#1
Recently got a secondhand Squier Telecoustic. It was free, so I can't complain, but while trying to change the strings. I noticed that the bridge pins were stuck. And I mean stuck. I've tried pulling them out with a bridge pin puller, a pair of pliers, a pair of wire cutters, but nothing's worked. I've even tried to use a nine-volt battery to push them out from the inside but the bridge pins haven't moved and there are now a few dents in a brand-new nine-volt. Changing strings have never been this hard. Help a brother out. Thanks in advance.
Guitar strings are $8.50 a pack and that's just too much for me.
#2
It is sometimes the thick part of the string near the string balls that is too thick, so get a pair of pliers and try pushing the string back down into the body.

When you get the pins out (which might mean destroying them), either make the pins smaller, or the holes bigger, or the string grooves deeper. I can't understand why tight fitting pins are used. All mine are a drop fit, it is only string tension that keeps them in.
Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 19, 2017,
#3
You can always try to shock them free - perhaps using the bridge pin puller, give the puller a tap with a hammer - not too hard, as you don't want to hit the guitar, but it might be worth a shot. 
#4
It sounds line someone has glued them in.

If so (depending on what sort of glue - some can be released with some heat although that is tricky) the only thing to do is to drill them out. File the top of each to make it flat, then use a small punch to dent the centre, then drill down with a small diameter drill, then with larger ones until you can see the string, then may be able to pull the pin off the hole side, but anyway take out the string  and drill out the rest of the pin.

All needs to be done very carefully.
#5
Quote by PSimonR
It sounds line someone has glued them in.

If so (depending on what sort of glue - some can be released with some heat although that is tricky) the only thing to do is to drill them out. File the top of each to make it flat, then use a small punch to dent the centre, then drill down with a small diameter drill, then with larger ones until you can see the string, then may be able to pull the pin off the hole side, but anyway take out the string  and drill out the rest of the pin.

All needs to be done very carefully.


Beat me to it. I've run across two guitars that had them superglued in. One guy thought they were just decorative and complained that they kept falling out when he changed strings. So he glued them in. Then realized that it was really tough to change strings ("I might have gotten some glue on the strings?"). The next question was, "Is this going to cost me a lot of money, just to get some little pins out?" I explained that getting the pins out was pretty cheap, but that the life lesson was worth every bit of the rest of the money. That buying a clue was expensive.