#1
 
I was looking online at some DIY solutions for tools for filing down and levelling frets. I've seen some nice ones online for sale that are essentially a file glued to an ergonomic piece of wood for about $60. Figured, could probably make one.

Anyone try making their own?

I'm looking online at Nicholson files (easy to find/order in Canada) and well, bastard cut, fine, axe sharpening, American style, Swiss style, etc... honestly thought it would be as simple as fine-to-coarse, single or double cut and that's all.  Also seems tricky to find a file that's flat, not tapered in thickness or tapered in width. 

Option#2 and an easier option, is to make one with sand paper... but that's too easy.

Actually, plan is to do a coarse and a fine metal file, 8-10" long for the bulk of the work, then do a sanding bar using very fine paper on it, maybe 800/1200grit.

Anyways... just looking for some advice on files to get (local Canadian Tire has almost none in stock so can't see how they feel for coarseness, plus never used a fret file before so no frame of reference) and maybe see if people would share some pics of their own DIY fretting tools.
Bio: Haven't played in 22yrs, just getting back into it. Mostly looking to build/repair than play.
Guitars: BC Rich Warlock, Agile AL-2000, Fender Squire SE (heavily modded), Washburn N2 (heavily modded)
Location: Zurich, ON (Canada)
#2
I just use a large sharpening stone to level frets.  I think it cost me $5 10 years ago...  To crown the frets getting the proper fret crowning file from a place like lmi or stewmac is highly recommended and will pay for itself (in time saved) after the 1st time you use it. 
Not taking any online orders.
#3
Ya, the smaller work I'll proably buy tools for... Crimson Guitars or StewMac. 

Levelling... just looking for some ideas/options that won't cost a lot, because I may do 2-3 guitars and get bored and never touch that stuff again.

I know how I am when it comes to hobbies... some stick and some don't. 

I think I read somewhere in passing, someone mentioned a sharpening stone. I'll have to look into that. After a while, does the surface become uneven? Going over all the peaks/valleys of a fret board? 
Bio: Haven't played in 22yrs, just getting back into it. Mostly looking to build/repair than play.
Guitars: BC Rich Warlock, Agile AL-2000, Fender Squire SE (heavily modded), Washburn N2 (heavily modded)
Location: Zurich, ON (Canada)
#4
My sharpening stone is 10 years old and still flat.  I use it a couple times a month.  Nickel frets are pretty soft and don't really wear the stone down.  Stainless frets could be different but I don't know because I haven't ever needed to level the frets of a guitar that used stainless.  
Not taking any online orders.
#6
I really need to get a passport... or Canada really needs to get a Harbor Freight. Though, likely, if we got one, it would be like Target. They finally came to Canada, offered us half the selection of what the US stores have, and wondered why they tanked in a year.

Are you talking about this block?
https://www.harborfreight.com/4-sided-diamond-hone-block-92867.html

That looks handy... though not seeing a length. I'm hoping to get or make something 8-10" long.
Bio: Haven't played in 22yrs, just getting back into it. Mostly looking to build/repair than play.
Guitars: BC Rich Warlock, Agile AL-2000, Fender Squire SE (heavily modded), Washburn N2 (heavily modded)
Location: Zurich, ON (Canada)
#7
The only specialised tool I use is a diamond grit crowning file from Stewmac. I use a diamond knife hone, the kind that comes mounted on a wood block, for levelling. You could buy a cheaper one and mount it on a wood block yourself. Carpet tape is good for that kind of thing

Fret masks are useful for polishing. You can use tape, or buy Stewmac masks. I have made them from brass shim and aluminium drink can.
#8
I think what I'll do is hop onto Kijiji / Craigslist, and find a 12" metal level for cheap... seen a few for around $10 though a bit long... and I'll use the below method to stick sandpaper to each edge, allowing me 2 grits on the same tool.

Bio: Haven't played in 22yrs, just getting back into it. Mostly looking to build/repair than play.
Guitars: BC Rich Warlock, Agile AL-2000, Fender Squire SE (heavily modded), Washburn N2 (heavily modded)
Location: Zurich, ON (Canada)
#10
So, thinking about the sharpening stone idea, been reading in forums quite a few have done that option. Not wanting to go too cheap (ie. eBay China) or too short, but, Stanley makes an 8" one, medium and fine... should work?

http://www.homehardware.ca/en/rec/index.htm/Tools/Hand-Tools/Carpenter/Finish-Sharpen/Sharpen-Stones-Guide/3-Piece-Sharpening-Kit/_/N-ntlyeZ1z141y2/Ne-ntc74/No-96/R-I1074456?Num=0

For the ends/sides... I've been looking at various files, ones with grooved edges, diamond ones I can't afford, and the triangle shaped ones with rounded corners. The grooved edge ones seem to come narrow, medium or wide... I measured my frets on my Squier, 2.5mm, the narrow I think says 3mm but... not sure if that's right, I've seen frets narrower than these. 
Bio: Haven't played in 22yrs, just getting back into it. Mostly looking to build/repair than play.
Guitars: BC Rich Warlock, Agile AL-2000, Fender Squire SE (heavily modded), Washburn N2 (heavily modded)
Location: Zurich, ON (Canada)
Last edited by THRobinson at Sep 9, 2017,
#11
8" is about what I use.

Fret ends are trickier. I made a bevelling block similar to the Stewmac version:

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Types_of_Tools/Files/Fret_Beveling_File.html

I also use a small ceramic stone to take off the sharp corners, and polish with a hard leather disc  and metal polish in a dremel, with suitable protection for the edge of the fretboard.