod HD500. I've watched a few videos of it and it seems pretty awesome. I guess that would alleviate the loudness while playing at night. Now just to save up for it!

Oh, and my gear is an Orange TH30, Orange 2x12 open back, and ESP EC-1000

ESP EC-1000 *Vintage Black*
Orange TH30 Head
Orange PPC212-OB

DiMarzio Cables
#9
Mesa CabClone could be implemented as part of what you want. The line or balanced out would have to go to an interface to your computer. Headphones can plug into the interface to allow the mixing of your backing tracks and the sound of your guitar through your tube amp. I occasionally use my guitar into an old Oberheim GM1000 into my Metric Halo interface to my Mac. Headphones into the Metric Halo allow me to hear the guitar and the backing tracks from the Mac. CabClone would do the same thing as my Oberheim. You would still require a decent interface for your computer, but the CabClone isn't outrageously expensive. The Pod alternative is viable too, and probably quite a bit cheaper. 

There are many ways to listen to backing tracks plus your guitar, and a tube amp solution is certainly the most cumbersome.
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#10
Quote by jcp42877
dspellman 

Might have to check out the Pod HD500. I've watched a few videos of it and it seems pretty awesome. I guess that would alleviate the loudness while playing at night. Now just to save up for it!

Oh, and my gear is an Orange TH30, Orange 2x12 open back, and ESP EC-1000


Wait, I guess I do *not* have sigs turned off. Just noticed your gear. Huh...
One of my amps is similar (except not designed specifically for high gain) -- a 50W EL84 combo with a pair of V30's. And I've got a raft of LP-style guitars, including some with 24-frets.

One of the reasons that I investigated Pods way back when was that I needed something to practice with at very low volumes (townhouse complex). I bought the Pod XT "bean" first, and then picked up a Korg Pandora PX3D because it was much smaller, had a bunch of practice features built in (I've currently got a couple of other Pandoras, including a PX5D), and it ran on batteries. With an iPod, I could practice to as many songs as I had space for on the iPod. In fact, the Pandoras had a phrase trainer that would allow me to practice on 40-second loops over and over again, a pitch shifter so that I could change the pitch of the song without affecting the speed, and a "slower-downer" that allowed me to change the *speed* of the song without changing the pitch. And so on. And it could all be done in the middle of a field somewhere.