#1
Hey all,

I'm planning to buy a new guitar. The first one I got turned out to be kinda small for me. After an hour of playing I always get back pains since I have to lean down to play it. Even with a foot rest. What I have now is this one:

http://www.tanglewoodguitars.co.uk/product/dbtsfcebw/

I'm planning to get a dreadnought because they are a bit bigger in the weist which gives them a bit more height. I went and tried some at music shops but they still feel somewhat small to me. For example, I liked this one:

http://www.takamine.com/GD30CE-BLK

Is this the biggest size a dreadnought guitar can have? Can you maybe suggest big guitars in general? There's always Jumbo guitars but they are out of my budget for now.

Thanks
#2
How tall are you?

If you find a dread too small, you might want to look at your posture and other alternatives for getting the guitar in a comfortable position, like a strap, or a pad or stand that goes between your knee and the guitar. Paco Pena does this to keep his guitar in the flamenco position.

Last edited by Tony Done at Sep 20, 2017,
#3
A jumbo shouldn't be much, if any more expensive than a decent dreadnaught. The Epiphone EJ-200 is a popular dread that's pretty affordable.
#5
Captaincranky 


Hmm. The narrow waist on a jumbo might be even less comfortable than a dread. I'm wondering why there is a problem at all. - Most problems are due to guitars being too big, not too small.

Just had a thought - one way to make a guitar bigger (well, deeper) is to add an armrest.
#6
Tony Done Renaissance used to do that "stand trick", while standing. Albeit not for the same reason. They had their acoustics mounted on stands, (Ovations at the time, if you must know), so they didn't have to drop their electrics. or strap on a guitar after playing a keyboard.

Then, Annie Haslam, in a diaphanous white gown, (no slip), would stand in front of a 500 watt, floor mounted spotlight, spread her legs, and belt out, "Carpet of the Sun". What a glorious ...voice.
#8
Tony Done White dress, no spotlight, it's from Brit TV......



I found some later stuff, But Annie wore about as well as Linda Ronstadt or Stevie Nicks, or somewhat as well....
#10
Tony Done And speaking of "not wearing well", Here's a name which should be familiar to you, Christine Keeler:



To try to keep this on topic, I bet those low ridin' big ole gals would pretty much knock any size guitar off her lap.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2401524/Former-model-Christine-Keeler-71-unrecognisable-50-years-Profumo-affair.html
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 21, 2017,
#12
Tony Done Granted this is 14 years old, but there's that big guitar.....



She's got a slew of those things! Here she is with a black one:



At any rate, unfortunately Emmy is in a tie with Dolly Parton, and the undisputed queen of annoying female country singers, Allison Krauss, for most grating and screechy female vocalists of all time.

That said, here's 2+ octaves of the wonderful, Martina McBride. (No big guitar though, sorry. But check out the big guitar, on the girl playing rhythm).



Moving on with our, "sopranos with big guitars treatise", Here's Suzy Boggus with a gigantic maple Guild sixer! (And a double neck pedal guitar for good measure).



Sweet f***ing Contralto relief, and in waltz time, no less: Mary-Chapin Carpenter with her song, "Slow Country Dance". (She does play a big guitar, I saw it with may own eyes, live). Don't really think she gets too much over E4 here. Sorry, make that F#4.



Ah, found it!



The young lady has 3 rhythm guitars going! She hasn't discovered that one 12 string and a delay unit would mostly take care of this. (along with a crap load of reverb)
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 21, 2017,
#13
Well I am 187 cm tall if that helps you all and since I’m learning acoustic guitar, I can’t use those stands which are meant for classical guitars. I’m trying to fix my posture but after a while I find myself leaning down again.
#14
Have you ever considered using a strap even when you play seated?  It might help...

What size is the waist and upper bout of a superfolk?  It looks like some sort of mini jumbo which can be bigger than a dread but I'm not sure because I couldn't find a size guide or measurements on the tanglewood site.
Not taking any online orders.
#16
Here is a video of me playing. It’s an old one, I’m not that bad now :p :p You can see how it looks in other videos in my channel as well
#17
CorduroyEWbtw I never considered using a strap while sitting. I think I tried in the past but the guitar isn’t steady enough as when sitting on my leg. I know all this sounds stupid though...
#18
Quote by yiannis_anastasiou
CorduroyEW Its waist is 22.5 cm

Then it isn't a mini jumbo like I thought.   Most dreads will be nearly 3" wider at the waist than your super folk.  I wouldn't look for the largest dread you can find.  Just look for something that sounds good.

If you are happy with the sound of your current guitar or want to save money try playing with a strap for a couple weeks.  Don't bother trying to keep the guitar on your leg, or perhaps cross your legs when you play if you feel like the guitar needs support. 
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#19
CorduroyEW I would really consider your advise but I have other reasons to get a new one as well. Better sound, bigger sound hole so that I can use a cover when recording... So ok, I might get that Takamine that I liked and try using a strap as well.
#20
CorduroyEW This guy’s dread looks big too me but don’t know if he is just short. That’s a Martin I guess but can’t figure out the model.

Last edited by yiannis_anastasiou at Sep 21, 2017,
#21
Quote by yiannis_anastasiou
CorduroyEW This guy’s dread looks big too me but don’t know if he is just short. That’s a Martin I guess but can’t figure out the model.
]
First off, named guitar sizes pretty close to standard across the industry, you're going to have to get used to it. As you've been shown, even small women find ways of dealing with the largest acoustic bodies on the market. (And got to hear a lot of excellent music in the process).

So how about if put the brakes on this, and suggest that it's incumbent upon you to learn deal with whats available, rather than the guitar companies humor you, by releasing a, "monumental grandiferous double super jumbo with a dreadnought waist". Plan "B", would be to have someone build you a humongous guitar, but even that fails, since the luthier would have to build jigs to accommodate the entirely new size. Lo cual costaria muy mucho

Plan "C", would be to take up the "Bajo Sexto":



Try not to consider this a rude or superfluous post, and don't worry about keying in on my screen name. Consider this post a long overdue, "reality check"!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 21, 2017,
#24
Quote by yiannis_anastasiou
Captaincrankydon’t worry man I just laughed l know that my question is stupid somehow and I expected comments like yours
Finally, someone understands me...!
#26
I still don't think that the size of the guitar is the problem. Your posture is very similar to mine, but I don't lean forwards to look at the strings as you do. Have you tried the classical position, with the waist of the guitar on your left knee and the neck pointing upwards at an angle? That might solve your back problem. I sometimes used to do it at the start of a gig, to avoid cramping up through nerves.
#27
yiannis_anastasiou Not to belabor the point about the bajo sexto, but take note how the player has it angled away from him. I do the same thing when I play sitting down. That doesn't seem as if it would be 'intimate enough' for live performance, but it does force me to sit straight up, and strum across the face of the guitar.

Something else you should be aware of, is the angle of your 'guitar leg', in relation to the floor. At 5' 9", my leg is higher at the hip, than at the knee. I swear that one of these days, I'm going to construct a purpose built footstool, to raise my knee, which would prevent the guitar from sliding down my leg, when I angle it out.. At your height, your knees should be well above the level of the chair seat. You should be gold in that respect. If that;s not the case, then you could also use something to raise that leg a bit. For each of us, that height will be dependent on our individual stature. A wild guesstimate, says that my stool would need to be nearly double the height which would serve you..

Also, the face of the stool would need to be angled, higher on the far side than the near Here again, that angle would have to mesh with an ankle angle that gives you the most comfort.

Something else to consider, is to be aware of what and where you tend to tense up while playing, and learn to either relax, or take a break.

You do know you're not supposed to look at your fingers while you play, right? Otherwise, you'll never be able to amaze and astound an audience by playing the guitar while holding it behind you neck! (Said the man who has to look at every key he hits while typing).

To recap:

1: We're going to try angling the bottom of the guitar away from you.

2: We're going to determine the exact amount of lift your leg needs to be raised off the floor (On the leg you hold the guitar).

3: We're going to try to determine the precise angle of the step, which places your foot at the most comfortable angle to your leg. (About 60 to 70 degrees would likely be ideal. A true right angle is too severe and uncomfortable).


Something you've vastly exaggerated, is how much the height difference between individuals, affects their relationship to the size of the guitar.

Taller people tend to have dis-proportionally longer arms and particularly legs. Briefly, the distance between the top of the leg and the armpit,(when seated), comprises only a portion of the height differential between them. In other words, if one person is 5' 6" and another is 6', there simply won't be a 6" difference in the distance from the top of their legs to their armpits. (And no, I'm not converting those measurements to the metric system)..

Where there is a big difference, is often in the length of the fingers, and there, the advantage goes to the tall guys.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 22, 2017,
#29
CaptaincrankyThanks for you detailed reply!! Just a heads up, just bought the takamine and fell in love with it. It is bigger than my previous one and I can now try to fix my posture. I can play the guitar while sitting straight with not such efford as before! I’ll be taking into great consideration everything you said. Just a commend on your first point, I noticed that if the bottom of the guitar is a bit away from my, I tend to mute the strings while playing. So I try to have it as straight as possible.
#30
Play sitting straight, your back straight, body facing forward and slightly turned left. Guitar should be on your right lap.

If you have to look at the fretboard to make chords, don't lean forward, but instead maintain the body posture, tilt your head *slightly* forward. If needed, tilt the guitar inwards towards you a little (2 or 3 degrees) so your line of sight- in a straight posture and slightly tilted head, allows you to see the fretboard.

Hunching over the guitar or leaning too far forward is not healthy in the long run.

Goodluck! And Taks are pretty dang good so i hope you enjoy beating the nuts out of yours for years to come
#31
Play sitting straight, your back straight, body facing forward and slightly turned left. Guitar should be on your right lap. Yeah, some players recommend you put the guitar on the opposite leg. But if you've never done it that way, it's quite awkward, and you feel like you're chasing the fret board. Classical players do it that way, for a number of good reason, and perhaps a little bit of being stuffy as well, thrown in for good measure,. You do get greatly expanded access to the upper frets, but like ?I sais, if you've never done it that way, it feels like you're "chasing the guitar

Quote by AORNova
If you have to look at the fretboard to make chords, don't lean forward, but instead maintain the body posture, tilt your head *slightly* forward. If needed, tilt the guitar inwards towards you a little (2 or 3 degrees) so your line of sight- in a straight posture and slightly tilted head, allows you to see the fretboard.
I did cover that pretty well @ post #27. I extend the guitar bottom our further than a couple of degrees, and strum down and out across the face of the guitar, and have taken to using the rear bout of my EJ-200s as arm rest, and basically limiting my pivoting while strumming, to just the elbow.

Quote by AORNova
Hunching over the guitar or leaning too far forward is not healthy in the long run.
Well, I've seen many guitarists with a permanent slouch, and rounded shoulders, from wrapping themselves around the instrument. The net effect is almost the same as that, "too tall girl in your school", who slouches while leaning forward and wrapping herself around her books to make herself appear shorter As they, and guitar players, grow a bit older, the slouch becomes permanent as their bones harden into adulthood.


To sum this diatribe up, any twisting id detrimental, and you'll start developing muscle issues on the side way from any activity, My neck muscles get strained quite a bit on the left side, from constantly using a computer mouse, and those operation.s are carried on with the right hand.

Slouching then, is very often present in a guitar player's posture. Although I don't do it anywhere nears enough in my old age, standing up to play from time to time, That mitigates some of the slouching, and allows better access to the upper frets, than either one of the seated positions

I have a habit of sitting on the floor cross legged. Let me tell you, that was fine and dandy when I was 20, it's a position which I find is a lot harder to get out of, when you're pushing 70.

Our bodies do unfortunately become, "pleasure bent" from doing the things we enjoy, (and also plenty of those we don't ).

Anecdotally, one of my girlfriends over the years, had one o "the girls", (the right one), which pointed dramatically off to the side, while the other was dead center, at attention. That left me scratching my head for a couple of years at to what caused it.

Then it hit me, she was a very bright girl, and thus carried a ton of books to class from a very young age. Well, I'm reasonably certain those ribs of hers were molded over the years, since bones are very pliable, until we get into at least our late teens and early twenties. Nobody really used backpacks back then, which would have been ideal to lessen the load on the right side of her rib cage, And hopefully, pulled her shoulders back a bit.

Making music is hard work. Which is the cover bands get 15 of twenty minutes off per hour at your local neighborhood. To unwind, and get off their feet for a while. Well, either that, or to short more coke, so they could put up a really lively next set
#32
Quote by Tony Done
Captaincranky


Hmm. The narrow waist on a jumbo might be even less comfortable than a dread. I'm wondering why there is a problem at all. - Most problems are due to guitars being too big, not too small.

Just had a thought - one way to make a guitar bigger (well, deeper) is to add an armrest.

Jumbo's don't have a narrow waist.  They have bigger shoulders and hips which makes the waist look smaller by comparison.
Not taking any online orders.