#1
I recently bought a used agile al 3010 (les paul copy). I'm just wondering if you would set it up using the same specifications for a Gibson les paul. If not, does anyone have the specs for the agile les paul?
#2
Yes, you'd set it up the same way as you would a Gibson. But I personally don't set up either my Gibsons or my Agiles according to Gibson spec. For me that's medium-high action, and I prefer lower action.

There are some differences between most Gibsons and most Agiles, however, when it comes to spec. Most Gibsons have a fretboard radius of 10-12" (it varies) and use medium to medium-jumbo frets. Most Agiles have a fretboard radius of around 13.7" (round up to 14") and jumbo frets. Most Gibsons have a plastic nut, while most Agile 3010s come with a Tusq nut.

Both guitars should be checked for level frets, particularly if used.
#3
dspellman shocked that gibsons use a plastic nut..wow. Yet they and fender are .. nevermind. The agiles.. im considering an agile  pendulum or  intercepter pro in 6 or 8 months. Not sure about $500 plus for a chinese guitar though might just try a cheap $199 Douglas 7 string. Are they worth it??? What would you suggest
#4
cdreid
Most Agiles are still built in Korea, though some have leaked out into other countries. I really don't have any issues with country of origin on most guitars. When I bought my first Agile, I ordered a custom that was $1160, and even I thought I was a bit daft for getting a tarted-up $400 guitar from Korea. It's now 8 years old and was/is a great guitar that I honestly couldn't have picked up elsewhere for anywhere near the money. In fact, the closest Gibson came was a $5760 guitar that wasn't close in the features department.

I can't tell you much about Douglas guitars (these are a separate brand name sold by, but not originated by, Rondo Music). I have a few Douglas cases, but that's about it.
#5
Quote by dspellman
Yes, you'd set it up the same way as you would a Gibson. But I personally don't set up either my Gibsons or my Agiles according to Gibson spec. For me that's medium-high action, and I prefer lower action.

There are some differences between most Gibsons and most Agiles, however, when it comes to spec. Most Gibsons have a fretboard radius of 10-12" (it varies) and use medium to medium-jumbo frets. Most Agiles have a fretboard radius of around 13.7" (round up to 14") and jumbo frets. Most Gibsons have a plastic nut, while most Agile 3010s come with a Tusq nut.

Both guitars should be checked for level frets, particularly if used.
I want the lowest possible action without buzz. I pretty much know how to set up the Acton, just keep lowering it until it buzzes, and then raise it a tad until it stops. I'm really just asking as far as pickup height and neck tension.
#6
cdreid agile is Korean made. I got mine for $200 used. Mint condition minus worn strings. I paid around $500 for my Epiphone and I'd take the agile over the Epiphone all day. I don't know how they make such nice guitars without slave labor for the price. I've been working in manufacturing since I was 17 and it doesn't make sense.
#7
Thanks a lot for the suggestions. Im really jonesing for Two agile 7 strings right now Their higher end stuff is beautiful. I think im going to wait to the beginning of the year when he gets new stock in.. or save up for a custom. Id love a  lefty 7 string fanned fret with dimarzios or duncans in it with a solid bridge and outside rondo  prices for that would be in the multiple thousands.
#8
Quote by jollywhopper
I want the lowest possible action without buzz. I pretty much know how to set up the Acton, just keep lowering it until it buzzes, and then raise it a tad until it stops. I'm really just asking as far as pickup height and neck tension.


"Neck tension?" What in Gibson's literature tells you about "neck tension?"

IF you want the lowest possible action without buzz, getting to a point where you CAN lower it until it buzzes might require some adjustment of the nut, some leveling of the frets, some tweaking of the bridge. You don't accept those things as is if you're trying to get lowest possible action. Pickup height is only recommended by Gibson (and would be the same for an Agile), but is more accurately tied to quality of tone, etc. and is a personal preference.
#9
@cdreid Owner of a Douglas Hadron 727 here, and I wouldn't recommend it. The neck is terrible (binding looks jagged) and the nut is screwed in slightly closer to one side than the other, the pickups are microphonic and crappy sounding, the output jack doesn't work if you touch the cable, the floyd is terrible, the frets are rough, thus not worth it. Of course everything is fixable but I spent $150 on it and could've spent $50 more for a new schecter. I'd recommend shelling out a bit more for a used ibanez or a schecter. Legator has some good reviews too but I've never tried one myself.
Last edited by VanhalenVai at Sep 4, 2017,
#10
Quote by VanhalenVai
Owner of a Douglas Hadron 727 here, and I wouldn't recommend it. The neck is terrible (binding looks jagged) and the nut is screwed in slightly closer to one side than the other, the pickups are microphonic and crappy sounding, the output jack doesn't work if you touch the cable, the floyd is terrible, the frets are rough, thus not worth it. Of course everything is fixable but I spent $150 on it and could've spent $50 more for a new schecter. I'd recommend shelling out a bit more for a used ibanez or a schecter. Legator has some good reviews too but I've never tried one myself.


SO the OP is asking about an Agile (not a Douglas) which he already has (he's not "considering"), which is a 24.75" guitar very similar to an LP, not a 27" scale guitar with 7 strings and a Floyd at $175 new.

I think folks sometimes assume that every guitar at Rondo Music is an Agile, regardless of the brand on the headstock, but that's simply not true. Douglas and SX are brands that are available worldwide and Rondo offers them. Agile is a brand ONLY available through Rondo. Problems you have with a Douglas do not translate to Agiles.
#12
VanhalenVai thanks for that for a long time i jonesed for a 727. Im glad they didnt have one in stock. I picked up a used schecter banshee extreme 7 for 300 (!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) and its... awesome. Necks not as thin as id like but other than that its magnificent and beautiful. Now working on learning music theory so i can actually REALLY use it lol.
BTW if anyone does this  go watch the Ben Eller youtube video on his fav 7 string tuning its a bit brilliant.  ATM i  use his tuning some but  deadbge  and the original owner put what i swear to god must be a bass string on it (i had to refile the nut). Makes it VERY useable in any song you can name and oh my GOD the growl of that D string is amazing!!!
#13
cdreid I'm glad that guitar is working out for you so well, I'm in the market for another schecter right now. I have an omen 6 and I have to say that it is super simple; basswood body and maple neck, rosewood fretboard (note this was made when rosewood was the most available wood on a guitar), 2 humbuckers in pickup rings with no covers, volume and tone, solid finish, tune-o-matic, dot inlays, and no binding. What it sacrifices in features, it makes up for in sound. I honestly see no reason why people replace the schecter pickups, they are part of what makes their guitars so unique and they sound great!