#1
So I have a song that's kind of different and experimental, however I'm afraid to use it in an album I'm making with my friends. Should I risk it and go for it? Or just not use it?
#2
listen to the whole album

does it add anything? does it stick out in a bad way? does it fit the themes in the rest of the album?

cutting a song isn't the end of the world. a lot of highly popular/successful bands will write 30+ songs in pre-production, then pick the best of the best, record all of those, and then see how it all fits, and likely cut a few more or use them for bonus tracks down the line.

that being said, realistically, not that many people are gonna hear this. just have fun with it
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#4
People don't listen to full albums nowadays anyway, and your album wont have any sales anyway so it doesn't really matter. The only thing that matters is a) what tracks you release as singles b) the couple of first tracks on your album. So there kind of isn't anything to risk here. One out-of-place track on the album will probably go unnoticed by most, and not bother the rest.
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#5
Quote by powerhouse135
So I have a song that's kind of different and experimental, however I'm afraid to use it in an album I'm making with my friends. Should I risk it and go for it? Or just not use it?

Why not ask your friends? They might love it.  Or they might think (even if they like it) it spoils the vibe of the rest of the tracks.  It just depends whether you want the album to present a unified style, to give you an identity (commercially useful strategy), or want to present the album as an honest expression of where  you are now, creatively, however varied.  An alternative idea is to record/release the track as a one-off solo effort, if you can do that.
Just don't try and second guess what will be popular, or will sell.  Trying to give the people what they want - unless you're already doing that successfully - is doomed to failure.  Be true to yourself.
But discuss all the options with those friends.

I don't know if it's an appropriate example, but think about the Beatles Revolver album, and the track Tomorrow Never Knows.  That stood out as a wildly experimental track, unlike anything else they (or anyone else) had done before.  But the album would have been severely diminished if they'd left it out.  It's a killer!
Another would be Radiohead's Fitter Happier on OK Computer, with its Stephen Hawking-like voice processor. Weird? Sure!  Good idea?  Yes, in that few would regard it as the best track, but it showed the range of ideas they were working with.  They were brave enough not to care about presenting a unified front - but then (like the Beatles) they did have a respected history behind them, with no fear of commercial failure.
Last edited by jonriley64 at Aug 11, 2017,
#7
Kind of a combo of some things said here, in some past bands of ours where we wanted it included but wasn't a good aesthetic mix, we just recorded a live version at a show. 

bonus live track at the end.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike