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Zamboni
is moist.
Join date: Jul 2003
2,792 IQ
#1
I'm sure this is an issue on many bandleader's minds, and I intend to answer it with this thread.

If you're wondering what order you should play your certain styles of songs in, be it fast-paced ones, ballads, or other such genres, continue reading:

  • The First Song

    You should always try to start your set with a relatively up-beat song. This serves two purposes: It allows you to release some of your pent-up, pre-show energy, as well as getting the crowd into it right from the get-go.

  • The Middle of Your Set

    Here you have a bit of leeway. You can choose to continue with the up-beat songs, or vary it and throw in a slower-paced song or even a ballad here and there. A good rule of thumb to follow is to end the middle of your set with a relatively slower song. This calms your crowd down a bit and lets them settle into a groove where they're not constantly rocking out, but also just chilling.

  • The End of Your Set

    OK, now we're wrapping up your set. You always want to end off on a high note, and this is done by following the pattern of your first songs and playing something fun, fast, and preferably memorable. Covers work well in these situations. You can lead up to your last song with a slower one, but definitely leave the crowd on a high by playing something up-beat.

  • Your Encore

    Assuming the crowd enjoyed your set, you may be asked for an encore. In contrast to your first and last songs, an encore generally demands a ballad or slower-type song. This is especially effective if you are the last band to play. This, once again, calms the crowd down and seems to complete the concert for them.

    edit: Alternatively, kick their ass and rock out even harder to play yourselves out.


Take from these guidlines what you will, and hopefully your next show will be a great one.

-Mike
Last edited by axemanchris at Aug 22, 2009,
FenderStrat1337
Unregistered User
Join date: Jul 2004
439 IQ
#2
sticky?

Great advice btw
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SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
Join date: Aug 2004
627 IQ
#3
Good ideas laid out there. Good job on that.

One thing I would change though, is I like to end the set on a memorable song; it doesn't have to be fast or up-beat or anything. Something memorable in the performance of it, or just the song itself - be it a cover or an original - as long as it's memorable, that's what counts.

Other than that though, I agree with everything you said, good job.
raph8r
UG's Mellow Fellow
Join date: Dec 2004
29 IQ
#5
great idea, i would also add that your last song or your encore whichever one should be some sort of jam song where it goes on for awhile and each group member can kind of improvise (assuming they can) some sort of solo or something...i dunno just my 2 cents
I once stabbed a man for stealing my cake, and I don't even like cake.
socialtool
Bored with Sex
Join date: Dec 2002
171 IQ
#6
Quote by raph8r
great idea, i would also add that your last song or your encore whichever one should be some sort of jam song where it goes on for awhile and each group member can kind of improvise (assuming they can) some sort of solo or something...i dunno just my 2 cents


I don't completely agree, for some bands a song can go on for far too long, so if you are talented enought o jam, then you can try it, but I really think it's bettter if you stick with some a bit rehearsd because you have less of a chance of screwing up and you don't want that to be thing everyone remembers.

I agree that generally it needs to be a song that is hard hitting. It needs to have a sense of closure, you want the crowd to have an emotional orgasm wth you. It's just like sex. (Now I know many of you don't have much experience in this but after a good set, you can get some more lol)

Only end with a cover if you do a good- make that great- job. I mean I saw a band that was a good band, and then they ended with an attrocity of Bohemian Rhapsody and for the first few weeks every time someone asked me about them, I was like they suck! Even though most of the set was good, that last song stuck out in my mind.
I listen to music and I don't need your opinions about what I listen to.
KENZI
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2004
105 IQ
#8
Quote by raph8r
great idea, i would also add that your last song or your encore whichever one should be some sort of jam song where it goes on for awhile and each group member can kind of improvise (assuming they can) some sort of solo or something...i dunno just my 2 cents


a jam would be good in a set if the band can jam and improvise well, but i think the jam section would be better placed in the middle of the show and then brought back to something familiar that people know and recognise. Like some of Led Zeppelin's live music.
Universe is infinite, time is not, use both space and time with wise consideration.

Quote by Steve Cropper
. A powerchord is like ripping the expensive hardwood floor out of a room. The room still serves its purpose but dosen't look as nice. Unless you like carpet.
SilentDeftone
UG God
Join date: Jul 2003
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#9
Quote by Zamboni
Hey Joshy, a sticky would be nice.

A little expanding would be nice too Maybe cover more than just this one subject? I don't know that much about gigs etc. so I wouldn't be a great choice for writing a FAQ.

-SD
SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
Join date: Aug 2004
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#10
General Gigging Tips


1) Stage Prescence: Until you make it big and famous - and even then - this is one of the most important things whilst gigging. Move around the stage when you can, make sure you can feel the music and groove to it and, most importantly, enjoy yourself. Performing is a two-way system; the audience feeds off of the bands' energy and the band in return gets a confidence boost from the audience who are feeling the music and grooving to it. If a band is not - or at least does not seem to be - enjoying themselves on stage, then the audience, generally speaking, will feel the tension and won't get into the music as much as you'd like them to.
It is also important, because, as much as music is an audio experience, it is also a visual experience. An audience - as much as the musicians may like them to - will not just listen to the music, but watch the music. This can be traced back to the pyschadelic-era in particular, when light shows were a prominent feature during bands' performance. However, seeing as this isn't the late 60s/early 70s anymore, and not many people (if any) use light shows and - albeit to a lesser extent - smoke machines and shadows and whatnot, the band become the visual experience of the music. However great the music may be, if the band just stand around like a bunch of lemons, it will end up being quite an unenjoyable experience. Whereas, to see a band headbanging, or if the music doesn't suit, just grooving about or moving around the stage and interacting with other band members and using elevated areas and whatnot, then the band becomes a more enjoyable visual experience.

2) Crowd Interaction: If you're playing a set with three or more songs, crowd interaction becomes quite important. Introducing the group, the individual members of the band and the names of the songs before/after you play them are the basics. This at least lets the crowd have some connection to the band. To indulge further, a singer could do a crowd dive (incredibly egotistical and not always well-recieved, but fun if it works), the guitarist (leads permitting) could wander out into the crowd whilst playing a solo or even just rhythm parts etc. Slightly less on the extreme side, perhaps a story behind a song, or a bit of banter with the crowd - usually jokes or telling them how great the venue/town is are good - or letting the crowd sings parts of a well-known song, or possibly a call and response type thing with the crowd.

3) Keep ego's in check: One of the single most important things to remember whilst playing a gig. Unless your guitarist can run around stage, and backflip, and play with his teeth or behind his neck or something that's very interesting to watch, don't let him or her solo for hours - people will get bored of it. This mainly applies to the lead guitarist, but lead vocalists can get can pretty full of themselves too. Try and make sure that everyone is included as equally as possible, and while in some instances it's a good thing to show off a particular talent within the group, be sure not to let that one thing overshadow the rest of the band.

4) Keep the set interesting: Again, important. Make sure to try and play a diversity of songs, but try and keep it within a set range. It would be very weird if you opened with a death metal song, and then went straight into a powerful blues piece. But, if you were to start with a relatively slow-paced rock song, and then play a blues song, it wouldn't be too much of a shock to the system. Make sure to splice your set up with originals and covers - but, importantly, make sure the covers are relatively well known and whatever happens, play them as perfectly as you possibly can! One of worst things you can do is to mess up a cover song.
Along with diversity with songs, crowd interaction comes into keeping a set interesting. See above for some breif advice on this.

5) Set-up: Make sure everybody knows what they need and what they're doing beforehand. Then make sure all cables, batteries, amps, strings, guitars etc. are in tune and working properly, or at least working the way you want/need them to. I suppose this is a good place to include this: rehearse as much as physically possible. You can never over-learn material, so practice as much as you can before you go to play the gig; it can only be beneficial.

6) Roboticism: Comes into the whole stage prescence thing, but anywho. Don't be a bunch of robots. Don't just play through the stuff robotically; enjoy it, and - not too much, but enough to keep it different and interesting - try to improvise when and where it's possible. If you can improvise well, this will be almost second nature anyway, and to those who can't improvise really well, then even some basic improvising will make your part - and the set as a whole - seem so much more interesting.

Choosing which songs to perform:

Quote by Zamboni


  • The First Song

    You should always try to start your set with a relatively up-beat song. This serves two purposes: It allows you to release some of your pent-up, pre-show energy, as well as getting the crowd into it right from the get-go.

  • The Middle of Your Set

    Here you have a bit of leeway. You can choose to continue with the up-beat songs, or vary it and throw in a slower-paced song or even a ballad here and there. A good rule of thumb to follow is to end the middle of your set with a relatively slower song. This calms your crowd down a bit and lets them settle into a groove where they're not constantly rocking out, but also just chilling.

  • The End of Your Set

    OK, now we're wrapping up your set. You always want to end off on a high note, and this is done by following the pattern of your first songs and playing something fun, fast, and preferably memorable. Covers work well in these situations. You can lead up to your last song with a slower one, but definitely leave the crowd on a high by playing something up-beat.

  • Your Encore

    Assuming the crowd enjoyed your set, you may be asked for an encore. In contrast to your first and last songs, an encore generally demands a ballad or slower-type song. This is especially effective if you are the last band to play. This, once again, calms the crowd down and seems to complete the concert for them.


Take from these guidlines what you will, and hopefully your next show will be a great one.

-Mike


Happy gigging folks.
redteamleader
tab this, suckah.
Join date: Jan 2006
127 IQ
#11
the only thing i could possibly add: practice

before your gig be sure and run your set for time- make sure you're within the set time you've been given. further, the pre-gig rehearsal is a good time to make sure all the sticky bits and tricky parts are coming off smoothly.

more than anything make sure you're prepared. your band's act isn't going to matter much if your songs aren't polished and ready to be played for people- no amount of stage presence is going to make up for a ****ty set. better to play a short, tight set than a long, sloppy, ill-prepared one.
KENZI
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2004
105 IQ
#12
Quote by redteamleader
no amount of stage presence is going to make up for a ****ty set. better to play a short, tight set than a long, sloppy, ill-prepared one.


no way!

its al about balencing between technique and tightness and stage presence. you need both for an excellent gig. if either one fails then its not going to go as well as it could, of course maxing out both is the ideal solution but neither should be lacking.
Universe is infinite, time is not, use both space and time with wise consideration.

Quote by Steve Cropper
. A powerchord is like ripping the expensive hardwood floor out of a room. The room still serves its purpose but dosen't look as nice. Unless you like carpet.
rathmusbass
UG Freak
Join date: Feb 2005
660 IQ
#13
from playing a few shows i learned something. a good idea is to always play to a crowd that likes your genre. it sucks playing nu-metal in front of old grannies or playing death metal to a bunch of teens that have hardcore boners for amy lee

also some more tips for your set list....

dont play songs back-to-back that are in the same key or have very similar rhythms.

Usually if you start out with an easy song it makes the entire set flow better, because by the end of that you will have a feel of the show already.

if your entire band does not have everything down for every song then do not play the songs that you all can not play well, or dont play a gig until then.

=-p =-)
" Not usin g this account anymore. Now using " SOA_Bassist "

=-p =-)
Last edited by rathmusbass at Jan 10, 2006,
mangablade
UG Spammer
Join date: Apr 2005
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#14
Quote by redteamleader
no amount of stage presence is going to make up for a ****ty set. better to play a short, tight set than a long, sloppy, ill-prepared one.



i never thought id do this but...


what about greenday? ****ty band imo, but you have to admit, wether or not the music is good, at concerts they can get the crowd goin (i watched 10 mins of a live show) and they interact with the audience and everything. Do i think they're smart/good musicians? no. (exception of maybe dirnt) Do i think theyre a smart/good band? yes i do. they know that their stage presence will get them pretty dam far to make up for their otherwise crappy music.

MY 2 cents. pssh
socialtool
Bored with Sex
Join date: Dec 2002
171 IQ
#15
Quote by mangablade
i never thought id do this but...


what about greenday? ****ty band imo, but you have to admit, wether or not the music is good, at concerts they can get the crowd goin (i watched 10 mins of a live show) and they interact with the audience and everything. Do i think they're smart/good musicians? no. (exception of maybe dirnt) Do i think theyre a smart/good band? yes i do. they know that their stage presence will get them pretty dam far to make up for their otherwise crappy music.

MY 2 cents. pssh

I'm sorry but I have to say, yes they have awesome stage precence but also the sold out concerts are full of people who enjoy their music, myself included,. Would I call them great musicians, no. But I would call good musicians, they have the ability to right catchy fun music, that they enjoy and obviously lots of other people

A lot of people here confuse good music artfully, and good music for enertainment, most people don't wnat to listen to a 10 minute guitar solo regardless of how good you are,most people enjoy the parts of the music they can sing along with, they like music they can bob their head too.

I could care less about stage precence if I didn't like the bands music to be honest.
I listen to music and I don't need your opinions about what I listen to.
thecameronator
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2005
1,229 IQ
#16
the only bit of advice i could give is...wen ur making songs dont play what othere people want play what u want, what u think sounds good...otherwise u'll lose your intrest in music
SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
Join date: Aug 2004
627 IQ
#17
Quote by thecameronator
the only bit of advice i could give is...wen ur making songs dont play what othere people want play what u want, what u think sounds good...otherwise u'll lose your intrest in music


But on the other hand you'll lose the interest of the audience and possibly even get some complaints if you just play what you want to play, instead of what the audience want to hear.

For example, an emo band would not over well at a black-metal gig, a punk band at a prog. rock gig.

While it's good not to lose your sense of direction and musical interest, it's sometimes a good idea to play what other people want to hear as well, instead of just your own style. Hell, incorporate your style into other songs and genres. It's all good.
Zeus2716
UG's Washburn Player
Join date: May 2005
368 IQ
#18
Some of my own thoughts:

I hear people here talking all the time about drinking or smoking or doing other crazy **** before a show to get pumped. I disagree with that, im not sure anyone else does though. I find that when i get onstage, and i walk out of the wings into the spotlight with the crowd roaring, that gets me so pumped i dont need anything else. I think more people should try this, just going out and let the music guide them. its true, stage presence is important, but dont plan out your act. when you get up there and start grooving, everything will come to you, and it will be much more natural, and a better show. and always enjoy yourself.
just some thoughts...
pentagram_man63
Spammed
Join date: Dec 2004
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#19
Well, this is a good thread! Thanks to all who contributed, this is really useful.
TimiHendrix33
.
Join date: Sep 2005
629 IQ
#20
I personally thinhk you should do encores with up-beat songs,definelty not ballads.
When your body's tired, exercise your mind.
Gabuydachk
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2005
443 IQ
#21
learn famous songs in your genre and take requests
it's a good way to get the audience involved

'tis life
Yahz0r
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2004
77 IQ
#22
Whatever you do, shut up between the songs. and go ahead to the next one. We dont want breaks.
Yahyah
SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
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#23
Quote by Yahz0r
Whatever you do, shut up between the songs. and go ahead to the next one. We dont want breaks.


Although sometimes it's a good idea to introduce your band members, give the name of the band and the next song at various points in the show, either between songs or in a break-down. Both good.
darmaid_h
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2006
10 IQ
#24
i'm the leader of an irish band called entropy. we're starting work on origional stuff soon but for the last few months we've been doing covers. we're an ok band but we're getting great response where ever we go. there are two main reasons for this that i think would help other bands.

1: do all in your power to build a fan base. many of our friends follow us around to gigs,they help to set up sometimes and check the levels but the best thing they do is get people up. they start moshing and soon other people start too. by the time the night is over everyone has had a great time and goes away thinking ye're brilliant.

2: have a good time. i know that this has probably been posted amillion times but it works. don't worry if you hit a bum note or forget some words. the reason people go to see bands is to haer music and have a good time. if you have a good time then they will too.
D
Rodders
likes folk now
Join date: Mar 2004
477 IQ
#25
Quote by Yahz0r
Whatever you do, shut up between the songs. and go ahead to the next one. We dont want breaks.


But if you talk to the crowd, then it builds a bond between the band and the audience. It creates a connection between the two. There's nothing wrong with a bit of stage banter, introducing a song, or even telling a short story.....interaction is good. Bands that just shut up and play are generally boring.
acidity
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2006
245 IQ
#26
i would personally play your most well know, upbeat song at the end of the encore. all the bands ive seen have :S
SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
Join date: Aug 2004
627 IQ
#27
Quote by acidity
i would personally play your most well know, upbeat song at the end of the encore. all the bands ive seen have :S


Depends on whether or not you get an encore. From my view, the best thing is to start with your strongest song, which generally reels the audience in, and finish with your best song that the audience leave with a good impression fresh in their minds.
Then if you get an encore, it's up to you really, but something that's one of your reasonably stronger songs is good, but it's often good if that song is also a slow-ish one, so it calms people down before they leave.
It's all preference though; no set guidlines will work for every band in every situation. Unfortunately.
taxman27
UG's Quadrophenic
Join date: Dec 2005
144 IQ
#29
Quote by Rodders
But if you talk to the crowd, then it builds a bond between the band and the audience. It creates a connection between the two. There's nothing wrong with a bit of stage banter, introducing a song, or even telling a short story.....interaction is good. Bands that just shut up and play are generally boring.


Exactly, although there are times when you should talk and times you shut up. Like, for example, you shouldn't tell a big story about a song wrote if it's a 2 minute fast punk song. On the other hand though, stories can help, especially for slower songs, because with slower songs, you're trying to get an intimacy between you and the audience, and telling a story can really help that. Some other good tips, always introduce the band at the beginning, so your audience knows who you are before you start playing. Second, if you have a myspace or website, DO NOT forget to tell people about it. It helps make sure that the fans you get at the gig can keep track of your progress and attend future gigs and all that good stuff.
Why should I care
If I have to cut my hair
I have to move with the fashions
or be an outcast

The Who- "Cut My Hair" from the album Quadrophenia
Yahz0r
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2004
77 IQ
#30
Then if you get an encore, it's up to you really, but something that's one of your reasonably stronger songs is good, but it's often good if that song is also a slow-ish one, so it calms people down before they leave.

I really disagree. Well, what if there are other bands playing after you? I could think it would be great to play a fast and hard song as your last so that the next band looks boring and get them thinking that you were even better than you thought. Maybe :P
Yahyah
SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
Join date: Aug 2004
627 IQ
#31
Quote by Yahz0r
I really disagree. Well, what if there are other bands playing after you? I could think it would be great to play a fast and hard song as your last so that the next band looks boring and get them thinking that you were even better than you thought. Maybe :P


See this is the problem, in that there's no set formula for a gig, and what works best where varies. So there's no set in stone rules.

What you're saying does make a lot of sense, and it's not a half-bad idea to be honest. But if you're the last band on that night, or it's just your gig, then a slow-ish song that you can play really well is probably a good idea.
That said, something catchy may be an idea too, so people leave still singing your songs.
Yahz0r
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2004
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#32
Yeah, ofcourse it depends on the situation. How many bands playing etc. You're right.
Yahyah
rocker138
SexTypeThing~Lizard King
Join date: Apr 2006
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#33
wow this is a great thread!!!
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SomeEvilDude
Government Conspiracy
Join date: Aug 2004
627 IQ
#34
Quote by sheldonplank
ye're based in galway, right? never heard you play, but i want to. whens your next gig?


anyway, im just curious what ye all think of this. im in a band with probably a really class drummer, a good enough bassist, me (im an pretty good mostly rhythm guitarist) and one alrightish lead guitarist (buzz). we recently got a really great lead guitarist (mike) though, who really broadens the scope of music that we can play, and are thinking of kicking buzz out because, well, hes a twat.

anywho, originally the plan was to play easy covers at first, like for whom the bell tolls and raining blood, but now with mike, i think we could pull off the call of ktulu and angel of death (you might guess were a metal band), but im just wondering should we? like, as our first songs, i think were setting ourselves up for a huge fall. its not like the songs are impossible, though, because the mike can play the ktulu solo and i can play all the rhythm, and he can improv solo well enough to pass them off as slayer solos, and, well, angel of deaths rhythm guitar is easy.

im just wondering, do you think we should take the easy way out, or actually go for originality and quality in covers?


If this second guy is better and you get along fine, then play with him. And it's always better to go for originality and quality with your covers then just taking the easy way out.
Besides, when you write your own stuff, a more competent musician will ultimately make it better and help the song to flow more nicely.
ParadoxVocal
I read real music...
Join date: Jun 2006
10 IQ
#35
A few of the things I've found good in any style...

Start with a good moshing song... or a crowd interaction song... one that they can sing along to if your playing covers or are well known.... or just something they can mosh to.

