#1
So, the title speaks for itself i suppose. I understand that a 12" has more bass response than a 8". So, what about 4x8? I guess it's louder, but is it louder than a 1x12 if the wattage is equal? Does the lack of bass still exist in 4x8? What is your preference and experience?
#2
Quote by kolokol220
So, the title speaks for itself i suppose. I understand that a 12" has more bass response than a 8". 

In a very oversimplified and generalized sense, yes. But there is a shopping list of other things that also affect to bass reproduction. There's more to it than just speaker diameter.
So, what about 4x8? I guess it's louder, but is it louder than a 1x12 if the wattage is equal? 

No, that's not how speakers work. More speakers in a cabinet does not mean that it'll be louder.

A more accurate measure (although still a very simplified one measured at a fixed frequency under highly controlled conditions) of a speaker's loudness is it's sensitivity. Sensitivity is the measure of the maximum loudness of a speaker at a fixed frequency under just 1 watt of power. The individual wattage of each speaker is not necessarily a measure of its loudness either. Case-in-point, a Celestion V30 is a 60 watt RMS speaker with a sensitivity of 100db, while the Celestion G12T-75 has a lower sensitivity of 97db at 1 watt of power despite it the cone being the same diameter, and having a higher RMS power rating of 75 watts. Despite it having higher power handling, it's actually a quieter speaker. Weird huh?

Note that these measurements were taken while the speakers were driven with just 1 watt of power. Yet a Vintage 30 is still able to kick out 100db of sound pressure. If you were standing right next to a speaker that was chucking out 100db of sound pressure, you'd bloody know about it. All of this illustrates the point that the RMS wattage of speakers is very misleadingly marketed, causing people to do not understand enough about the subject to make a lot of false assumptions as to what those numbers actually mean in the real world. And the question that you're asking in the OP is full of those false assumptions.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 14, 2017,
#3
T00DEEPBLUE speakith thy truth.

I don't like 8" speakers for guitar. The exception would be a Jensen With a 5e3 or 5f1.
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#6
ExDementia

Exactly. I have used guitar combos with 10" speakers and I don't get how much people say they lack bass. Cuz they don't!

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#8
Quote by diabolical
I don't like smaller than 12 inch speakers on guitar in general. Have one amp with 10 inch Celestion (Orange TT combo) and that's fine for that amp in general 12 inch is the golden rule for a reason.

I had that exact combo, it never needed a 12" speaker IMO. I also had a Laney LC15R for many years, sounded very good as well. 

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#9
I never owned a 4x8. I do have a 1x12 can that I've used for 8 years. It's true more bass and more of a fuller sound to my ears.

I would image a 4x8 would be more useful for a large open space venues, I've played in small halls and my 1x12 is perfect. Also wattage comes into play, it's easier to break down wattage into 4 speakers rather than squeeze it all into one. As far as time, I couldn't tell ya, but for my taste and gear, I'd take a 1x12 unless I'm somewhere outside and in front of a huge 20,000+ crowd
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#10
Quote by diabolical
I don't like smaller than 12 inch speakers on guitar in general. Have one amp with 10 inch Celestion (Orange TT combo) and that's fine for that amp in general 12 inch is the golden rule for a reason.


i agree. i almost think that it has to do more with the way the speakers are designed and tradition. you see Marshall stacks in the 60's loaded with 12" speakers. so us stubborn ass guitarists stick with traditional, so we still use them.

there are very little restriction to diameter regarding speakers. my bass rig is a 2x10 1x15 and a tweeter.sounds great.

lets see if dspellman will pop on in. he uses alternative rigs.
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alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


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youre just being a jerk man.



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#11
Quote by diabolical
I don't like smaller than 12 inch speakers on guitar in general. Have one amp with 10 inch Celestion (Orange TT combo) and that's fine for that amp in general 12 inch is the golden rule for a reason.


12 inch is the golden rule, but not for any reason related to sound.

It's been simpler and cheaper for manufacturers to standardize on one size, and they've managed to convince guitarists that it's traditional (and lord knows, guitarists worship at the altar of "traditional"). Bass players, on the other hand, will play through anything from 15 (sometimes 18) inch through 5" (Phil Jones cabinets) and they'll include 1" tweeters in the mix. And they'll get real, solid, low bass frequency output through them all.

Guitar players listen with their eyes, sometimes (okay, often). The problem with that (for guitarists, not for me) is that they limit themselves. I practice through a set of KRK Rokit 8's -- they're mid-range studio monitors with an 8" LF driver and a tweeter. They've got a built in biamped amp that pushes about 75W to the LF driver and 25W to the highs. They'll reproduce lows down into the 35 Hz range and highs up well past 20Khz (actually, I think they claim 35Khz). http://www.krksys.com/krk-studio-monitor-speakers/rokit/rokit-8.html Their max output is around 109dB. With most 12" speakers capable of only around 100Hz to around 4500Hz, it's the 12" speakers that sound like AM radio by comparison. Guitar is *capable* of a wider range than 100-4500Hz. Well designed acoustic amps often feature LF drivers in closed-back, ported cabinets with tweeters for a reason. The KRKs also have available 10" and 12" subwoofers to extend and emphasize that bass range, but those 12" subs feature 400W amps (pushing up to 123 dB) and begin around 29Hz and stop (usually) around 60Hz (up to 160Hz if required when you're using 5" monitors). I run a modeler through these speakers (as well as keys and even a bass occasionally), and in a small/medium size room, it's fun to watch other guitar players' faces. Especially those who believe that a 12" speaker is the "golden rule."

The same goes for live performance or recording. If you run a guitar direct into the mixer, there's a lot more sonic information available there than if you mike a 12" speaker an inch off the voice coil edge. Same goes for a modeler into a mixer. You may *want* just some mids emphasized for solo work, but if you're running a 7 or an 8 and want the bottom end to show up with clarity, most 12" guitar speakers aren't up to the task, and miking the usual 12" isn't going to get you there.