#1
I'm having a few problems on my acoustic guitar the saddle is tilting forward to the headstock  ,   I got this guitar used its a semi acoustic it didn't come with a piezo pick up installed so I purchased one ,  It seems to me that the saddle is straight without the piezo pickup on but with the pickup in the bridge the saddle moves forward , So I think the saddle isn't going in to the bridge enough when I have the pickup in the bridge  .   Can anyone tell me what's the best way to make the slot deeper ?
#2
I did this - fitted an under-saddle pickup to an acoustic. I cut the bridge down (from the bottom, obviously) by the depth of the pickup (a couple of millimeters). This is far easier than trying to make the slot deeper.
#3
Quote by von Layzonfon
I did this - fitted an under-saddle pickup to an acoustic. I cut the bridge down (from the bottom, obviously) by the depth of the pickup (a couple of millimeters).  This is far easier than trying to make the slot deeper.

hi!  I have already lowed  the saddle don't think I could lower it anymore without the string hitting the frets .
#4
Do you think there's enough material to make the slot deeper?

And I suppose it would help to know exactly what we're talking about here. I have in mind a standard acoustic bridge, glued to the soundboard with a one-piece plastic or bone saddle sat in a slot.
I had to remove the saddle, drill a hole at the bottom of the slot to feed the pickup wire through, and cut down the height of the saddle to compensate for the pickup.

I don't know, but it sounds like your situation might be slightly different.
#5
well when I got the guitar it was more for a project it was cracked down the middle of the front of the guitar this is fixed  ,  I don't think I could make the slot  deeper as the slot looks deep already , I cant help thinking someone has sanded the top of the bridge reducing it or maybe it had a super thin pickup in the slot  , 
the strange thing is even with  the saddle tilted the guitar sounded  good ,   I had another crazy idea I was thinking about using wood filler to build up the bridge enough to stop the tilting  but again just don't know what else I could do .
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Sep 10, 2017,
#6
Quote by von Layzonfon
Do you think there's enough material to make the slot deeper?

And I suppose it would help to know exactly what we're talking about here. I have in mind a standard acoustic bridge, glued to the soundboard with a one-piece plastic or bone saddle sat in a slot.
I had to remove the saddle, drill a hole at the bottom of the slot to feed the pickup wire through, and cut down the height of the saddle to compensate for the pickup.

I don't know, but it sounds like your situation might be slightly different.

Its a standard acoustic  , glued ,  I really think the bridge  has been reduced at the top , I think someone has changed or re glued the  bridge  at some point maybe clamped it down to tight compressing the wood  . 
#7
As long s the bridge is stable once it's strung and tuned then it possibly isn't a problem, although the intonation might be compromised slightly, but that's never going to be spot on with a fixed bridge anyway.
#8
Quote by von Layzonfon
As long s the bridge is stable once it's strung and tuned then it possibly isn't a problem, although the intonation might be compromised slightly, but that's never going to be spot on with a fixed bridge anyway.

The Bridge is stable and as I said it sounds good I didn't check intonation I just tuned it up  , my worry was more could it damage the bridge over time with the saddle being tilted  .
#9
I've levelled the bottom of a slot, but making it deeper is a major operation. If you installed a piezo, then you raised the saddle, and it should be lowered in proportion if the action  was OK to begin with. I have a guitar with a shallow saddle slot, but it isn't a problem because the saddle is low and a good fit in the slot. You can get a tighter saddle fit by putting a shim in the slot alongside the saddle. I put them behind the saddle so they don't show as much.

I you lower the saddle, there might not be enough string break angle over it to make the piezo work properly, uneven output is a common symptom. This can be fixed by cutting ramps between the pin holes and the saddles:




That is my old Gibson, and it has a shallow saddle slot and low saddle. It used to have a UST, no problem, but I took it out in favour of a soundhole pickup.
#10
https://imgur.com/a/g0eGr
https://imgur.com/a/NQzUe
https://imgur.com/a/0qmOt
Quote by Tony Done
I've levelled the bottom of a slot, but making it deeper is a major operation. If you installed a piezo, then you raised the saddle, and it should be lowered in proportion if the action  was OK to begin with. I have a guitar with a shallow saddle slot, but it isn't a problem because the saddle is low and a good fit in the slot. You can get a tighter saddle fit by putting a shim in the slot alongside the saddle. I put them behind the saddle so they don't show as much.

I you lower the saddle, there might not be enough string break angle over it to make the piezo work properly, uneven output is a common symptom. This can be fixed by cutting ramps between the pin holes and the saddles:




That is my old Gibson, and it has a shallow saddle slot and low saddle. It used to have a UST, no problem, but I took it out in favour of a soundhole pickup.

https://imgur.com/a/g0eGr
https://imgur.com/a/NQzUe
https://imgur.com/a/0qmOt

The slot in the bridge it deep enough in fact without the piezo in the bridge  this saddle would be to low and the string would hit ,  I  decided to use some wood filler to make the bridge higher and create a shim effect , you can see from both sides that the one with the wood filler is more the height the bridge should be at ,  I am hoping this works in keeping the saddle from tilting .
#12
Quote by Tony Done
Yeah, that saddle is very high. It is unusual to see an old guitar with a good action and a high saddle. The way guitars deform with age, the saddle usually ends up too low.

this guitar is not old I got it for £40   sold as for  project as it  had been damaged and the guitar had been repaired although it wasn't perfect , the guitar doesn't sound bad and the action is spot on , but like you said the saddle is high   .  Do you think I should replace the bridge .
#13
dazzzer30 

I don't know about replacement, it might be hard to find one to match, and diy would involve cutting a saddle slot. An option that might work well on that bridge is to add a piece of wood to the whole of the flat top part. That would have the advantage of lifting the pins and reducing the very high break angle. The saddle slot would still be tricky though, unless you made the top out off more than one piece of wood.