#1
Okay so I already play a lot and I mean a lot of John Mayers electric stuff and his acoustic stuff. I've been playing for about 4 years and now have realized that John mayer is all I know how to play lol. Any tips for songs to learn just for when people want me to play guitar for them? To give them songs they know so they aren't confused when I start playing only John mayer 😂?
#4
How many campfires are you hanging around?  

Just learn some songs, if you're doing it for your friends I guess that depends on the music they like.  My suggestion, learn songs you like.  If you find yourself at a campfire and you want to play, pick and sing what you want.  
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#5
tate.givans

1) Find an acousuc small enough to take with you that you wouldn't be too fussed about if it got damaged, destroyed or lost.

2) Learn popular singalong songs. Whatever is popular in your group right now is a good place to start. There are also all kinds of books of songs you can find in music stores or used book stores with titles like: "Great American Songbook", "Hits of the 70s", "Boy Scout Jamboree Songs", "Best of James Taylor", etc.

3) look for videos of songs that have been covered a lot of times, especially acoustic/a capella covers, like Cohen's "Hallelujah" or "Somewhere over the rainbow".
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Wagon Wheel
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
Acoustic versions of prince songs for the campfires with the ladies 
"I definitely don’t write all my music in a blackout, like I used to, although I did come up with some good stuff in a blackout."
-Matt Fucking Pike
#8
Quote by Badluckpalms
Acoustic versions of prince songs for the campfires with the ladies 


I know just the one.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
Quote by tate.givans
Any tips for songs to learn just for when people want me to play guitar for them?

Before the campfire, ask the people what songs or artists they would like to hear or sing along to. Every group of people will have different age ranges, backgrounds, tastes. Some music just doesn't work at the campfire on a single acoustic guitar. I have a folder of 200+ popular songs covering 60's - current and I add more every year (from UG of course). I let people flick through and pull out what they would like to hear. I then decide what I actually feel like playing and will be of most interest. There are some classics that seem to come out every time.

You could take random requests, do a quick look up on UG using a laptop or iPad, and then try to bluff your way though a song you have heard a few times, but never tried to play right through or sing. This has worked for me, but I've also had a quite a few fails.

Unless you have a bunch of out-going singers, you need to be able to sing yourself. Most people just want to listen, or won't join in unless someone is taking a lead. This is a good way to force you to improve your own singing.

By "campfire", I mean any informal social occasion, such as a few friends having a drink, pool party, beach, BBQ etc.
Last edited by gbaddeley at Sep 24, 2017,
#10
Campfire singing your going to want to learn the chords of as many songs as you can.. The hard part is learning all the lyrics to the songs.. You really need to have it all down to memory, it just isn't as good when someone has to read the tab while they play. Build up a repertoire of 40 or 50 songs and you can play all night long. Obviously you want to focus on well known and catchy songs. I'd focus on a lot of classics from to 60s to 80s but the song choice will depend on the age of the audience
#11
Quote by babysmasher
Campfire singing your going to want to learn the chords of as many songs as you can.. The hard part is learning all the lyrics to the songs.. You really need to have it all down to memory, it just isn't as good when someone has to read the tab while they play. ..

Even if you know the tabs and lyrics quite well, its good to have them printed out. 1/ So that you can remind yourself and make less mistakes. 2/ So people can read the lyrics. You would be surprised at the number of well known songs where other people can sing the chorus with gusto but struggle with the verses. 3/ So other guitarists can play along too.

It isn't as impressive as playing everything from memory, but I don't think anyone will think any less of you if you have a folder of tabs on the table. This is not a professional gig. No one has any particular expectations, other than having a good time.
#12
Quote by gbaddeley
By "campfire", I mean any informal social occasion, such as a few friends having a drink, pool party, beach, BBQ etc.


Singing Home on the Range, Wagon Wheel, and Oh, Susanna around an actual campfire on an actual camping trip is clichéd and goofy but it's fun and acceptable. Playing guitar at other solo gatherings is pretty douchey unless you're the actual band that was asked to perform and not some random goof that showed up with a guitar. Now, if you show up randomly with like a hurdy-gurdy or something, that's perfectly fine.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#13
theogonia777 

I cringe whenever someone asks me to play at something other than a specifically-musical gathering, because the only one genuinely interested is me. If they want background noise they can do worse than choose a Youtube mix. However,  I have been known to sit in a corner and play to avoid conversation.

A somewhat similar thread is currently open in the Acoustic subforum about musical suitable for a mature beginner. A couple of us thought that songs from the folk boom and blues revival beginning in the early '60s would be a good choice. Most of it is fairly easy and good for singalongs. It is still pretty much the only kind of thing I play.
#14
Quote by theogonia777
Singing Home on the Range, Wagon Wheel, and Oh, Susanna around an actual campfire on an actual camping trip is clichéd and goofy but it's fun and acceptable.  

I was thinking more along the lines of Hotel California, American Pie, Angie, Hey Jude, House of the Rising Sun, Wild Thing, Wish You Were Here, Brown Eyed Girl, Lola, etc. than folky or traditional songs.
#15
Quote by Tony Done
A somewhat similar thread is currently open in the Acoustic subforum about musical suitable for a mature beginner. A couple of us thought that songs from the folk boom and blues revival beginning in the early '60s would be a good choice. Most of it is fairly easy and good for singalongs. It is still pretty much the only kind of thing I play.

Credence Clearwater Revival and Cat Stevens have lots of songs that are well known, easy to play and great to sing along. 
Last edited by gbaddeley at Sep 25, 2017,
#16
Quote by gbaddeley
I was thinking more along the lines of Hotel California, American Pie, Angie, Hey Jude, House of the Rising Sun, Wild Thing, Wish You Were Here, Brown Eyed Girl, Lola, etc. than folky or traditional songs.


It doesn't matter what songs you play. Showing up to a party with your guitar is lame.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#17
Quote by theogonia777
It doesn't matter what songs you play.  Showing up to a party with your guitar is lame.

Yeah, that could be lame. My "campfire" playing experience is where I know everyone there, and they know I play guitar. If I didn't bring it, they would probably ask "where's your guitar?" but it wouldn't really fuss them, they would respect that.