You don't have to play and Encore I prefer not to play an Encore unless they're tearing up the stage in anger... i prefer to leave them wanting more. So they come back next time...

Leave them hanging Play shorter sets rather then longer... also between songs... Always have some sort of noise... or complete silence and no movement... so have the beginning of a song over and over again while you talk or just while the singer get's a drink.

Overdo every show - Make your audience feel like it's a professional Arena show as much as possible even if not.

Once again... these are all up to you
downcast_lg
walk with me in hell
Join date: Apr 2006
21 IQ
#36
A few tips in addition to the ones above (possibly repeating some, sorry i tried to read em all)

1. Opening with a cover works well, regardless of genre. Especially if your band is not that well known, playing 'Unholy Confessions' or a blink-182 song (If that's what your into ) gets the crowd's attention and makes them watch what you're playing.

2. Get some energy built up toward the middle of the set. As has been said before, it's like sex. Or if you don't understand that analogy it's like a story. There's the attention grabber, rising action, the climax, and the falloff. Get that climax to last for a bit . I'm in a heavy band so I'll use the example - start playing something catchy, and build into a wild pit for about 3-4 songs and then let it falloff and hopefully get an encore. Don't let them get tired of you, make 'em crazy and let them down.

3. Interact. Jump into the pit during the breakdown if you're the singer, that always get's them going. Stand on the edge of the stage and rock out. Make them part of the show. They want to rock out too, that's why they're there. If they won't get into it tell them to get the **** up!

4. Be relaxed, be natural. This means you have to be comfortable playing your songs and comfortable playing in front of people. You can't be tense and rock out and have people enjoy your show. Have a couple shots before the show to loosen you up if you need to, but don't play trashed. Be on top of your music and your show and people WILL notice.

Hope that helps someone, justsome tips from my limited experience.
_____________________________________________


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I am just a man with these two fists
ace man
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2006
377 IQ
#37
This is a really awesome, useful thread and a must read for anyone playing in a rock roll band. Personally, my band (the meteors, of which i play rhythm guitar or drums if the drummer doesn't turn up) kicks off with the stones 'rip this joint' and goes through a selection of stones, KISS, AC/DC, aerosmith and cold chisel songs, before wrapping up with 'let me go rock n' roll' (alive version). if we're asked for an encore we usualyl throw walk this way in or high voltage. We usually try to blitzkrieg the audience with sound - open with a lightning fast bombardment + airstrikes, then bring the heavy armour through and follow up with the infantry, and rolling on to victory in a halcion of rock n' roll
I gave rock n' roll to you

Anti-thayer
Last edited by ace man at Jul 16, 2006,
Y.D.P.B.C
Registered User
Join date: May 2006
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#39
Quote by Yahz0r
Whatever you do, shut up between the songs. and go ahead to the next one. We dont want breaks.


I don't think there is a particular formula with regards to this. Muse are one of the best live bands on the face of the earth, and Matt Bellamy never says more than a few words all night.

But sometimes, if the band are playing a long set, and break off with a wee chat in the middle, it can be brilliant. Dave Grohl did it when i saw the Foos at the SECC, and even with 9,999 other people in the room at the time, it really feels quite intimate and all the more special because of it.

If you've got buckets of charisma, it would be a waste not to blether between songs. But, if you're a bit awkward, then yeah, as the great Frank Zappa once said:

"Shut up, and play yer guitar"
Banter Assassin. Every thread I touch dies.

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Why Thank You.
TheUnholy
Unholier than thou...
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228 IQ
#40
Quote by sheldonplank
ye're based in galway, right? never heard you play, but i want to. whens your next gig?


anywho, originally the plan was to play easy covers at first, like for whom the bell tolls and raining blood, but now with mike, i think we could pull off the call of ktulu and angel of death



Being the musician's musician is always good, but you have to remember how many more people will want you to play FWTBT than Ktulu, unless you're playing to a crowd entirely composed of thrashers.
Quote by adamrandall
ahh yes SRV. i got the intro on texas flood (easy) and then he's like twangledoodleblopdebloo dun dun dun dun DA dun DA and im like *dead*.


The Unholy plays a Jackson Warrior X through a Metal Muff

Squigglymetal!