#1
so i hooked my metal muff top boost up to my 6505+

kinda cool. distortion off on the pedal, just using it as a boost with the extra eq.

Ive had that pedal for ever, was gonna sell it but cant get much for it so decided I would try it.

Now the thing is, switching off and on, I think it colors it up more than I want.

Would I likely be happier with the min spark booster? I hear it more just boosts what you already got from the amp..........
#2
"Boosts what you already have from the amp" can be misleading. Boosting what you already have with a flat boost does not guarantee that the end result is going to be a louder, better version of your amp's sound. "Transparent" gets thrown around a lot but the whole idea is to get the amp to do something it wasn't doing before, so don't assume a flat clean boost is necessarily the right tool (though it's pretty often a good one). The type of amp matters a lot. With older Fender and Marshall designs, the preamp is often far from saturation, so you could throw a clean boost in front and get tons of extra breakup and it almost always sounds great. With your amp, there are way more gain stages, designed specifically to cascade a ton of distortion, so adding more in front can sometimes be tricky. Basically the 6505 design idea was to get tons of preamp saturation so you don't need pedals in front, using more tube gain stages the same way you'd put 2-3 OD pedals in front of a Fender or a Marshall. That doesn't mean you can't push it more, but keep that in mind, and think of how messy 4 gain pedals can get, when you're trying to boost a high-gain amp like the Peavey. It's just trickier, that's all. 

So it depends on what you want. I'd strongly suggest getting an EQ pedal instead of a clean boost. Even a little 6-band can give you a lot of great tone shaping options on top of just a flat boost to the front end of the amp. One of the problems with using a straight boost into an amp like the 6505 is that the preamp is already trying to squeeze out as much bass as it can, which means trying to boost the bass (with a flat boost) can just turn it into a flubby disaster. That's why a lot of people use a Tubescreamer type pedal with a bass cut into the 5150/6505. With an EQ, you don't have to decide, so if you want something that gives you the option of matching the boosted sound as much as possible to a louder, pushed version of your base tone, an EQ is a great first stop. 

Nothing wrong with a boost, and the Spark I'm sure is decent, but the MXR and Boss 6-band EQs are pretty cheap and give you all sorts of options that you'll never get with a one-knob boost. 
#3
Quote by Roc8995
"Boosts what you already have from the amp" can be misleading. Boosting what you already have with a flat boost does not guarantee that the end result is going to be a louder, better version of your amp's sound. "Transparent" gets thrown around a lot but the whole idea is to get the amp to do something it wasn't doing before, so don't assume a flat clean boost is necessarily the right tool (though it's pretty often a good one). The type of amp matters a lot. With older Fender and Marshall designs, the preamp is often far from saturation, so you could throw a clean boost in front and get tons of extra breakup and it almost always sounds great. With your amp, there are way more gain stages, designed specifically to cascade a ton of distortion, so adding more in front can sometimes be tricky. Basically the 6505 design idea was to get tons of preamp saturation so you don't need pedals in front, using more tube gain stages the same way you'd put 2-3 OD pedals in front of a Fender or a Marshall. That doesn't mean you can't push it more, but keep that in mind, and think of how messy 4 gain pedals can get, when you're trying to boost a high-gain amp like the Peavey. It's just trickier, that's all. 

So it depends on what you want. I'd strongly suggest getting an EQ pedal instead of a clean boost. Even a little 6-band can give you a lot of great tone shaping options on top of just a flat boost to the front end of the amp. One of the problems with using a straight boost into an amp like the 6505 is that the preamp is already trying to squeeze out as much bass as it can, which means trying to boost the bass (with a flat boost) can just turn it into a flubby disaster. That's why a lot of people use a Tubescreamer type pedal with a bass cut into the 5150/6505. With an EQ, you don't have to decide, so if you want something that gives you the option of matching the boosted sound as much as possible to a louder, pushed version of your base tone, an EQ is a great first stop. 

Nothing wrong with a boost, and the Spark I'm sure is decent, but the MXR and Boss 6-band EQs are pretty cheap and give you all sorts of options that you'll never get with a one-knob boost. 

what models of the boss and mxr, thanks for your time and your nice write up. on my amp i leave the pre gain around 5-6 normaly.
Last edited by SUDJIAN at Sep 14, 2017,